10 Reasons You Should Be Watching "Supernatural" Right Now

10 Reasons You Should Be Watching "Supernatural" Right Now

The show is a roller coaster ride that's well worth the wait.
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The world of "Supernatural" is a world filled with monsters and mayhem and crazy fans. If you are looking for a rollercoaster ride then you have found your destination because this show is so raw that it can make you laugh, but in the next moment make you cry. With goofball actors, Jensen Ackles and Jared Padalecki playing the leads it certainly takes you for a ride. This show never fails to keep you on the edge of your seat and always has some heart wrenching element just to make it hurt that much more. I love this show more than any others that I watch, and trust me that’s a long list, thank god for the DVR. So here are my top ten reasons to watch and fall in love with this show just as I have:

1. Good Looking Actors

We will start with the obvious. The lead actors are gorgeous. Jensen Ackles and Jared Padalecki are the epitome of tall and ruggedly handsome. Jensen Ackles is six foot one, toned, and has the most gorgeous green eyes you can imagine. Then you have Jared Padalecki who is six foot four, toned, as well, with beautiful hazel eyes. Oh but, we can’t forget the infamous Padalecki hair. Having these two to stare at certainly helps keep you interested in the show.

2. Great Acting

While, yes, these two are very nice to look at, they are also very talented actors. "Supernatural" is full of drama so it has scenes ranging anywhere from laughing on the ground funny to crying your eyes out on the bathroom floor. The individuals who play these roles do so with such passion they make it real for the viewer. When they can strike emotions in you, which this show does to me all the time, they are doing their job right. Despite knowing Dean didn’t really go to hell, the scene where he pours his heart out to Sam was one of the most heartbreaking scenes in the series and had me wanting to give Dean a hug and Jensen an Emmy.

3. The Life Lessons

The show, although complete fiction, teaches us as viewers a lot about life. One major theme in the show is family. The one big lesson they stress is “family don’t end in blood”, which I will come back to. They also teach you to enjoy the little things as they can help you through the day. Sam and Dean have been through their fair share of hard times, but things like pie, whiskey (ok, not the best example), the Impala, even something as simple as reading can helped them see the positive and just get through the day.

4. The Support Network

Since this show is very popular, it has a large following. I have found that I share a lot of commonalities with complete strangers that I met purely through the show. The fans of this show really care and show support for their fellow fans. The few people I have met through watching the show have helped me through some pretty difficult times and have been there for me since. It feels good to know that a complete stranger cares that you are still kicking.

5. The Supportive Actors

Not only are the fans supportive of the show and each other, but they actors of the show are also supportive of their fans. They give us gratitude for helping them become what they are and try to give back as much as they can. Jensen, Jared, and Misha all run charities that serve to help us in life with depression, shyness, or even to help you just get by. They created acts like Always Keep Fighting, You Are Never Alone, and Random Acts to help us deal with issues they themselves had troubles with.

6. The Actors Give Up A Lot

To make this show as wonderful as it is, it takes a lot of work, which sometimes costs the actors. For starters, the show films in Vancouver, Canada while both the main actors live in Austin, Texas. This means a lot of travel for them which I’m sure some of you know how exhausting that can be. Also, this means a lot of time away from their families. Both men have wives and three children that they don’t get see as much as they would like. You may think ‘Well they have hiatus to go home.’ While this is true, they both go to conventions all over the world. They do that for us, so we can meet them, talk to them, and get photos with them. They don’t have to do it, but they take time away from their family because they love their fans and want to do this for them.

7. Kick Butt Action

This show is heavy in the action, which makes sense since they have to fight monsters and such. However, the action is phenomenal and Jensen and Jared try to do as many of the stunts themselves as they can, which shows dedication. They practice these choreographed fights so much so that on screen they look great. Their punches look real, when they get thrown to the ground or into a tree it looks real, and it’s very well put together.

8. Family

Told you I’d come back to this. Family is basically the central theme of the show as it surrounds the relationship between Sam and Dean. This show shows you that you can create your own family and that they don’t need to be blood. This is shown with the boys with Bobby, Ellen, Joe, Jody, Claire, Alex, Charlie, and even everyone’s favorite angel, good old Castiel. They didn’t have relatives growing up so as they got older they surrounded themselves with people they cared about and who cared about them. The family scenes in this show are actually my favorite. Anytime there is a brotherly moment, or Jody being like a mom to the boys, or when Bobby was being a dad to them, those were the best in my opinion.

9. The Music

Ahhhh…. Good old classic rock. Who doesn’t like some rock-n-roll? That is the entire soundtrack to the series. It ranges from The Beatles to Led Zeppelin. They bring in some classics that everyone should know and then plays some that they make everyone know, like the song that has become their theme song, "Carry on My Wayward Son" by Kansas. Now, this music came out a little before my time, but since that’s the era my dad grew up in, that’s the kind of music I grew up with. So, before watching the show I knew most the music

10. The Villains You Hate to Love

Last, but certainly not least, the lovable villains. It’s safe to say true fans of "Supernatural" are Satan worshipers. I even find myself aligning with the devil from time to time. With Mark Pelligrino’s portrayal of Lucifer it made it hard not to sympathize with the poor misunderstood angel. Then you have guys like Crowley, who Mark Shepard did a terrific job at playing and will truly be missed, who you want to hate but you just can’t. As much as he plotted against the boys, he always had a soft spot for them and helped them just as much. His dying deed was helping them. I could go on and on but these are just a few examples. If a show can get you to fall in love with the villain than it must be pretty good, right?

