The World Needs To Take Drug Use Seriously In 2018

The World Needs To Take Drug Use Seriously In 2018

Now is not the time to be naive

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We all were taught since middle school that drugs were bad, thanks to the D.A.R.E program. Now let's be honest here, how many of us actually paid attention? We were all focused on the mustache we sketched on the lion from the booklet that was passed out to us. Or maybe we were laughing at the scenarios stated in the pamphlet, assuming those were just made up and that it never actually happened in the real world. Oh, how naive we were. In 2014, 1.3 million teens were diagnosed with a substance abuse disorder.

All over the media, rather it is the news on your television or the twitter notification on your phone, you always see a headline regarding drug use in the celebrity world. Most recently, the world saw Demi Lovato fall into an overdose of heroin. As shocking as this was, Demi has made sure that her following and her team were aware of her previous struggles from early on. She even made a YouTube documentary, Simply Complicated, explaining her substance abuse, alcoholism, and depression.

This incident took social media by storm. I caught myself constantly thinking about someone I lost to heroin, then my mind trickled into an abyss of how many people actually pass away solely due to heroin. My friend who passed away was under the age of 20 and was strung out from heroin every day, according to a journal he kept in his bedside. 21.5 million Americans aged 12 and older struggled with a substance use disorder involving heroin in 2015. This number has only increased over the years, and honestly, it is scaring me.

Now, who do we blame for this in particular? Definitely not the police officers who were forced into a classroom full of kids that weren't paying attention. What about the media? Think about it, all of the songs being played that could influence the children, the tabloids spreading pictures of celebrities. No, that also doesn't sound logical. Surely, I can vouch that it is not the person who experimented with drugs.

Addiction is not a choice, and nobody is actively searching for a psychological addiction.

People are dying no matter what. The moment you are born, you are perceived to be dying. Rather, smoking cigarettes, for example, are known to "speed up the process." Drugs are most commonly used to numb the pain the taker is experiencing, and to distract the mind from something that is not the pain their feeling. Globally stopping the use of drugs is inevitable, but there are some solutions to decrease the statistics of drug use, such as painting, singing, and dancing around your room naked. Seriously.

The world is in drastic need to understand that drugs are impacting how we live on this earth. People are passing away before they should, they are becoming dependent on the feeling of being intoxicated, and their support system isn't as strong as it should be. We as a society need to promote healthier coping mechanisms to decrease the number of deaths and usage of drugs, although as stated before, it can never be laid to rest.

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It's Time To Get Real About Drug Education Before We Lose Another 26-Year-Old To An 'Accident'

With the right education, individuals can look at a cocktail of fentanyl, cocaine, and alcohol and know exactly what the results will be.

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Just two months after Mac Miller's fatal overdose, the LA County Coroner confirmed that his death was a result of mixed drug toxicity (fentanyl, cocaine, and alcohol), calling the overdose an "accident."

While it's still fair to call this loss a tragic (and far too common) result of an ongoing battle with addiction, the headline sheds light on another truth: we desperately need better drug education in this country.

Most schools in the United States offer some kind of curriculum on drug education, typically limited to a very brief unit in health class and almost exclusively based on abstinence-only logic.

One of the most widely recognized abstinence-based programs that nearly all young adults can recall an experience with is the D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program. We've all seen the shirts, often worn ironically more than anything else nowadays. This irony is well-deserved: upon review, the program has been deemed ineffective at decreasing drug abuse.

Through a large-scale study done in 2009, data revealed that teens enrolled in the program were just as likely to use drugs as were those who received no intervention. Regardless, the D.A.R.E. program has been put in place in 75% of U.S. school districts and 43 countries.

This bare minimum initiative is right about where drug education stops for most young adults.

What we see time and time again is the fatality of this misinformation. And it makes sense — if children aren't learning something in school, and it's a topic that's still too taboo for most parents to want to cover in their homes, how are they supposed to navigate the very real dangers of life beyond classroom walls? How are we preparing these children once they realize that "just say no" simply isn't realistic?

