Remember The Word Transgender, Trump

Remember The Word Transgender, Trump

You lied to the LGBTQ community, and sadly no one is surprised

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As everyone has seen in the news lately, Trump's administration is currently attempting to define the word 'Transgender' out of existence.

To explain a bit more, they're considerably narrowing the definition of gender to only be the biological and immutable genitalia determined only at or before birth. The agency is proposing a definition that would define gender as strictly only male or female with no allowance of changing unless clarified by genetic testing.

So in other words, whatever you're born with is what you're stuck with regardless of who you feel you really are.

This is a huge backtrack to where we were as a country during the Obama administration. His administration was able to loosen the legal concept of gender in both federal education and health care programs, allowing an individual the choice on what gender they chose to identify with, regardless of their biology.

Conservatives were angry with this as it prompted fights over bathrooms and dormitories and many other places previously defined by gender. They've also already attempted to ban transgender people from serving in the military, and now they're threatening their civil rights.

If you recall back to June of 2016, Mr. Trump tweeted thanking the LGBT community for their support and stated that "I will fight for you while Hillary brings in more people that will threaten your freedoms and beliefs." Where's that support now? Because last I checked, he's practically banning the transgender population from even existing.


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If this definition actually goes through, 1.4 million Americans that have chosen to label themselves as transgender by surgery or not will longer be able to call themselves transgender. After years of fighting for civil rights and protections for the trans and non-gender conforming community through the court system, this new administration could destroy that all.

Currently, gender is defined as more of a feeling or emotion, along with sex being the more separate and medical term. The medical system recognizes that no single aspect of gender defines a persons gender identity, their internal sense of gender, which very well does not have to match the sex assigned to them at birth.

Right now, Title IX states that no person shall be subjected to discrimination in any educational program or activity based on sex. There is no definition for 'sex' or 'discrimination', but during the Obama administration it was intended to protect what Congress believed was morally right, and at the time that was the civil protection of those identifying as transgender or non-gender conforming.

Sadly, this news isn't all that shocking as it is outraging as Trump has continuously let down community after community of people. Between the outrageous comments, he makes about women and now this, who knows what's next. What I do know, however, is that the LGBTQ community isn't one to give up easily, especially with so many continuous supporters.

So thank you, Trump, for letting everyone down once again.

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Things To Know, From a Gray-Asexual

Gray-asexual is often confusing, so here's some clarification.
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So, as some of you might know, I am Gray-Asexual. This is a form of asexuality that is noted by normally not experiencing sexual attraction towards others, but may experiencing it every once in a while. This is often misunderstood, as well as asexuality in general. So I’d like to clear somethings up.

1. Being asexual does not mean I am celibate.

Being asexual does not mean I am simply abstaining from having sex or simply haven’t found the right person yet. It means I do not experience sexual attraction towards others and I do not actively desire to have sex with others.


2. Being Gray-Asexual does not mean I am actually just heterosexual.

I have been told before that I am not actually a form of asexual. That I am a heterosexual with a low sex drive. This is unfair as it essentially demeans and erases my sexuality. I am asexual though, I also have (in the past once) experienced sexual attraction towards other, but don’t normally feel sexual attraction towards anyone in general.

3. Being asexual doesn’t mean I don't have a sex drive.

Being asexual does not mean you lack a sex drive. You can have a sex drive and be ace. You want to have sex, however, you don’t feel sexually attracted to anyone. It also doesn’t mean you can’t watch porn. You can watch it and enjoy it for the release it gives you, but nor feel attracted sexually towards others.

4. Asexuals come in many forms.

You have three different forms of asexuals when it comes to sex drive alone. You have Sex-repulsed asexuals, who are disgusted and have no desire to engage in sex. You have sex-neutral asexuals, who do not have positive or negative feelings towards sex, they simply don’t seek out to engage in sex, though they may engage in it at some points. And then you have sex-positive asexuals, they believe that it is healthy and normal to engage in sex, and even though they engage in it, they don’t really have sexual feelings/attraction towards others. Then you have different forms of asexuality, such as: asexual, demisexual, gray asexual, lithosexual, etc.

5. Being Asexual does not mean I don't experience romance

Being Asexual does not mean that I will not ever desire to have a girlfriend or significant other. I may one day seek out a romantic relationship. I may not. It is all up in the air and I don't know yet.