Cover Image Credit: @cw_supernatural Instagram

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The Key To Ending Your First Draft Blues

Or at least getting through the next chapter with your hair intact
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Ah, the first draft. We’ve all been there as writers. The day we decide to turn a blank word document into a 70,000 word (or more) masterpiece. Or, at least, that’s always the aim. Often as first-time writers, we go into the experience blind, learning as we go, and never really knowing whether what we’re doing is right or wrong.

It can be frustrating at times, as most first drafts are a test of sanity. As somebody who had written ten first draft books (nearing eleven) in six years, I have had my fair share of ups and downs when it comes to first drafts.

My first book ever took me four years just to write it, I started at the age of sixteen and finished by the time I was twenty. A year later I had written another. I then wrote one in thirty days, and nowadays I write about three to four books a year.

My point is, there is no science to writing. It is all about learning how to do it, and finding the methods that suit you best. I just wish I could have had someone to tell me all of that when I started.

With that in mind, here are my five pieces of advice on how to write your first draft:

#5 Embrace the Terribleness

The first draft is always the worst version of any story. The sooner you accept it, the easier it is to move forward with your work. So you misspell a few words so bad that even Word can't help you. That shouldn't stop you from going with the flow. Your dialogue will feel hammier than a "Star Wars" film, but you'll clean it up the second time around. You're not expected to create a masterpiece on the first go, so just enjoy the ride.

#4 Suffer for your Art

Writing can be hard. I've said it enough times already, but it's true. You have to be prepared to suffer for it. The reason my first book took four years to write was because I didn't commit to it. The reason I wrote 80,000 words in thirty days was because I committed myself to write at least 1,000 words a day. Now I average 3,000 daily. Is it painful to force 3,000 words to the page every day? Yes, but that's what you have to do to get the draft finished.

#3 Take your Time

Now I know this goes against what I just said, but it's important that you go at the pace you want to. I was happier writing 1,000 words a day, but I was eighteen then. At twenty-three, I'll never get everything done going at 1,000 words a day. Commit yourself to writing every day, even if its only 200 words. Writing is a marathon, not a sprint. You'll get to the finishing line quicker if you jog a steady pace rather than adopting a sprint and rest mentality.

#2 Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff

Yes, it's important to remember what colour your character's hair is, which one is taller, and what weapon they are carrying. Although with that said, it is important to keep going forward. In my editing, I go over everything with a fine comb, often with a character profile at my side. Don't get bogged down giving every little detail the first time around, you'll have time for that later. The hardest thing is getting it down the first time.

#1 Keep the Story Going at All Costs

This kind of goes without saying, but it is by far the most important step for me. You have to keep moving forward. It doesn't matter if you have to use the biggest Deus ex machina to get your plot going again, you can always edit it away in the re-draft. I use a technique called automatic writing, which means that I don't plan every detail of a chapter. I simply write it as I go. This allows me to give my characters natural reactions as events often come as a surprise to me too.

Obviously it is good to have a rough idea of what is meant to happen, but as long as you can get your characters from A to B, then you are half way there. The other half will be polishing it to the point you can see your reflection.

Good luck, and happy writing.

Cover Image Credit: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Writer%27s_Block_I.jpg

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4 Steps To Writing a Haiku

It's Fun I Promise
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You've probably had to write a haiku for English sometime in your school career. You most likely found it boring, or difficult, or just plain stupid. I am going to try and show you a more fun way to write a haiku.

1. The Basics: What You Should Know

In case you don't know, a haiku is a Japanese poem that is only three lines long. It is usually taught that the syllables in each line should go 5-7-5. But really, as long as there are 17 syllables or less in the three lines, it's a haiku.

2. Write to Get a Reaction

When you write a haiku, you are aiming to get one of three reactions: Aaaahhh, aha!, or ha ha! For example...

Aaahhh: Laying in bed/dog next to me under blanket/my furry heater

Aha!: Life is too short to love people/who do not deserve/your whole heart

Ha ha!: I'm on the toilet/and my stomach drops/the roll is empty

3. Create an Image

In your writing, you want to create a new image in your readers mind with each line. Take my first haiku for example. I first talk about laying in bed. Then, I say there is a dog next to me under the blanket, so you picture a lump under the covers. In my last line, I call him a furry heater so you imagine a heater covered in fur. The image you create is more important than the syllables.

4. Performing

Lastly, you need to think about performing your haiku. As always, when you're speaking in front of a room of people, you need to project so the whole room can hear you and you need to make eye contact. Another thing to remember is the tone of your voice while you are saying your poem. Dramatic pauses can keep people on the edge of their seat, waiting for what you're going to say next. You also have to remember to be confident! And if you're not confident, fake it till you make it!

Cover Image Credit: Imgur

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