8 Tips For Surviving Your University Call Center Job

8 Tips To Survive Your University Call Center Job Without Phoning It In

Even if you don't love your job, you don't have to hate it.

92
views

If you're thinking about how to make a dent in some of your bills, working at your university's call center could be the way to do it. Most campuses have them and the people hiring for open positions frequently hire current students or alumni because they know those people can represent the establishment well.

Working in a call center generates income but it's not always easy. Here are some tips for thriving as you master the phone lines.

1. Don't take rejection personally

Many outgoing people love working in a university call center because the job allows them to talk to such a wide variety of individuals. However, some won't be thrilled about picking up the phone and hearing your voice. Maybe they just sat down to dinner or are dealing with the stresses of a fussy toddler.

If the person you're calling gets upset, take a deep breath, apologize for disturbing them and clarify that you'll get back in touch at a more convenient time. Never assume the rejection is a reflection of your skills or who you are.

2. Use calming essential oils

Even the most level-headed people occasionally feel swamped by the kind of work a call center demands. If you often get anxious, consider using a temple balm with a soothing scent such as lavender. Temple balms are lightweight substances you can apply to the insides of your wrists or even spread a tiny bit inside your nostrils.

Otherwise, look for essential oils sold in roll-on applicators. They're typically about the size of a tube of lip balm, making them easy to carry in your pocket and retrieve when you feel under pressure at work.

3. Confide in your colleagues when appropriate

Everyone has bad days, in call centers and elsewhere. One beneficial element of working in a call center is that all the other people gazing at computer interfaces and using phones around you have almost certainly gone through experiences similar to the ones that threaten to make you lose your cool.

Don't be afraid to confide in them about things other call center employees understand. But, only do that when the time is right. Don't start griping about an upsetting customer when the person sitting next to you is conversing with someone else. Save that for breaks or when you have social gatherings with colleagues away from work.

4. Learn your scripts

If your role involves cold calls, scripts can make it easier to give every person you call a consistent experience. Taking time to memorize your scripts could bring you confidence that helps curb the natural anxiety that can arise when calling strangers. But, leave room for improvisation, too.

People will pose various questions based on the information you give them and the queries will change depending on if you're asking for donations, selling season passes for the college's football games or fielding queries from prospective students.

Think of your script as a foundation that helps you feel well-equipped for any people you encounter on the phone during a shift. Then, use your judgment to give supplementary information that makes the individuals feel informed about the products associated with you or your campus.

5. Focus on the positives

When call center employees get overwhelmed, it's common for them to focus exclusively on the bad parts of the job. However, student call center workers benefit universities and those employees get benefits, too.

For example, an employer at your university may be more understanding of your class schedule than someone associated with the local community. Flexibility is a mutual benefit both for people who work at call centers and those who need their services. Plus, being in a student call center lets you become an ambassador of sorts for your college.

Those are just a couple of ideas of things you can recall if you start to feel discouraged. Your perspective shapes your outlook and everyone needs a reminder of that from time to time — especially when the phone lines are busy and you're not having the kind of success you'd hoped for during a given shift.

6. Think of something that makes you happy before dialing a number

Working in a call center means people can't assess your non-verbal communication. They only hear your voice, so it's useful to learn how to sound better over the phone. One of the easiest tricks is to think of something pleasant before you dial a person's number. Maybe you'll call your favorite vacation spot to mind or the adorable face of your faithful pet to put a smile on your face.

No matter what kind of mental image you choose, it should be powerful enough to help you sound enthusiastic to the caller and feel uplifted overall.

7. Be honest with your supervisor

You'll likely get to a point in your student call center career where it becomes clear something isn't working. It could be that your hourly quota is too high and makes you feel so rushed that people think you're impatient with them. Or, maybe you believe more training would help you improve your performance.

In any case, it's up to you to mention those things and specify how your superior could help.

8. Give yourself time to decompress after work

A shift that goes well can still have some down moments. That's why it's a good idea to set aside a period after work you can use to clear your head and process the events you experienced. You might take a walk while doing so or let yourself mull over the day doing something you enjoy, like cooking or art.

Experiment with these survival strategies!

You undoubtedly have things you do to get through other challenging parts of the college experience. You can ponder these possibilities as well to increase the likelihood of having the best possible experience as a university call center worker.

Popular Right Now

To The Person Who Feels Suicidal But Doesn't Want To Die

Suicidal thoughts are not black and white.
2644391
views

Everyone assumes that if you have suicidal thoughts that means you want to die.

From an outside perspective, suicidal thoughts are rarely looked into deeper than the surface level. Either you have suicidal thoughts and you want to die, or you don't have suicidal thoughts and you want to live. What most people don't understand is that people live in between those two statements, I for one am one of them.

I've had suicidal thoughts since I was a kid.