6. I am not broken.

That is something I've heard too many times about asexuals. That we are broken, because we don't desire to have sex. That we are some defective. That, in a sense, we are a lesser kind of human. All this, because we do not experience sexual attraction (or at least normally). We are told, at least I have, that I'm just a heterosexual with a low sex drive. That I will find the right person one day. That I am just confused and I'll get it figured out soon and find a nice girl to be with. That my sexual identity (which the Asexual Visibility & Education Network (AVEN) and even wikipedia recognize as real identities) don't exist. That I'm just making it up to be different. That I just want to be special. And it hurts, it makes me feel like a bad person. Like I'm broken.

7. One of the most helpful things I've been told on the internet, was by a stranger.

I had made a post in a forum about how I felt bad for identifying as gray asexual and that I was a bad person for identifying as it. And they gave me this helpful advice:

"Try to stop identifying yourself with a word or term. It is one of the biggest mistakes humans make. You are you. No need for a name or a title. The world around you is invaded with duality concepts because it causes disharmony and conflict. You will never find peace of mind when you participate in that nonsense. Just be you, offer yourself to others, love all - even the misguided , and reject the false system of mankind that tries to force everyone into a defined category."

What I got out of that was that I shouldn't care what others think of me. I should stop trying to live up to other people's standards and live my life as I see fit. I thank you, you kind stranger.



Cover Image Credit: www.io.wp.com

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​'When They See Us' Is The Tough Show Nobody Wants To Watch But Everyone Needs To

Justice was not served.

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Netflix just released a limited series called "When They See Us." The series is based on the Central Park Five. The Central Park Five were five young boys who were convicted of raping a woman jogging in Central Park on April 19, 1989. These young boys did not commit the crime they were convicted of though, they were set up by the prosecutor on the case, Linda Fairstein, along with her fellow detectives.

On April 19, 1989, a huge group of boys went out to Central Park one night "wilding." Cops came and arrested a bunch of the boys who were out. Linda Fairstein came to the scene where the rape happened, with the women attacked hanging on for her life. When Fairstein got to the precinct, immediately she said the boys in the park were the perpetrators. She had the police go out into the neighborhoods and find every young, black/Hispanic male who fit a description they drew up and brought them in for questioning.

What the detectives then did was extremely illegal.

They questioned these 14, 15 and 16-year-old boys without their parents. These boys were minors. These detectives took these boys in the rooms for questioning and started to plot a story in their head, making them say they committed the horrific crime. The boys were saying it wasn't them but the detectives would not let down. They started beating the kids until they "admitted" to this act of rape. One of the boys, Antron McCray, was with his mom and dad when they started to question him. Kevin Richardson was questioned without his mom until his sister came and was basically forced to sign the statement the detectives wrote for him so he could go home.

Yusef Salaam's mother came and got her son just before he signed his Miranda rights away. Raymond Santana was coerced by detectives for hours and hours, along with the others. Korey Wise, who was not in the police's interest at first, was taken and beaten by a detective until he agreed to the story they drew up. These boys didn't even know each other, except Yusef and Korey, and were pinning the crimes on one another because they were forced.

Donald Trump was even supportive of bringing back the death penalty for this case. He wanted the death penalty for five teenage boys. Teenagers. The boys were barely in high school and were being attacked with the death penalty.

At the trial, the lead prosecutor, Elizabeth Lederer, called in the victim of the attack, Trisha Meili. Meili had no recollection of the night after being in a coma for several days. The DNA evidence that was presented at trial did not match any of the defendants. There were no eyewitnesses. They showed the recordings of the interviews of the boys, but they were forced into telling false stories, which none of were merely similar. The case had no supporting evidence whatsoever. But the jury still convicted all five boys, who had to serve out their sentences.

The charges were exonerated in 2002 after the real rapist confessed. But exoneration does not make up for what these young boys had to go through. They were tried as adults at the ages of 14, 15 and 16. Korey Wise was in a maximum security prison at the age of 16. These boys went through something they should have never gone through at such a young age. There was no justice served for the boys or the victim. The detectives pinned a crime on five innocent young boys. These boys had been at the wrong place at the wrong time. Instead of actually working to find the real rapist, Linda Fairstein pinned it on five boys and did not do anything by the book while the boys were in question.

The show has brought back outcries about the case, even causing Linda Fairstein to step down from her charity boards. Our justice system still isn't what it should be today, and this show helps with showing us that.

The Netflix series shines a light on the racism of these detectives and the injustice that was served. Ava DuVernay did a tremendous job with this show. It is moving. The four episodes are very hard to watch, but it is so important that you do.

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