The Best Parts Of A Wedding

The Best Parts Of A Wedding

Weddings are always fun, but there are a few moments that stand out every time.
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I went to a wedding this past weekend and it was flawless. Personally, I love going to weddings because they are occasions that bring out the best in people. Everyone is laughing, smiling, dancing, crying, and in general just so friendly and upbeat. I suppose it’s because people love to rally around love. And by that I mean weddings are a validation that love really does work out for some people, which brings everyone else a little hope.

There are usually three main parts to a wedding: the rehearsal dinner, the wedding ceremony, and the reception. Now these are all fun in their own regard, but there are specific parts of each that should be looked forward to.



The Rehearsal Dinner: This is the first event where you actually see the number of people that have gathered to celebrate the couple. This is also the night where many roasts (disguised as toasts) take place, sparking lots of laughter and usually mild embarrassment on the groom or bride’s side.



The food at this event, as well as the wedding is always on point. Also, when you’re one of the youngest people there, the "kid’s table" is where you will find yourself, (well, a kid’s table with all 20+ year-olds). I will never be too old for the kid’s table; that’s where all the entertainment is anyway.



The Wedding Ceremony: This is definitely the sweetest part of all. Everyone sits quietly waiting for the bridal party to enter the venue. Finally, the groomsmen and bridesmaids start walking down the main aisle, and then you hear the wedding march and everyone looks back to see the bride. It might be because of the movie, "27 Dresses," but I have started looking back at the groom at this part because it’s the first time he’s seeing his future wife, and he always looks incredibly happy and awestruck, which is beautiful to witness. Obviously it’s great watching the bride coming down the aisle, too, because she always looks gorgeous, and the dresses are always something out of a fairytale.



The vows and rings are exchanged, and if you look around, the married couples are all holding hands. It’s just really special.

But enough sappy stuff…



The Reception: This is the party everyone looks forward to all weekend. The bride and groom are relieved because they are finally married, and now they can just relax and party with their family and friends. Whether there is a band or a DJ, the music is always a mix of classic throwbacks and some modern hits that get everyone to the dancefloor. Usually the result of an open bar, people have no qualms about showing off their moves. There is always one guy that has had just a little too much, entertaining everyone with his spastic dancing.



Finally there are the people at weddings. I love meeting new people, and as I mentioned (probably due to intoxication) everyone is super friendly, and sometimes, hilarious conversations come out of these encounters.



Basically, weddings are awesome. The people, the music, the food, the dancing; it’s all pretty great. People should get married more often, for the sake of everyone else.

Cover Image Credit: tuscanyballroom.org

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11 Things 20-Year-Olds Who Look 12 Are Tired Of Hearing

No, I don't need a kids' menu, thank you very much.
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I used to just laugh it off when someone thought I was 12 years old back when I was in high school, but now that I am three years deep into college getting ready to graduate, I don’t laugh anymore. If you are in the same situation as me looking like a child trying to get into a bar/club and the bouncer is questioning if your ID is fake, please read on — you may relate very much. Here are 11 things 20+ year-olds who look 12 are tired of hearing:


1. I didn’t know they let 12-year-olds work here.

Nope. They don’t.

2. What school do you go to?

Me: Florida State.

Person: University?!

3. *Tries to get a sample at Target* Is your parent nearby?

Let me FaceTime my mom really quick and ask her permission for this protein bar sample.

SEE ALSO: 11 Things 20-Year-Olds Who Look 12 Are Tired Of Saying

4. *Server at a restaurant* Here you go, sweetie. What can I get you, darling? Hi, honey, how are you?

You are no more than three years older than me, there is no need for "sweetie."

5. It’s your birthday? Happy Birthday! How old now, fourteen/fifteen?

6. You look so much older when you wear makeup.

Is that supposed to be a compliment?

7. Wow, you're how old? You look like you are twelve.

Have you seen a twelve-year-old lately?

8. You probably just look young because you're short.


9. *Tries to flirt with a guy* You're a little too young for me I think.

I'm your age. Maybe even older.


10. Are you old enough to see this movie? Can I see your ID please?

11. You're going to be so thankful when you are in your 50's.

So I've been told. Hopefully, it's worth it.

Cover Image Credit: YouTube

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It Took Me 4 Years And $100K To Realize Why Poor Kids Like Me Don’t Go To College

But now that I know, I can't get it out of my mind.

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I grew up poor.

There, I said it. It's out in the open now—I don't come from a family that has a bunch of money. In fact, my family doesn't have much money at all. My single mother works in fast food and does a DAMN good job trying to support herself and the rest of us. A lot of the food my family gets comes from food pantries. We have received government assistance before. I grew up poor, but I haven't let that define me.

Especially when it came to going to college.

I didn't want to let my economic background hold me back from my potential. I wanted to be the first person on both sides of my family to receive my college degree. I wanted to get a better paying job and moving up in socioeconomic status so I don't have to be the "poor" girl with the "poor" family all my life. I'm not really ashamed of coming from a poor family, but I also don't want to be poor my entire life.

For a majority of my college career, I wondered why there weren't many poor students around me at college. I go to a public university, and it's just the same price as any other state school really. Coming from a lower income home, I did receive a lot of assistance, and without it, there's no way in hell I could be here. I know that many other lower-income students can get this same assistance, which really made me wonder why there was such a lack of other poor kids around me.

I mean, everyone posts videos from their nice, upper-middle-class homes on Snapchat over holiday breaks while I go back home to the trailer park.

Everyone can call mom or dad and ask for money when things get rough while I pay for 100% of the things I own because my mother simply cannot afford it.

Everyone walks around in their name-brand clothes while I'm rocking Walmart knockoffs. It's not something I thought about for a couple years in college, but once I noticed it, I couldn't think of anything else.

It took me nearly all four years of college to realize why there's such a lack of poor students at my average, public university. Poor students are set up for failure in college. It's almost designed to be a survival of the fittest when it comes to us lower-income students, and those of us who are deemed the fittest and do make it to graduation day are typically stuck with a lot of debt that we don't have the financial intelligence or support to even think about paying off.

Poor students are in the minority in college, and when you're in a minority anywhere, surviving can be difficult. When it costs $100 just for a 5-digit code to do your homework, it can be hard to stay in school. When the cost of living on campus is $10,000 or rent for an apartment is nearly $500 a month, it can be hard to stay in school. When you don't have a car because you can't save up the money for one and your parents can't help you, it can be hard to stay in school. When you're forced to get a minimum wage, on-campus job that limits your to twenty hours a week, it can be hard to stay in school. When all of your friends don't understand why you can't go out to eat or to the bar every weekend, it can be hard to stay in school. All of these reasons add up to the main reason why poor kids don't go to college—the odds are stacked against us.

I never had shame in my socioeconomic status until I went to college. In my hometown, I wasn't much less than the norm. Now, my home life is drastically different than that of all of my friends. I know that this is something that is never going to change because when I enter the workforce in less than a year, I'll be going in as the first member of my family with a college degree. People will treat me differently when I tell them this, even if I don't want them to. People will treat me differently when they ask where my parents work and I tell them McDonald's. It's an unfortunate reality that I cannot control.

It took me nearly all four years to realize why poor kids don't go to college, but now that I know, I can't get it off my mind.

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