The Moss H. Kendrix Story

The Moss H. Kendrix Story

The Building Blocks of Black America
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If you are African-American, and you are an aspiring Public Relations professional like me, you need to know who Moss H. Kendrix, and what he affect he has on African-American PR professionals.

Moss Kendrix attended thee Historical Black Institution, Morehouse College in the mid 1930’s. While obtaining his degree at Morehouse he joined the Alpha Rho chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. He also showed early signs of interest of Mass Communications by joining the Universities newspaper, The Maroon Tiger, where he ultimately became the chief editor. Kednrix also helped to co-found Phi Delta Delta Journalism Society, the sole pioneering African-American Journalism society. Throughout his matriculation at Morehouse he found his passion in Mass Communications that lead to a promising and innovative career. Kednrix is considered to be one of the leading African-American fathers in the field of Mass Communications and Public Relations. He made many contributions to the industry that is still being used to this day. His contributions helped to make strides in the African-American community as well as other ethnic minorities; lastly his contributions have led many companies and brands to embrace Kendrix’s ideas to make currents advances in the field of Mass Communications and Public Relations.

Upon graduating from Morehouse College Kendrix was accepted into Howard University’s Law School in 1939, but decide to gain more work experience. Within gaining more work experience within the year of 1939 he generated the National Negro Newspaper, one of his first contributions to the mass communications industry. This recognition still remains to this day but in the form of Black Press Week, which is observed annually by the National Newspaper Publishers Association formally known as NNPA. Also within the 1939 year he married Dorothy Marie Johnson who attended Spellman College, to the union two sons were born; Moss Kendrix Jr., and Alan Kendrix. Shortly after marriage Kendrix was drafted to the United States Army in 1941, during his time of service he worked for the Treasury Department in the War Finance Office. Within his work travels across the country with African-American celebrities promoting war bonds, and often making an appearance on radio shows for the Columbia Broadcasting System network. In 1944, Kendrix became the director of Public Relations for the Republic of Liberia’s Centennial Celebration.

The Moss Kendrix Organization also came to in the year of 1944, the companies’ moto “What the Public Thinks Counts!” The Moss Kendrix Organization was established in Washington, D.C. The Moss Kendrix Organization was at the helm of several major companies accounts aimed at African-American consumers. Several of the companies that The Moss Kendrix Organization worked with were Carnation, the Nation Dental Association, the National Educational Association, Ford Motor Company, and The Coca-Cola Company. Kendrix also worked with World Wide Developers Conference formally known as WWDC, on a weekly radio program, “Profiles of Our Times.”

During the 1950’s Kendrix went to the corporate offices of Coca-Cola, in Atlanta, Georgia and pitched a proposal on how the company should market and advertise to the African-American community. Since the company was not making a good profit within the south in the African-American communities. By pitching his brilliant ideas to Coca-Cola, Kendrix was hired by the company and worked for them on a retainer. Kendrix became thee first African-American to get hold of a major corporate account.

Kendrix’s Long Living Legacy

Moss Hyles Kendrix is a pioneer not only in the field of public relations but also in the field of mass communications, but he has also left a lasting legacy on African-Americans aspiring to work in the field of public relations. During his lifetime he has created numerous amounts of public relations and advertising campaigns that advocated African-American’s to be perceptible for news media outlets, entertainers, performers and corporate clientele. Like we all know our time here on earth is short Moss Kendrix passed away in December of 1989. His legacy shall continuously inspire those with an aspiration to work in the field of public relations.

Cover Image Credit: Ego Trip Land

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30 Things I'd Rather Be Than 'Pretty'

Because "pretty" is so overrated.
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Nowadays, we put so much emphasis on our looks. We focus so much on the outside that we forget to really focus on what matters. I was inspired by a list that I found online of "Things I Would Rather Be Called Instead Of Pretty," so I made my own version. Here is a list of things that I would rather be than "pretty."

1. Captivating

I want one glance at me to completely steal your breath away.

2. Magnetic

I want people to feel drawn to me. I want something to be different about me that people recognize at first glance.

3. Raw

I want to be real. Vulnerable. Completely, genuinely myself.

4. Intoxicating

..and I want you addicted.

5. Humble

I want to recognize my abilities, but not be boastful or proud.

6. Exemplary

I want to stand out.

7. Loyal

I want to pride myself on sticking out the storm.

8. Fascinating

I want you to be hanging on every word I say.

9. Empathetic

I want to be able to feel your pain, so that I can help you heal.

10. Vivacious

I want to be the life of the party.

11. Reckless

I want to be crazy. Thrilling. Unpredictable. I want to keep you guessing, keep your heart pounding, and your blood rushing.

12. Philanthropic

I want to give.

13. Philosophical

I want to ask the tough questions that get you thinking about the purpose of our beating hearts.

14. Loving

When my name is spoken, I want my tenderness to come to mind.

15. Quaintrelle

I want my passion to ooze out of me.

16. Belesprit

I want to be quick. Witty. Always on my toes.

17. Conscientious

I want to always be thinking of others.

18. Passionate

...and I want people to know what my passions are.

19. Alluring

I want to be a woman who draws people in.

20. Kind

Simply put, I want to be pleasant and kind.

21. Selcouth

Even if you've known me your whole life, I want strange, yet marvelous. Rare and wondrous.

22. Pierian

From the way I move to the way I speak, I want to be poetic.

23. Esoteric

Do not mistake this. I do not want to be misunderstood. But rather I'd like to keep my circle small and close. I don't want to be an average, everyday person.

24. Authentic

I don't want anyone to ever question whether I am being genuine or telling the truth.

25. Novaturient

..about my own life. I never want to settle for good enough. Instead I always want to seek to make a positive change.

26. Observant

I want to take all of life in.

27. Peart

I want to be honestly in good spirits at all times.

28. Romantic

Sure, I want to be a little old school in this sense.

29. Elysian

I want to give you the same feeling that you get in paradise.

30. Curious

And I never want to stop searching for answers.
Cover Image Credit: Favim

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Coping With The Loss Of A Passion

It's hard to get it back once you lose it.

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In college, time to focus on passions seems limited. The homework, essays, group projects, and exams are never-ending.

In high school, I took my free time for granted. I was dancing four hours four nights a week, but I wasn't constantly stressed. I had time to focus on my passion, which is dance.

In college, I am a part of an amazing dance club. But I don't get to compete, take technique classes, or be with the team I was with since I was 8 years old. Now, I receive videos of my team from home's amazing performances, and it aches a bit. I am so proud and happy for their growth but jealous that they have more years than I do. It is nearly impossible to find technique classes at college to take with no car, little free time, and barely any money. I miss my team, I miss my dance teachers and choreographers, and I miss competitions, but most of all, I miss the person I was when I had the opportunity to pursue my passion several hours a week.

My passion will always be there, and I do get to pursue dance on a smaller scale with some amazing dancers in college, but I am coping with the fact that I will never do another competition with my team again, I will never be able to dance with them again, and I will never be able to learn from my dance teachers again. It's a hard loss, one that I think about every day.

To anyone who still has the opportunities to pursue their passions to the fullest extent, you are lucky. Not everyone gets the chance to keep up with their sport, passion, or activity that they dedicated all of their time to in high school. Don't take a single second of it for granted, and remember why you are doing what you are doing. Take time to reflect on why you love it so much, how it makes you feel, and how you can express yourself during it. Whatever this passion or activity is, make every second count.

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