To The Girl Who Said I Can't Put 'Spoiled' On My Resume, Take 'Bitter' Off Yours

To The Girl Who Said I Can't Put 'Spoiled' On My Resume, Take 'Bitter' Off Yours

Sure, I can't put being spoiled on my resume... but you can't put being bitter on yours, either.
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Before I start, let me get something straight. I'm not spoiled, but I am well taken care of.

I'm sorry that the fact that my father pays my college tuition in full and wants me to have as much study time as possible "infuriates" you.

So, let me enlighten you, my parents providing for me in college doesn't define my character.

While I'm home during the summer, I work. We have a farm and a family business. I also umpire and work at other local places. So, trust me, I know the meaning of hard work and money just as well as you and the next guy.

You've had a job since you were 16 years old, I've had a job since I was 14 years old. But my "Mommy and Daddy" pay for a majority of the things I do. Especially my needs.

I worked Fridays and Saturday nights, too, but I also had enough free time to go to football games and hang out with my friends while I was in high school.

I must ask you this... why are you upset that kids have parents who give them everything? I'll be honest, when I have kids and a family I'm going to bust my butt to make sure my kids are happy and have everything they need to be successful.

They won't miss out on high school experiences to work some 4-10 job at Subway for their entire high school career. They'll be too busy enjoying the tail end of their childhood, playing sports, participating in the yearbook club, the mathlete club, or whatever it may be that they want to join.

My goal in life is to be as financially stable as possible, so if I want to buy my kids concert tickets, name brand clothes, or give them a few extra dollars for getting good grades... you best believe I am going to.

Kids are allowed to be stressed about things, no matter what it is. Telling someone what they can and cannot be upset about, or measuring the difficulty of their life by what it looks like, isn't fair. Maybe they aren't working an 8-hour shift and waking up at 5 a.m. to get ready for school the next day, but they may be studying as hard as they can for a test, getting a sufficient amount of rest to play in a game the next day (a game that could potentially pay for their college career), or struggling with something else outside of school that you are totally unaware of.

Don't shame me or anyone else because we are well-supported by our parents. There is nothing wrong with that whatsoever. That's what parents are supposed to do. If it wasn't for the great parenting that I had growing up, especially in my last two years of high school, I wouldn't be who I am today — a successful, hardworking, college-attending young woman. I learned to have self-discipline, manners, and respect at a young age... the amount of money that my parents supplied me with had nothing to do with it.

So sure, I cannot put "spoiled" on my resume for previous job experience... but I can say that you can't put being bitter on yours, either.

Cover Image Credit: Macey Mullins

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Working With People Who Are Dying Teaches You So Much About How To Live

Spending time with hospice patients taught me about the art of dying.

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Death is a difficult subject.

It is addressed differently across cultures, lifestyles, and religions, and it can be difficult to find the right words to say when in the company of someone who is dying. I have spent a lot of time working with hospice patients, and I bore witness to the varying degrees of memory loss and cognitive decline that accompany aging and disease.

The patients I worked with had diverse stories and interests, and although we might have had some trouble understanding each other, we found ways to communicate that transcended any typical conversation.

I especially learned a lot from patients severely affected by dementia.

They spoke in riddles, but their emotions were clearly communicated through their facial expressions and general demeanor, which told a story all on their own.

We would connect through smiles and short phrases, yes or no questions, but more often than not, their minds were in another place. Some patients would repeat the details of the same event, over and over, with varying levels of detail each time.

Others would revert to a child-like state, wondering about their parents, about school, and about family and friends they hadn't seen in a long time.

I often wondered why their minds chose to wander to a certain event or time period and leave them stranded there before the end of their life. Was an emotionally salient event reinforcing itself in their memories?

Was their subconscious trying to reconnect with people from their past? All I could do was agree and follow their lead because the last thing I wanted to do was break their pleasant memory.

I felt honored to be able to spend time with them, but I couldn't shake the feeling that I was intruding on their final moments, moments that might be better spent with family and loved ones. I didn't know them in their life, so I wondered how they benefited from my presence in their death.

However, after learning that several of the patients I visited didn't have anyone to come to see them, I began to cherish every moment spent, whether it was in laughter or in tears. Several of the patients never remembered me. Each week, I was a new person, and each week they had a different variation of the same story that they needed to tell me.

In a way, it might have made it easier to start fresh every week rather than to grow attached to a person they would soon leave.

Usually, the stories were light-hearted.

They were reliving a memory or experiencing life again as if it were the first time, but as the end draws nearer, a drastic shift in mood and demeanor is evident.

A patient who was once friendly and jolly can quickly become quiet, reflective, and despondent. I've seen patients break down and cry, not because of their current situation, but because they were mourning old ones. These times taught me a lot about how to be just what that person needs towards the end of their life.

I didn't need to understand why they were upset or what they wanted to say.

The somber tone and tired eyes let me know that what they had to say was important and worth hearing. What mattered most is that someone who cared was there to hear it.

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5 Reasons Why Staying At College For The Summer Is The Ultimate Power Move

No school, no rules, summer vacation at the best place on Earth, also known as college.

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As summer begins, it brings in the joy of no more school but for most what summer really brings is the sad realization that we have to leave our favorite place and go back to our boring home town with none of our new best friends. Although some have decided to stay at college for the summer and they will soon realize why this will be the best choice that they will be making all summer.

1. NO PARENTS 

What's better than no school, warm weather, and most importantly no one to say, "Are you just going to sleep till 2:30 p.m. every day this summer?"

1. It's like the weekend, but every day

Do you know what weekends felt like during the school year when you didn't have anything to do? No? You never had any free weekends? Wow, I'm so sorry. Well, imagine a weekend that you didn't have to do anything. Now multiply that one weekend by seven and you get seven Saturday like days where you do not have a single care in the world.

3. No "Go cut the grass!"

For the sons, you know that annoying time every week when your dad is going to say, "Go cut the grass." There is nothing you can do to get out of it. Well, staying at school for the summer means no more nagging. You get to choose what you do now.

4. The bond of friendship

The friends you make when you stay at college for the summer are different than any other bond. Mostly because you all don't have a care in the world since it's summer in your favorite place. It's a right of passage to call someone your summer college best friends. These are best friends that words wouldn't do justice.

5. The townies

Everybody always wonders what happens to a college town when all the college kids go home. Well, the townies come back in full swing and take their town back. If you stay at your college, you get to experience what most can't even describe in words. To the one mid-40s guy trying to relive his glory days. To the old men hitting on the college girls at the local pub. To the weird towny creatures that make you shiver with fright as you drive past them. Have fun townies, you only have three months.

That dream of "I wish I could just stay here at college with all these people but have no responsibilities" is finally coming true.

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