In case you weren't aware, one of Nickelodeon's most beloved series, Hey Arnold!, finally received its well-deserved conclusion.

Personally, I loved the movie and think it serves as a satisfying ending while teasing the possibility of a series revival (creator Craig Barlett is down with the idea). But, between recovering from turkey hangovers and engaging in the post-Thanksgiving hunt for shopping deals, it's possible that you forgot this show even existed - let alone was due for a movie. If you do get the chance to watch the film, be prepared as a wave of nostalgic euphoria will surely wash over you.

WARNING: This article contains spoilers!

I guess you could call this a review. I don't expect to sway anyone's opinion of the movie or series by expressing my ideas. Anyway, the film picks up a year after the series' conclusion and follows Arnold & co. as they advance from the 5th to the 6th grade. Before they leave for the summer, however, an opportunity to travel to San Lorenzo (if you recall, Arnold's parents went missing there) is presented to them. Naturally, Arnold's gaga over the idea even after his grandparents heavily discourage him from looking for his parents. Of course, he gets the opportunity to travel there after he wins a video contest courtesy of Helpers for Humanity.

From there is where the plot begins to take flight and propels into the narrative that Millennials have been waiting for nearly two decades. Are Arnold's parents alive? Will he finally reciprocate Helga's feelings for him? Both of these questions are answered in the span of 80 minutes with little to be desired. As a conclusion to the series, it satiates a fan's appetite for answers. I think what will be most memorable for me, however, is the overall feel and atmosphere of the film. It might be an action-packed movie set in the middle of the jungle, but somehow, it remains true to the placid, slice of life vibe that the original series gave off.

The events of the film aren't horribly bizarre (but you probably need tons of bad luck to end up in the situation are protagonists get into) for the reality in which the series is set. If anything, I'd compare it to maybe the Rugrats movies sans all the cringe-worthy toilet humor. It's simply a story about kids getting into the crazy-ass shenanigans that kids do and the adults have to try to save them (We're going to use that term loosely here).

I know some people who were expecting the film to have more of an emotional impact - since the film was intended to serve as the finale for the series - but truthfully, I love the ending the way it was. It was simple, melancholic, and left the series at the equilibrium it was at before. After all, the desire for normalcy was all that Arnold wanted.