Why The University Of South Carolina Is A Superior School

6 Reasons The University Of South Carolina Is Still The Superior School

The real USC.

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After the recent loss in the annual USC vs. Clemson rivalry football game, I felt the need to explain why the University of South Carolina is still the superior school. We may not always win, but we always win.

Here are just a few of the reasons Carolina is the best school in the state.

1. Our location

Living in Downtown Columbia is definitely a plus because there is always something going on. Not only is living downtown fun but since we live in the middle of the state, trips to the beach or mountains are only a couple of hours away.

2. Tailgates

Tailgates are an all-day affair. They occur before, after, and sometimes during the game. There are also numerous places to tailgate at Carolina, whether it be a Cock a Boose or the frat lots, you're bound to have a good time.

3. Soda City, every weekend.

Small local businesses, food trucks, and other shops set up booths on Main St. every Saturday. You can buy food, jewelry, produce, flowers, and a lot more. The fun literally never stops.

4. Our mascot

Cocky is not only one of the most entertaining mascots in college football but he also participates in one of the best opening entrances for a football team. Let's not forget we have Sir Big Spur, who is the live mascot that attends every game. Saturday's in South Carolina just wouldn't be the same without them.

5. We don't wear God awful orange. 

This one is simple, no one looks good in orange. We wear garnet and black, and bleed it too.

6. The Community

Carolina is a university full of students who are there for each other and help others out when they're in need. Not only are the students nice, but the people of Columbia are also extremely welcoming. No matter where you're from, the community at the University of South Carolina makes you feel like family.

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Greek Life Does More Harm Than Good And It's Time We Canceled It

Greek Life is considered an almost essential part of campus culture, but do we really need Greek life?
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If you are a college student in the United States, you will be affected in some way by Greek life.

It doesn't matter whether you want to join or not. When you go to school, you will hear about it all the time. You will hear about which frats throw the best parties, be asked which sorority you are rushing, and see them hosting charity events. And of course, you will hear the criticisms.

It is impossible these days to not hear about the criticisms surrounding Greek life, the most common one being the high rates of sexual assault. There are also the criticisms that it promotes binge-drinking and partying, it fuels nepotism, the hazing, and there have been numerous racist incidents involving fraternities.

If you ask anybody in Greek life though, they will usually tell you these criticisms are overblown. Yes, occasionally there might be some racist jokes. Yes, sometimes a sexual assault might occur, but they will assure you that these are just a few bad apples. Then they will wax poetic about the various benefits of Greek life, how it fosters lifetime friendships, instills good values such as serving the community, and grooms young adults for professional life.

But there is another question you should ask. Who reaps these benefits?

In a study conducted by Princeton University, researchers found that at their school 77% of fraternity members and 73% of sorority members were white, despite making up 47% of the student body. Additionally, 30% and 19% of fraternity and sorority members were legacy admits, meaning they were children of alumni. Obviously, this is only one school and not necessarily reflect the entire United States. Fraternities and sororities do not publish statistics on their demographics, so it is impossible to tell exactly how pervasive this phenomenon is. Nonetheless, it is worrisome and is surprising, considering that the first fraternities were founded by the people that have always been most privileged in our country: white, upper-class men.

You do not need an extensive, university-sponsored study to understand that it is difficult for students of lower incomes to join Greek life. Not only must you maintain a certain GPA, but you must pay monthly dues in order to stay in. These can range in cost from $250 to $775, and that is not counting “new member fees" or “badge fees" that may be added to the overall cost. Additionally, members must attend regular meetings and functions. If somebody comes from a low-income family and has to work in order to make it through college, it will be significantly harder to join Greek life.

Some organizations offer payment plans, but many potential pledges still say this is not enough. This begs the question: is Greek life really creating new leaders, or is it just fostering a culture of nepotism and providing a pathway for those born into privilege to access high-paying jobs more easily? This is not to say it is impossible for someone of lesser means to join, but it is significantly harder.

