Random Teacher Experiences

These 5 Random Teacher Experiences Make Me Want To Teach Even More Now

"I will leave random fake keys laying around when I'm bored."

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Teaching is something that I've been trying to do ever since I got into college. Teaching can open up many new horizons in education and understanding in the field we choose to teach (biology, psychology, English, etc.) I decided to ask a couple of teachers (on Quora as an anonymous user) about their experience with students cheating on exams/assignments. I couldn't be more excited by the results, and even more excited by the experiences shared. The teachers' names will remain anonymous.

1. That's the key

"On accident one time I left my key out for an exam. The thing was, I used bubble sheets. But I had grabbed a random one, and wrote key on it, for the unit four exam for trigonometry.

Problem was, the bubble sheet was an extra from the unit three exam for geometry they were going to take next class. It said 'Unit 3: Geometry' on the top along with my handwritten 'Key.' A kid saw it on my desk, copied it, and shared it to his buddies that he had the unit three exam.

Test day came, and a ton of kids got a 24% (12 out of 50). I was curious, then realized that their pattern matched my key for trig exactly. So I accidentally caught 42 students willing to cheat.

Since then, I will leave random fake keys laying around when I am bored. They are keyed to 10-50% just to mess with the cheaters."—Teacher 1

2. The monster in the cage

"Not a cute mistake, but an awesome one. For a writing assignment, I gave my grade six a Cambridge Checkpoint past paper. The final written task was:

Scientists have a monster in a cage. They are in a secret underground bunker.
The military is involved and the president must be kept up to date.

Continue the story…

This girl, Celine, was not very academic. At all. Ever. But she was a sweet girl and I wanted her to do well. In her story she wrote:

The monster was in the cage. The scientists were all around the cage staring in at the monster… and I stared back.

AND I STARED BACK?! Holy crap, that's awesome! This grade six had some incredibly smart students yet none of them had put in a twist like that. I read that bit to the whole class and they were shocked and delighted. Immediately after I read '… and I stared back,' the class was shocked into silence. They then burst into applause for this shy little girl who had put in a twist and an amazing perspective.

The mistake was… she had meant to write 'it' instead of I. I knew this but I wanted her to enjoy being the best in class, even if it was just for a short while."—Teacher 2

3. Capital letters

"I was teaching a class of 15- and 16-year-olds who struggle with English. We were covering capital letters and when to use them:

Me: So, if we go to London... that's a place, so it needs...?
Class: A capital letter!
Me: Fantastic! And if we go to the British Museum, it's a place, so it needs...?
Class: A capital letter!
Me: Great stuff! And if we go to London Zoo? What does London Zoo need?
Class: Animals!




I loved that class."—Teacher 3

4. "Myseled"

"I give the runners that I coach a written evaluation after each race. Course marshals sent my athletes the wrong way at one race back in 1999, and one of my senior girls got very upset about it. For her evaluation, I noted that she had gotten misled (pronounced as miss-led). She found me in the hallway the next day and asked what 'mysel-ed' means. I have never forgotten that moment, and to this day I pronounce 'misled' as 'myseled.' The word just sounds funny to me.

Today, I kid you not, I read an essay in which an eleventh-grade girl wrote, 'Americans, nomader how hard they try, cannot determine their own destiny.' She meant 'no matter.' I love stuff like this!"—Teacher 4

5. Glasses

"I was sitting on a chair. The class was sitting on the floor around me, coming to a conclusion about something. Suddenly one of those eight-year-olds said to me, "Sir, can I try your glasses on?"

I don't know why I agreed. I hate being without them because I have such bad eyesight, but somehow his curiosity got the better of me, and I wanted to show I trusted him, I suppose. A bit of sharing before the next part of the lesson…

So I handed the heavy lenses to him, asking him to be careful. And reassuring me that he would, he fitted the now oversized frames onto his face.

First, he blinked hard, then looked around the classroom, squinting. Then he stood up and tried looking out the window. Then he sat down again, solemnly taking them off and handing them back with great care.

"Cor, blimey," he said. "You must have really good eyesight to be able to see through them glasses."

I think I went up in his estimation."—Teacher 5

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Let's Talk More About Lori Laughlin Facing Up To 20 Years In Prison When Brock Turner Got 6 Months

And he was released three months early for 'good behavior'... after sexually assaulting an unconscious girl behind a dumpster.

