The Age-Old Game Of Telephone Has Wiggled Its Way Into Our Adult Lives

The Age-Old Game Of Telephone Has Wiggled Its Way Into Our Adult Lives

He said, she said, they said, but none of that is what was actually said.

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Did you ever play telephone as a kid?

One person would say something like, "I want pizza." By the time it got back to the person who initially said something, the sentence would be, "I have blue monkeys." As it moved from mouth to mouth, the story changed not ever asking the source what happened. They never heard anything or saw anything for themselves. They believed what was passed along. As we grow up, telephone becomes gossip, leading to assumptions and accusations.

I think everyone can raise their hand to "who has ever said or done something they didn't really mean but were upset, tired, confused, etc. at the time the event happened"?

"We all make mistakes, have struggles, and even regret things in our past. But you are not your mistakes, you are not your struggles, and you are here NOW with the power to shape your day and your future." — Steve Maraboli, "Unapologetically You: Reflections on Life and the Human Experience"

Sometimes our feelings and emotions get the best of us, especially if you've been holding them in for so long. We often seek comfort in those around us, the ones who say we can trust them and want to help give us advice and understand. What I don't understand is why people feel the need to share those emotions and feelings you confided in them about, but it happens, even if they were eager to help, relate, and give advice on.

"If people refuse to look at you in a new light and they can only see you for what you were, only see you for the mistakes you've made, if they don't realize that you are not your mistakes, then they have to go." - Steve Maraboli, Life, the Truth, and Being Free

"If someone isn't what others want them to be, the others become angry. Everyone seems to have a clear idea of how other people should lead their lives, but none about his or her own." ― Paulo Coelho, "The Alchemist"

We all make mistakes, and that doesn't give people the right to attack and/or bully you over them especially when they didn't hear it or see it themselves. I have never understood the thrill some people seek or continuously hurting others or making them feel terrible about themselves. There is no gain from being mean to others for no reason other than gossip they are holding to be the truth.

The stress and anxiety of bullying and attacking someone can be very severe. You have to remember the bullies and attackers are not in charge of you and can not tell you what to do or control you. Everyone is allowed to think, understand, and feel in their own way. It is okay to be your own person and express your feelings.

"People can tell you to keep your mouth shut, but that doesn't stop you from having your own opinion." — Anne Frank, "The Diary of a Young Girl"

"It's okay to disagree with the thoughts or opinions expressed by other people. That doesn't give you the right to deny any sense they might make. Nor does it give you a right to accuse someone of poorly expressing their beliefs just because you don't like what they are saying. — Ashley Lorenzana

You have to be able to forgive yourself for past mistakes and forgive others as well. Don't continue to beat yourself up or let others do the same. Let yourself be free and at peace. Rid yourself of negativity and the people that contribute to it in your life. Allow yourself to be happy and surround yourself with positive and uplifting people.

So, I leave you with this:

"How would your life be different if…You stopped allowing other people to dilute or poison your day with their words or opinions? Let today be the day…You stand strong in the truth of your beauty and journey through your day without attachment to the validation of others" ― Steve Maraboli, "Life, the Truth, and Being Free"

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10 Things Someone Who Grew Up In A Private School Knows

The 10 things that every private school-goer knows all too well.

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1. Uniforms

Plaid. The one thing that every private school-goer knows all too well. It was made into jumpers, skirts, shorts, scouts, hair ties, basically anything you could imagine, the school plaid was made into. You had many different options on what to wear on a normal day, but you always dreaded dress uniform day because of skirts and ballet flats. But it made waking up late for school a whole lot easier.

2. New people were a big deal

New people weren't a big thing. Maybe one or two a year to a grade, but after freshman year no one new really showed up, making the new kid a big deal.

3. You've been to school with most of your class since Kindergarten


Most of your graduating class has been together since Kindergarten, maybe even preschool, if your school has it. They've become part of your family, and you can honestly say you've grown up with your best friends.

4. You've had the same teachers over and over

Having the same teacher two or three years in a row isn't a real surprise. They know what you are capable of and push you to do your best.

5. Everyone knows everybody. Especially everyone's business.

Your graduating class doesn't exceed 150. You know everyone in your grade and most likely everyone in the high school. Because of this, gossip spreads like wildfire. So everyone knows what's going on 10 minutes after it happens.

6. Your hair color was a big deal

If it's not a natural hair color, then forget about it. No dyeing your hair hot pink or blue or you could expect a phone call to your parents saying you have to get rid of it ASAP.

7. Your school isn't like "Gossip Girl"

There is no eating off campus for lunch or casually using your cell phone in class. Teachers are more strict and you can't skip class or just walk right off of campus.

8. Sports are a big deal

Your school is the best of the best at most sports. The teams normally go to the state championships. The rest of the school that doesn't play sports attends the games to cheer on the teams.

9. Boys had to be clean-shaven, and hair had to be cut

If you came to school and your hair was not cut or your beard was not shaved, you were written up and made to go in the bathroom and shave or have the head of discipline cut your hair. Basically, if you know you're getting written up for hair, it's best just to check out and go get a hair cut.

10. Free dress days were like a fashion show

Wearing a school uniform every day can really drive you mad. That free dress day once a month is what you lived for. It was basically a fashion show for everyone, except for those upperclassmen who were over everything and just wore sweat pants.

Cover Image Credit: Authors Photos

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Being Self-Conscious Is More Toxic Than You May Believe

Everyone feels this way at some point or another, but it doesn't make it any less unhealthy.

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I get in my own way more often than anyone else ever will. I can never explain exactly why, but all of my hesitating, doubting, and revoking participation can be boiled down to having made completely unsupported misinterpretations about social situations.

I always tend to paint myself in a negative light right off the bat: the things I do and don't say are always taken the wrong way. The way I answer questions in class. I mean, even the things I tweet aren't immune to my own overanalysis. Dumb, right?

But the complete truth of the matter is that those who aren't already going through this straining process in their own brains would certainly never spend the time doing it to you. In the best way possible, they don't care… about the silly things, of course.

Though this certainly and unfortunately doesn't hold true for every single person you'll engage, the majority of people aren't actively looking for what you (and only you) perceive as "bad." Maybe I'm just an optimist in saying that I believe people are good at heart and naturally want to see that in others before anything else. To be perfectly candid—and frank—it's just exhausting trying to do anything else.

And you know, maybe I really am the only one who is this inhibited. My intuition tells me that there's absolutely no way this can be true, but isn't that the exact thing I choose to ignore every time I question myself? This self-isolating feeling only becomes stronger when we fail to see the humanness of other people who we hold highly in our lives.

It's hard to imagine that they could also ever feel insecure about anything so seemingly trivial, but it's likely they're thinking the same thing about you. I can't say that this more astute social awareness is going to sweep unjustified self-consciousness and insecurity from the individual's mind so effortlessly, but it makes for a more understanding, empathetic, collective consciousness that tends to be more forgiving to oneself.

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