Thank You To My Tumblr Community

Thank You To My Tumblr Community

You know all my secrets.
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Tumblr is a social media site like no other. For those of you who don't know, tumblr is a site where anyone can make a blog and once you have one you can post anything and follow other blogs that interest you. It's kind of like Facebook, but there's an anonimousity to it because more than likely you don't know any of your followers in real life. Unlike Facebook, on tumblr people follow your blog because they like your content and want to see more of it. So all of the followers you have are based on how well you run your blog and how it appeals to others.

I've been active on the site for about five years now and over the years I've posted a lot about my personal life. My main blog is a mental illness recovery blog where I've written about my struggles over the years. It's pretty much my personal diary open for strangers to read. At first it was just a place where I could let out my inner thoughts and feelings, but after finding similar blogs and people going through the same things as me it became a support system. I met people I could talk to about my struggles and they understood exactly where I was coming from. That sense of community was so helpful when I felt like I was alone in the real world.

It probably sounds weird to non tumblr users that we share very detailed experiences in our lives with complete strangers, but the truth is it's not weird at all. I have friends I've met on tumblr that know more intimate details of my life than my best friends and family in the real world know. It's kind of weird to call these people my friends because we've never met in person and we only talk over text occasionally, but these are the people that know what's really going on with me on the inside. When someone reads your internal thoughts and feelings on the daily they really get to know you. So no, I'll probably never get to meet these people, but having them be there for me in tough times has made all the difference.

Don't be offended if I never show you my tumblr because for me that'd be like showing you my diary. There are things on there I'd never want my loved ones to read, but typing it out and posting it for other bloggers to read makes me feel validated. I know most other bloggers in the recovery community feel the same way as I do about keeping their blog away from people in their real life. I've seen people delete their blogs because someone from their lives found them. Luckily I've never had to do that, but I can see how stressful it'd be for someone to go through.

Just know that tumblr can be a safe haven for many millennials and even younger teens and we should keep it that way. It's incredibly therapeutic to have a place where you can let out all of your feelings without worrying about judgement. So thank you, to my tumblr community for always listening to my complainy posts and for giving me words of encouragement when I need it most!

Cover Image Credit: Mashable

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8 Struggles Of Being 21 And Looking 12

The struggle is real, my friends.
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“You'll appreciate it when you're older." Do you know how many times my mom has told me this? Too many to count. Every time I complain about looking young that is the response I get. I know she's right, I will love looking young when I'm in my 40s. However, looking young is a real struggle in your 20s. Here's what we have to deal with:

1. Everyone thinks your younger sister or brother is the older one.

True story: someone actually thought my younger sister was my mom once. I've really gotten used to this but it still sucks.

2. You ALWAYS get carded.

Every. Single. Time. Since I know I look young, I never even bothered with a fake ID my first couple of years of college because I knew it would never work. If I'm being completely honest, I was nervous when I turned 21 that the bartender would think my real driver's license was a fake.

3. People look at your driver's license for an awkward amount of time.

So no one has actually thought my real driver's license is fake but that doesn't stop them from doing a double take and giving me *that look.* The look that says, “Wow, you don't look that old." And sometimes people will just flat out say that. The best part is this doesn't just happen when you're purchasing alcohol. This has happened to me at the movie theater.

SEE ALSO: 10 Things People Who Look 12 Hate Hearing

4. People will give you *that look* when they see you drinking alcohol.

You just want to turn around and scream “I'M 21, IT'S LEGAL. STOP JUDGING ME."

5. People are shocked to find out you're in college.

If I had a dollar for every time someone had a shocked expression on their face after I told them I'm a junior in college I could pay off all of my student loan debt. It's funny because when random people ask me how school is going, I pretty much assume they think I'm in high school and the shocked look on their face when I start to talk about my college classes confirms I'm right.

6. For some reason wearing your hair in a ponytail makes you look younger.

I don't understand this one but it's true. Especially if I don't have any makeup on I could honestly pass for a child.

7. Meeting an actual 12-year-old who looks older than you.

We all know one. That random 12-year-old who looks extremely mature for her age and you get angry because life isn't fair.

8. Being handed a kids' menu.

This is my personal favorite. It happens more often than it should. The best part of this is it's your turn to give someone a look. The look that says, "You've got to be kidding me".

Looking young is a real struggle and I don't think everyone realizes it. However, with all the struggles that come with looking young, we still take advantage of it. Have you ever gone to a museum or event where if you're under a certain age you get in for a discounted price? Yeah? Well, that's when I bet you wish you were us. And kids' meals are way cheaper than regular meals so there have definitely been a couple times when I've kept that kids' menu.

So, all in all, it's not the worst thing in the world but it's definitely a struggle.

Cover Image Credit: Jenna Collins

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Social Media Is A Trivial Part Of Our Lives Because It Makes Us Addicted To Unimportant Matters

As someone who was told to this under an incentive, this experience gave me an understanding about an addiction that I had.

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Recently I took it upon myself to go on a social media cleanse, and from this I learned more about self control and who I am when I left social media. During this time period I began to see how my life would have been if I lived in an earlier time period or if I didn't have my phone. I took it upon myself to leave social media for a period of five days. I knew these five days would be hard as I would be more and more tempted, but I went cold turkey and only kept iMessage as my connection to others. I knew that if I kept anything else, I would continue to be tempted to go ahead and click the re-download button.

My family and I were able to communicate better as I had convinced them to do the challenge with me. The first two days were hard as we all continued to click on the empty location where Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter or whatever used to be. However, toward the end of the week, we all began to be happier without these social media in our phones. My family and I were able to talk about issues and current events that were happening in the world without having biased opinions that social media might bring.

This entire experience helped me realize that my opinions can be shaped without those on social media. I read more news about events happening around us. I was especially intrigued about the Superbowl that was coming up and what were the rumors and opinions surrounding the game. This helped me look at news in a new perspective and helped me realize there is more than just the glance at my phone.

In relation to my friends, for the first couple days, I felt extremely out of touch with them. I felt like I was missing out on important information or "tea" as my friend would refer to it as. I was especially worried about my Snapchat streaks and what would happen to them in my absence. However, by the end of the week, my entire mentality had changed for the better. I began to understand how trivial such stuff like Snapchat streaks were. My friendships were not defined by factors such as how long our streak was' it was more about how we felt about each other and how close we were.

Events that were covered on social media also began to have a negative effect for me as I would begin to see the dogmatic view that came with such a personal thing like media. I began to see that I was only seeing what I wanted to see and had to explore my boundaries to learn more about the world around us. As the week ended, I noticed that my screen time on my phone had gone down by 75 percent and that I was sleeping close to an hour earlier than usual.

These statistics shocked me as I realized how bad my addiction had gotten. While I did re-downloaded the apps, I noticed that I am not dependent on them as I was eight days ago.

At the end of this whole experience, I can say that I felt like a person coming out of rehab. I felt a lot better as a I realized that I wasn't constantly checking my phone every five seconds to check for that latest Snapchat or twitter update. This experience helped change me into the better person I am, even though this challenge only lasted for a short period of time.

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