To The Girl Who Said I Can't Put 'Spoiled' On My Resume, Take 'Bitter' Off Yours

To The Girl Who Said I Can't Put 'Spoiled' On My Resume, Take 'Bitter' Off Yours

Sure, I can't put being spoiled on my resume... but you can't put being bitter on yours, either.
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Before I start, let me get something straight. I'm not spoiled, but I am well taken care of.

I'm sorry that the fact that my father pays my college tuition in full and wants me to have as much study time as possible "infuriates" you.

So, let me enlighten you, my parents providing for me in college doesn't define my character.

While I'm home during the summer, I work. We have a farm and a family business. I also umpire and work at other local places. So, trust me, I know the meaning of hard work and money just as well as you and the next guy.

You've had a job since you were 16 years old, I've had a job since I was 14 years old. But my "Mommy and Daddy" pay for a majority of the things I do. Especially my needs.

I worked Fridays and Saturday nights, too, but I also had enough free time to go to football games and hang out with my friends while I was in high school.

I must ask you this... why are you upset that kids have parents who give them everything? I'll be honest, when I have kids and a family I'm going to bust my butt to make sure my kids are happy and have everything they need to be successful.

They won't miss out on high school experiences to work some 4-10 job at Subway for their entire high school career. They'll be too busy enjoying the tail end of their childhood, playing sports, participating in the yearbook club, the mathlete club, or whatever it may be that they want to join.

My goal in life is to be as financially stable as possible, so if I want to buy my kids concert tickets, name brand clothes, or give them a few extra dollars for getting good grades... you best believe I am going to.

Kids are allowed to be stressed about things, no matter what it is. Telling someone what they can and cannot be upset about, or measuring the difficulty of their life by what it looks like, isn't fair. Maybe they aren't working an 8-hour shift and waking up at 5 a.m. to get ready for school the next day, but they may be studying as hard as they can for a test, getting a sufficient amount of rest to play in a game the next day (a game that could potentially pay for their college career), or struggling with something else outside of school that you are totally unaware of.

Don't shame me or anyone else because we are well-supported by our parents. There is nothing wrong with that whatsoever. That's what parents are supposed to do. If it wasn't for the great parenting that I had growing up, especially in my last two years of high school, I wouldn't be who I am today — a successful, hardworking, college-attending young woman. I learned to have self-discipline, manners, and respect at a young age... the amount of money that my parents supplied me with had nothing to do with it.

So sure, I cannot put "spoiled" on my resume for previous job experience... but I can say that you can't put being bitter on yours, either.

Cover Image Credit: Macey Mullins

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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The 7 Struggles Of Registering For College Classes

Unfortunately, no matter how much preparation you do, you're bound to run into at least a few problems.

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It's that time again. The time we decide what our schedules will look like in the Fall. If you're lucky, you'll be able to make the class list of your dreams. For some of us, this time is super stressful. Classes we need are filling up quickly and the lines at our advising offices are getting longer, not to mention registration is usually around the midterm season. One more thing we have to worry about!

Planning your schedule can be both fun and easy if you approach it the right way. Make a list of the classes you need to take to fulfill your necessary requirements before your registration window opens up. Have backup plans as well because you may not be able to get all of your first choices, especially if your window is one of the last ones. Make sure you meet the requirements of the classes you want to take. There's nothing worse than finding a class, seeing it has open spots and then realizing you don't fit the criteria.

When planning your schedule, be kind to yourself. Know what kind of person you are. For example, I know I am not a morning person. Therefore, I know that 8 a.m. classes are not my friend, so I try to avoid them if I can. If I had to be honest, 9:30 a.m. classes are even tough for me sometimes. I try to plan my classes for any time after 11 a.m. and before 8 p.m. Personally, I don't mind taking evening classes, but I know they're not for everyone. Know yourself and try to build a schedule around your needs. You'll be glad you did later!

Planning ahead will make your life a lot easier. Unfortunately, no matter how much preparation you do, you may run into a few problems. Here are 7 struggles of registering for college classes.

1. The classes you need are full.

2. The only classes left are Friday ones.

3. The class is reserved for students in the major.

4. You look up the professor on ratemyprofessors.com and don't like what you see.

5. Your registration date is one of the last ones.

6. The wait is two hours at your advising office.

7. You don't know what classes you need to take.

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