7 Struggles Of Being A Sports Fanatic: Girl Edition

7 Struggles Of Being A Sports Fanatic: Girl Edition

No, I don't know the blood type of the Yankees' GM in 1976.

195
views

Being a woman in a male-dominated world is a struggle within itself. I can spend countless hours talking about how difficult women have it sometimes. We're just constantly subjected This isn't a cry for help, but simply some female sports fanatics like myself can relate to.

1. Getting Quizzed

Men assume that we know next to nothing about a sport and then go on to ask us trivia that no one knows the answer to. Guys LOVE to quiz you on the dumbest statistics. Stop being shallow, guys. Nobody knows the blood type of the Yankees' GM in 1976. I hate being asked questions like this. These type of questions just further prove that the general population of men want to undermine women's knowledge of sports. It just further proves my point that guys won't accept that girls can be sports fanatics too.

2. They think we do it for attention. 

  1. Okay, I'll admit some of us girls go to sporting events with absolutely no knowledge of what's happening for a couple of hours straight. BUT, some of us live for football, basketball, and baseball. We are truly passionate about the sport itself. You know how guys get obsessed over Sunday Night Football? That was my best friend and I sitting in the lounge every Sunday with chips and queso (Tostitos, if you're reading this please sponsor me), getting pumped up for the game.

3. Ugh, a cheerleader?

Hannah Williamson

They assume that because I cheer, I'm standing there shaking my pom poms not knowing what the hell is going on. This isn't even a fair assumption. This is false. I've literally held practice for my teammates who embodied that exact trait to teach them about football. KNOW what you're cheering for. I become louder than the coach sometimes. I get really passionate and it's hard to keep a smile on my face when it's 4th and 1 and the quarterback decides to throw the ball. RUN. IT.

4. Not having Opinions


Yes, we will have insightful comments about players and games. I've spent my fair share of time arguing with some NBA accounts on Twitter. Maybe not my highest point, but I certainly regret nothing.

5. Bandwagoner?

We aren't just bandwagon fans. Yes, my best friend is a Warriors fan and I have a really tough time dealing (send prayers) with that, but we're here to compete! We're not Rockets fans because Chris Paul is a stud, we don't root for the Giants because Odell has cool dance moves. Our opinions are formulated just as everyone else's are. I grew up a Knicks fan because of my family. When I started immersing myself in the sport of basketball, I grew a love for OKC. Now, this doesn't mean I am going to know the roster of the Supersonics in 2001. Please forgive me, I was ONE YEAR OLD.

​THE APPAREL.

Why is everything I reach for pink and glittery? I remember as a kid always wearing bedazzled Giants jerseys. Okay fine, I was a girly girl, but once in a while, it's nice to have the ACTUAL thing. At this point, I've given up and started to opt for men's clothing.

Scientific Evidence is NOT key.

Well, I better back everything up with scientific evidence or it's just: false. Thanks, guys, for not validating my opinions! We've all heard "LeBron's the goat," and we all just accept it and move on, (It's obviously true, but everyone's entitled to their own wrong opinion). However, if I said it, I'd have to back it up with the top 10 plays from each season of 15 season career and get busted for him being 3-5 in the Finals. I give up.

Popular Right Now

Why An Athlete Is Not Defined By Their Level

Pressure can drive athletes crazy.
23612
views

With tryout season among us, it is so important that this be addressed before the teams for this upcoming year are formed.

So many athletes that tryout, don't make the team they want and either quit to "take a year off" or jump ship to a gym that promises them to place the athlete on a higher level. I know that every athlete wants to be on level 5 team, the division is the most prestigious of all of them, especially because going to worlds is the end game for most athletes.

The problem these days in the cheerleading world is that our athletes are trying to level up at a rate that is just not quite realistic. If an athlete is on a level 1 team, the chances of her being on level 4 next year are slim. It is necessary for athletes to experience each level for at least a year to learn all of the fundamentals of the level and build on them for their foundation as an athlete to be more concrete. This produces the best athlete possible.

A lot of athletes think that all that they need to jump levels is tumbling and that is just not the case. When teams are formed, coaches take a look at many different things, these qualities include but are not limited to: mental toughness, dedication, tumbling, stunting abilities, pace of learning, dance and attitude.

Contrary to popular belief, there are so many factors that go into forming a team. This team not only has to be suitable for individual athletes but putting a team together is like a puzzle and as coaches we have to put a team together that will work well and have all the necessary percentages of skills to be competitive in their division.

We are concerned about building well-rounded athletes, not an athlete that is only capable in one facet of cheerleading. Some athletes are great level-4 tumblers but have level-2 stunt ability and those two will not equal a level 4 athlete until we boost the stunting ability of said athlete.

Putting an athlete on a team to just tumble is doing a disservice to not just the team, but also the athletes themselves. If this athlete joins a level 4 team to just tumble all year, when their tumbling progresses to that of a level 5 athlete, they will still have level 2 stunting skills and won't be put to good use when they are level 5 eligible. A well-rounded athlete is the kind of athlete that wins Worlds.