Unlike calculus or Shakespeare, drug education is one area that will continue to follow children once they graduate and beyond. It's an area that impacts every single young person, despite their background, their past, or their future. But it's also the area we ignore the most and pretend doesn't need to be discussed.

With the right education, individuals can look at a cocktail of fentanyl, cocaine, and alcohol and know exactly what the results will be without the term "accident" attached to it. With the right education, a friend can have Narcan on hand and know when and how to use it in the case of an overdose. With the right education, we can stop losing 26-year-olds and we can stop labeling them "accidents."

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Thinking Of Tripping On LSD? Here Are 10 Things You Need To Know

This is a harm-reduction guide for LSD strictly for educational purposes and I do not promote the sale or usage of any illegal substances, so trip at your own risk!

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LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), or acid, is a hallucinogenic drug created by scientist Albert Hofmann in the 1940s. LSD, along with other psychedelic drugs (shrooms, DMT, ayahuasca, peyote, salvia, MDMA, etc.) produces hallucinations and alters one's perceptions of the world.

Today, much of society sees psychedelics as these dangerous, lethal substances that are as dangerous as methamphetamine or cocaine. But the truth is, LSD and other psychedelics have potential medicinal benefits for those suffering from PTSD, anxiety, and depression and often can induce spiritual, introspective and life-changing experiences.

If you are thinking of tripping on acid, it's important you do some research and know exactly what you'll be experiencing. LSD is not for the faint-hearted, nor should it be taken irresponsibly. Ultimately, only you can decide whether this is something you wish to do. Here are some things to consider.

1. Dosage

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A normal, standard tab of acid will usually have 100-200 micrograms (ug) of LSD. LSD is measured in micrograms, and 100-150ug is the usual starting dosage for beginners. DO NOT TAKE MORE THAN THAT FOR YOUR FIRST TRIP.

2. Set and setting

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Set and setting are the most important parts for a positive LSD trip. Set refers to one's state of mind before they trip, and setting refers to one's environment in which they trip. It's important to be in a good emotional state, and to be in a safe place when you're tripping.

3. Do it with friends, and have a trip-sitter

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It's definitely more fun and meaningful when you trip with a close, trusted friend or group of friends. A trip-sitter, is also recommended for first-timers – someone SOBER who can watch over you and keep you safe and comfort you if you get anxious.

4. Be smart and safe

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LSD trips usually last around 12 hours, so I would recommend tripping on a day where you absolutely have nothing to do and no responsibilities and you won't need to drive or operate any motor vehicles. You will not be able to sleep. As with alcohol and other drugs, do not drive.

5. What will I experience?

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Everyone experiences trips differently. Some people will have more intense hallucinations than others, and some people will not have any at all. Some common things you may experience are visual hallucinations (seeing patterns and shapes), and auditory hallucinations (sounds and music sounding clearer or differently). Reality will be altered, including your senses and perceptions of your environment.

6. What should I do while tripping?

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Listen/play music. Watch a movie, or a TV show. If possible, go out for a walk in nature. Have deep conversations with your friends. Paint, draw, and create art. It's all up to what you're comfortable with.

7. Is it safe to do alone?

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Yes. But it is not recommended for first-timers, tripping alone should be for more experienced users. That's why a trip-sitter or a group of friends to do it with is recommended.

8. What if I get anxious and paranoid?

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Relax and breathe. LSD brings out a lot of thoughts and emotions that you may have and amplify them greatly. When it comes to tripping, please be mindful of your mental health. Avoid triggers, and avoid visiting bad or sad memories. Remove yourself from the environment if possible, and go lie down and try and calm yourself or talk to your trip-sitter.

9. I want to know more about the science behind LSD…

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There's several studies and info guides online, as well as YouTube videos.

AsapSCIENCE: Your Brain on LSD and Acid

PsychedSubstance: LSD in 3 Minutes

10. I’m having second thoughts about doing this…

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You don't have to do it. You should never feel pressured by anyone to do something you don't feel comfortable with. Ultimately, choosing to trip on acid is your own choice, and it's important to know what you will be getting into beforehand.

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