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To start, Lori Laughlin messed up royally, and I don't condone her actions.

If you live under a rock and are unaware of what happened to the "Full House" star, here's the tea:

Lori Laughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli — and like 50 other celebrity parents — were found guilty of conspiracy to commit fraud, and paid a $1 million bail on conspiracy to commit mail fraud, and honest services fraud. You don't need to know what these mean except that she paid $500,000 to get her two daughters, Bella and Olivia Jade Giannulli.

I know you're wondering why they did it — tbh I am too — however, these parents paid the University of Southern California to give admission to her daughters in through the rowing team on campus, despite neither one of them actually playing the sport ever in their life.

Yeah, Aunt Becky messed up and should face punishment, but why is she facing up 20 years when men like Brock Turner are sentenced only six months for raping an unconscious woman behind a dumpster at Stanford?

I hate to bring up the gender card, but I'm pulling it: Why is Lori Laughlin — a woman who with bad judgement who used money to give an upper-hand to her entitled daughters — face more prison time than a man who willingly raped a woman who wasn't in a right state of mine (or any at all!) behind a dumpster of all places.

The answer? Because the system is a mess.

Yeah, Aunt Becky paid for her daughters to get into a school, giving disadvantages to students actually deserving and wanting to attend a college. Her act was immoral, and ultimately selfish, but it doesn't even compare to what Brock Turner did, and it doesn't even effect others as much his rape survivor.

The most that will happen to the Giannulli girls is an expulsion and a temporary poor reputation, however, Emily Doe (the alias of the survivor) will feel the consequences of the attack forever.

There should have been a switch:

Lori Laughlin and the Target guy should have had to pay other students tuition/student debt while facing prison time, while Brock Turner should have had to face over 20 years with more consequences.

But, that'll never happen because our system sucks and society is rigged. I guess our society would prefer a rapist walking around more so a woman who made a poor choice by paying for her daughters to go to a college.

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Teaching Is An Amazing Career, It's More Powerful Than We Give It Credit For

Teaching is a career that is heavily overlooked — it is much more powerful than people realize.

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When it comes to teaching, it's not always easy or fun. But, let me ask you this: what career really is easy or fun all the time? Being challenged can beneficial. Otherwise, you are just going through the same routine over and over. Teaching will definitely keep you on your toes because there's always something happening.

People seem to think teachers just lecture on information that they hope their students remember for the test. You know what? Those people are dead wrong. Teaching is more than that. Teaching means having the passion and drive to educate children. Teaching is turning something dull to something that students will find more interesting and enjoyable.

Teaching is also about providing tools and other resources for students in order for them to succeed, especially the ones who tend to struggle in school. Being able to give those tools to help them accomplish their goals is extremely rewarding. A teacher will work with a student who is behind on his/her reading skills to have him/her be right at the level he/she needs to be by the end of the school year. Not many jobs provide a reward quite like guiding a student, if not more, to success.

Although it focuses on academics, teaching is not just about that. Sure, being an effective teacher is key, but there are other aspects that are just as significant. As a teacher, you also have to connect with your students. Knowing your students on a personal level is so important. The connection can build respect that will, in turn, help them to succeed. Plus, students spend more time with you on a day-to-day basis than they do with their parents — isn't that frightening? So, you have to be able to support them and let them know them that you are there for them if they are having trouble.

Additionally, that connection you build with your students can last a lifetime. You can witness the growth of a student right in front of you. In fact, I am still very close with some of my teachers from elementary school. Many of them inspired me to become a teacher. Because of those great bonds I built, I had the opportunity to intern with some of my past teachers, which was a rewarding experience for everyone. Being able to develop such a connection with someone so different in age is something that is so powerful and that doesn't come with many other careers.

Teaching is so amazing. There are so many layers and beautiful aspects to it. Again, it can be difficult, but it's also a lot of fun. Not many people can say they have fun and laugh every day at work. I also truly believe that not many other people can say their careers provide as rewarding of a feeling as teaching does. To be able to make such a difference in someone's life is an incredible thing. Teaching is my passion. I know teaching will not be only gratifying but something that will bring me pure joy.

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