My first recollection of it was when I came home after school one day and got in trouble, and while I was just sitting in the dining room I kept thinking, “I wonder what it would be like to take a knife from the kitchen and just shove it into my stomach." I didn't want to die, or even hurt myself for that matter. But those thoughts haven't stopped since.

I've thought about going into the bathroom and taking every single pill I could find and just drifting to sleep and never waking back up, I've thought about hurting myself to take the pain away, just a few days ago on my way to work I thought about driving my car straight into a tree. But I didn't. Why? Because even though that urge was so strong, I didn't want to die. I still don't, I don't want my life to end.

I don't think I've ever told anyone about these feelings. I don't want others to worry because the first thing anyone thinks when you tell them you have thoughts about hurting or killing yourself is that you're absolutely going to do it and they begin to panic. Yes, I have suicidal thoughts, but I don't want to die.

It's a confusing feeling, it's a scary feeling.

When the depression takes over you feel like you aren't in control. It's like you're drowning.

Every bad memory, every single thing that hurt you, every bad thing you've ever done comes back and grabs you by the ankle and drags you back under the water just as you're about the reach the surface. It's suffocating and not being able to do anything about it.

The hardest part is you never know when these thoughts are going to come. Some days you're just so happy and can't believe how good your life is, and the very next day you could be alone in a dark room unable to see because of the tears welling up in your eyes and thinking you'd be better off dead.

You feel alone, you feel like a burden to everyone around you, you feel like the world would be better off without you. I wish it was something I could just turn off but I can't, no matter how hard I try.

These feelings come in waves.

It feels like you're swimming and the sun is shining and you're having a great time until a wave comes and sucks you under into the darkness of the water. No matter how hard you try to reach the surface again a new wave comes and hits you back under again, and again, and again.

And then it just stops.

But you never know when the next wave is going to come. You never know when you're going to be sucked back under.

I always wondered if I was the only one like this.

It didn't make any sense to me, how did I think about suicide so often but not want to die? But I was thinking about it in black and white, I thought I wasn't allowed to have those feelings since I wasn't going to act on them. But then I read articles much like this one and I realized I'm not the only one. Suicidal thoughts aren't black and white, and my feelings are valid.

To everyone who feels this way, you aren't alone.

I thought I was for the longest time, I thought I was the only one who felt this way and I didn't understand how I could feel this way. But please, I implore you to talk to someone, anyone, about the way you're feeling, whether it be a family member, significant other, a friend, a therapist.

My biggest mistake all these years was never telling anyone how I feel in fear that they would either brush me off because “who could be suicidal but not want to die?" or panic and try to commit me to a hospital or something. Writing this article has been the greatest feeling of relief I've felt in a long time, talking about it helps. I know it's scary to tell people how you're feeling, but you're not alone and you don't have to go through this alone.

Suicidal thoughts aren't black and white, your feelings are valid, and there are people here for you. You are not alone.

If you or someone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline — 1-800-273-8255


Cover Image Credit: BengaliClicker

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

5 Reasons Why Staying At College For The Summer Is The Ultimate Power Move

No school, no rules, summer vacation at the best place on Earth, also known as college.

621
views

As summer begins, it brings in the joy of no more school but for most what summer really brings is the sad realization that we have to leave our favorite place and go back to our boring home town with none of our new best friends. Although some have decided to stay at college for the summer and they will soon realize why this will be the best choice that they will be making all summer.

1. NO PARENTS 

What's better than no school, warm weather, and most importantly no one to say, "Are you just going to sleep till 2:30 p.m. every day this summer?"

1. It's like the weekend, but every day

Do you know what weekends felt like during the school year when you didn't have anything to do? No? You never had any free weekends? Wow, I'm so sorry. Well, imagine a weekend that you didn't have to do anything. Now multiply that one weekend by seven and you get seven Saturday like days where you do not have a single care in the world.

3. No "Go cut the grass!"

For the sons, you know that annoying time every week when your dad is going to say, "Go cut the grass." There is nothing you can do to get out of it. Well, staying at school for the summer means no more nagging. You get to choose what you do now.

4. The bond of friendship

The friends you make when you stay at college for the summer are different than any other bond. Mostly because you all don't have a care in the world since it's summer in your favorite place. It's a right of passage to call someone your summer college best friends. These are best friends that words wouldn't do justice.

5. The townies

Everybody always wonders what happens to a college town when all the college kids go home. Well, the townies come back in full swing and take their town back. If you stay at your college, you get to experience what most can't even describe in words. To the one mid-40s guy trying to relive his glory days. To the old men hitting on the college girls at the local pub. To the weird towny creatures that make you shiver with fright as you drive past them. Have fun townies, you only have three months.

That dream of "I wish I could just stay here at college with all these people but have no responsibilities" is finally coming true.

Related Content

Facebook Comments