SEE ALSO: To The Coach That Took My Confidence Away

When athletes take their time and learn their level, they are not just learning completely new skills each year, but building on them. If done correctly, each year an athlete should improve on all points of cheerleading and not just one. The rules in each level lead to progressions for the level that it directly follows, so that athletes can safely learn skills by going up the ladder one step at a time.

What most don't realize is that skipping steps is such an unnecessary practice. If Susie stays on level 2 for an extra year, she is not "learning nothing", she is improving on the skills that she didn't quite execute completely the year before, this will perfect her performance in this level and give a more solid foundation for her to build on when she is on a level 3 team.

Pressure can drive athletes crazy. Parents, your athletes have so many years ahead of them to be on a level 5 team and go to worlds, so pushing for a 10-year-old, that is just not ready, to be on a level 4 team is unreasonable. Let your 10-year-old learn maturity and mental toughness at a level that is more appropriate, when your athlete is pushing herself too hard it takes the fun out of the tryout process and creates unnecessary stress on the athletes.

Lastly, please be sure to support whatever decision your coaches make for your athlete's placement, they know your child and they are not trying to hurt their pride, but build them up so they can accomplish all of their goals as an athlete. Know that the level your kid makes this year doesn't define him or her as an athlete, but helps them grow into the cheerleader they have the ability to become!

Cover Image Credit: National Cheerleaders Association

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

The First Time My Mistakes No Longer Controlled My Life

Mistakes suck, and though I've conquered a few, I'm still learning.

292
views

The whistle blows as the team cheers on.

My heart pounds as if it will burst out of my chest at any given moment and I taste the salty sweat trickling down my face. I must serve over the net, I must get it in, I must ace my opponent or I will fail. Fear.

In his first inaugural speech, President Franklin D. Roosevelt famously stated, "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself." Such a statement proves powerful to the matured minds of society; however, in the minds of some adolescents, this declaration appears somewhat foolish, as numerous "threats" ignite fear, thus causing teens to grow anxious.

A major cause for fear in the rising generation takes form in failure. In the eyes of these people, making a simple mistake paves the way towards absolute failure; therefore, perfectionists constantly walk on eggshells attempting to do the impossible: avoid human error. This mentality gives way to constant stress and overall disappointment, as perfection does not apply to human beings. If one can come to the realization that not one person can attain perfection, they can choose to live life in ease, for they no longer have to apply constant pressure upon themselves to master excellence. The fear of failure will no longer encumber their existence, and they can overcome situations that initially brought great anxiety. I too once put great pressure on myself to maintain perfection, and as a result, felt constantly burdened by my mistakes. However, when I realized the inevitability of those mistakes, it opened the door for great opportunities. The first time I recognized that failure serves as a tool for growth allowed me to no longer fear my mistakes, and instead utilize them for my own personal growth.

The whistle blows as the team cheers on. My heart pounds as if it will burst out of my chest at any given moment, and I taste the salty sweat trickling down my face. I must serve over the net, I must get it in, I must ace my opponent. As hard as I try, I fail; as the ball flies straight into the net and thuds obnoxiously onto the gym floor, so does my confidence. I feel utter defeat, as I know my fate. My eyes water as my coach immediately pulls me from the game, sits me on the bench, and tells me to "get my head into the game" instead of dwindling on past errors. From then on I rarely step foot on the court, and instead, ride the bench for the remainder of the season. I feel defeated. However, life does not end, and much to my surprise, this mistake does not cause failure in every aspect of my life. Over time, I gradually realize that life does not end just because of failure. Instead, mistakes and failure pave the way toward emotional development and allows one to build character. In recognizing that simple slip-ups do not lead to utter failure, I gain perspective: one's single mistake does not cause their final downfall. Thus, this epiphany allowed for my mental growth and led me to overcome once challenging obstacles.

Instead of viewing mistakes as burdens, one should utilize them as motivation for future endeavors. The lesson proves simple: all can learn from their mistakes. However, it is a matter of choosing to learn from these mistakes that decide one's future growth. Instead of pushing faults away, I now acknowledge them in order to progress. Before coming to such a realization, I constantly "played it safe" in sports, fearing that giving my best effort would lead to greater error. I did not try, and as a result, I rarely failed.

Although such a mentality brought forth limited loss in terms of overall team success, it also brought forth limited, individual success. Today, fear of failure no longer controls life on the court. I use my mistakes as motivation to get better; instead of dwindling on an error made five minutes prior, I focus on the form needed to correct it. As a result, skills will constantly improve, instead of regress. Thus, errors serve as blessings, as it is through these errors in which one can possess the motivation to better themselves.

For some, fear acts as an ever-present force that controls every aspect of life. In particular, the fear of failure encumbers perfectionists, as the mere thought of failing causes great anxieties. In the past, I have fell victim to the fear of committing a mistake, and as a result, could not go through life without feeling an overwhelming sense of defeat. However, in a moment of what appeared to be a great failure, I finally recognized that life does not end due to one mistake, let alone one million. Instead, mistakes pave the way toward personal development and provide essential motivation to succeed in everyday life. Without mistakes, it proves difficult to grow in character. One must first learn to accept their faults before they can appreciate their best qualities. Thus, the fear of failure inhibits the growth of an individual; therefore, all must come to the realization that essentialness of mistakes, as they allow for the further development of overall character.

Related Content

Facebook Comments