In recent years, excessive drinking and hazing-related deaths have also caused Greek life to come under fire. It is not uncommon for college students to abuse alcohol, however, members of Greek life are significantly more likely to abuse alcohol. One study by Harvard found that 4 out of 5 fraternity and sorority members are binge-drinkers in comparison to 2 out of 5 overall college students.

Another study at Brown University found that fraternities are often opposed to alcohol education and intervention because they view it as an impediment to their social and sexual goals. Again, this is not to suggest that only Greek life-affiliated students binge-drink. Many college students engage in binge-drinking while they are in school, but they are much more likely to do so if they are involved in Greek life.

These are only some of the problems associated with Greek life. There are many, many more, which I will discuss in next week's article. But for now, I want readers to sit and consider the facts they have been presented with, and ask themselves the kind of mentality that Greek life promotes through its culture of exclusion and binge-drinking.

Cover Image Credit: Stephen F. Austin State University

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The Tea On The 16th Annual OSCARs Award Results

Every year, the University of Washington, Tacoma branch hosts the Outstanding Student Ceremony for Awards and Recognition (OSCARs). This year, the results would cause not only applause, but soft murmurs of questions and irritation.

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On Friday May 17 the University of Washington Tacoma held their 16th annual OSCARs award ceremony at the University YMCA at 7 p.m. and the room was filled with tables, great food and a wonderful stage. The purpose of the OSCARs is to celebrate the hard work of the students, staff and faculty that make up the University of Washington Tacoma campus. There are some categories where students are able to vote for who they think deserves the award, and there are others where the staff and faculty vote for who they think deserves the award. Nominations were accepted until April 12 at 12 p.m. and the students could vote between April 15 and April 30.

Throughout the ceremony there were cheers, laughter, hugs and pictures. But what most didn't notice were the soft murmurs humming between guests at various tables.

A few questions as the evening went on that arised from table to table were as followed;

"How many times have they gone up there?"

"Are there any new names on there? They all look the same."

"Is it just the same people over and over again?"

"Hasn't that person already won, like, three awards already?"

After attending and hearing the celebration, murmurs and noticing the names appearing on the screen becoming more and more familiar due to the repetition of the names presented, a pique of curiosity inspired some digging.

The following list were the categories provided on the OSCARs program.

OSCARs Program

A total of 29 categories had awards, recognition or certificates that were given to students only. Within some of these categories, but not all, were multiple sections of the award such as the Husky Volunteers Awards which had the Silver, Purple and Gold awards depending on the number of service hours. Within some of these categories multiple people received awards, certificates or recognition such as the ASUWT President's Award which was given to two different individuals.

In the OSCARs 29 categories there were 21 awards, one certificate and seven recognitions. Within the 29 categories there were 35 sections.

Of the 21 awards, they were given away to four groups and 76 individuals. In the certificate category, it was given to seven individuals and of the seven recognition categories 49 individuals and the graduating class of 2019 were recognized.

In total four groups received awards and 132 individuals received awards, certificates and recognition.

Of the 132 individuals that received awards, certificates and recognition 62 individuals received awards. seven received certificates, and 46 individuals received recognition.

However, the results can be broken down even further.

One individual received four awards and one recognition.

Two individuals received three awards each.

Three individuals received two awards and one recognition each.

Five individuals received two awards each.

Six individuals received one award and one recognition each.

Five people received one award and one certificate each.

One person received one award, one certificate and two recognitions.

One person received one award, one certificate and one recognition.

One person received one award and two recognitions.

Two people received two recognitions.

With that broken down, that means that out of the 132 individuals who received awards, recognition and certificates that only 38 individuals received just one award, nobody received just one certificate, and only 31 people received just one recognition.

To see the difference, 69 out of 132 students received one award or recognition and 27 out of 132 students received more than one award, recognition, certificate or some combination. Or about 52 percent of the individuals received one award or recognition and about 20 percent received more than one award, recognition, certificate or some combination.

While the decisions are final and carefully made, the ceremony was beautiful and overall a fun celebration of student and staff success. However, the repetitiveness of the nominees and individuals that had received a combination of multiple awards, recognitions and certificates had some audience members confused, baffled and irritated leaving them with questions rather than a sense of celebratory satisfaction.

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