Why Millennials Understand The Future Of Work Better

Why Millennials Understand The Future Of Work Better

The future of work isn’t sitting in individual cubicles slaving away from nine to five.
285
views

The future of work isn’t sitting in individual cubicles slaving away from nine to five. It’s going to be in co-working spaces and remotely. Already, 38 percent of Millennials do freelance work—a number that’s more than likely going to increase. Lack of flexibility in their schedules was a one of the top reasons why Millennials leave their jobs. Freelancing is perfect for this generation.

Co-working spaces give us the flexibility that we crave, while also providing the feeling of belonging to a community and connecting with other workers. You have the incentive of other people working to get you to work, while at home you might have troubles making yourself do things. They offer the perfect balance.

I’m working remotely in a co-working space from Seoul, myself. Hive Arena boasts that it’s the coolest co-working space in Seoul—and they’re probably right. It’s welcoming, friendly and has everything you could ever want from an ideal co-working space. The physical location even provides free beer. It doesn’t really get better than that.

Wanting Flexibility Doesn’t Mean We Don’t Want To Work

In fact, it’s basically the opposite. Millennials really blend their work and personal lives together. We want a job that’s fulfilling because we blend so much. We’re willing to work weird hours as long as we get what we want out of a job. If a Millennial has flexibility and a work environment that works for them, you’ll get the best work out of us.

Millennials tend to pick up extra jobs on the side, too. The share economy is a big deal, and services like Uber and Lyft let us pick up a bit of extra cash whenever we have some free time. We’re adept to multitasking due to the amount of technology we’ve always had at our fingertips, so juggling multiple jobs isn’t a problem.

Instead of formal internships, a lot of Millenials use freelance work to hone their skills and develop new ones, all while getting paid. A lot of internships out there don’t provide payment, so this gives us an opportunity to work in the real world gaining experience without taking a hit in pay. Plus, a college student can often continue doing freelance work during the semester. They’re gaining work experience while getting their education, giving them a chance to get ahead.

We’re Used To Co-living Already

Co-working is where we’re most comfortable. Probably because we’re already co-living. Our generation is less concerned with owning material possessions like houses, and more about the experiences. Co-living gives us experiences with other people, like potluck dinners and other activities with the other people in the shared living space. Being around a community of people with a similar mindset allows everyone to nurture and support each other. It’s good for the mind.

Co-working just extends this practice to the workforce. The people in the workspace are great to bounce ideas off of and to get different perspectives on what you’re working on. You can have people in the same workspace that are all working in different disciplines and for different companies. You can get unique input from them that you wouldn’t be able to get if you were home alone or sitting in a cubicle.

Co-working spaces can also be in a variety of places. Sometimes you just need a change of scenery to shake things up and get some new ideas flowing. They can provide new inspiration. The various people that you’ll meet at each space help too. You’re always going to be with someone different and it only takes one different person to be able to spark the idea you were looking for.

This also works for a co-workspace that specific to one company. When you have everyone from different departments mingling together, you can come up with ideas that never would’ve been thought of otherwise. If everyone is separated in certain departments and at their desks, it’s discouraging the communication and idea flow that could be happening.

Millennials are used to being in constant communication with people at all times of the day. With smartphones and the millions of apps, we’re talking to people all over the world all the time. Being able to communicate freely in the workplace comes naturally to us. We’re already prepared for the future of working with other people in a collaborative environment.

The future of work is in an environment where Millenials thrive. They’re prepared for—and are and are one of the main reasons why—the landscape of the workplace is changing. The days of cramped offices and standard shifts will soon be a thing of the past. This gives Millenials a chance to show the world what they’re capable of and to take the professional world by storm.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

Popular Right Now

I'm A Woman And You Can't Convince Me Breastfeeding In Public Is OK In 2019

Sorry, not sorry.

49543
views

Lately, I have seen so many people going off on social media about how people shouldn't be upset with mothers breastfeeding in public. You know what? I disagree.

There's a huge difference between being modest while breastfeeding and just being straight up careless, trashy and disrespectful to those around you. Why don't you try popping out a boob without a baby attached to it and see how long it takes for you to get arrested for public indecency? Strange how that works, right?

So many people talking about it bring up the point of how we shouldn't "sexualize" breastfeeding and seeing a woman's breasts while doing so. Actually, all of these people are missing the point. It's not sexual, it's just purely immodest and disrespectful.

If you see a girl in a shirt cut too low, you call her a slut. If you see a celebrity post a nude photo, you call them immodest and a terrible role model. What makes you think that pulling out a breast in the middle of public is different, regardless of what you're doing with it?

If I'm eating in a restaurant, I would be disgusted if the person at the table next to me had their bare feet out while they were eating. It's just not appropriate. Neither is pulling out your breast for the entire general public to see.

Nobody asked you to put a blanket over your kid's head to feed them. Nobody asked you to go feed them in a dirty bathroom. But you don't need to basically be topless to feed your kid. Growing up, I watched my mom feed my younger siblings in public. She never shied away from it, but the way she did it was always tasteful and never drew attention. She would cover herself up while doing it. She would make sure that nothing inappropriate could be seen. She was lowkey about it.

Mindblowing, right? Wait, you can actually breastfeed in public and not have to show everyone what you're doing? What a revolutionary idea!

There is nothing wrong with feeding your baby. It's something you need to do, it's a part of life. But there is definitely something wrong with thinking it's fine to expose yourself to the entire world while doing it. Nobody wants to see it. Nobody cares if you're feeding your kid. Nobody cares if you're trying to make some sort of weird "feminist" statement by showing them your boobs.

Cover up. Be modest. Be mindful. Be respectful. Don't want to see my boobs? Good, I don't want to see yours either. Hard to believe, I know.

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

The First Black Student at USF: Ernest Boger

The black history of our university paves the path for future students of color

27
views

February is Black History month, which spurred me to research into some of the Black History of my own university. There has been many inspirational students of color at the University of South Florida, and all began with one great man. In 1961, University of South Florida accepted their first black student to the university, Ernest Boger. Like many, Boger worked hard for his eventual acceptance to USF. He graduated valedictorian of his high school class and obtained an almost perfect score on his college entrance exam.

While at USF, Ernest Boger continued to be a great academic, as well as highly involved throughout USF activities, especially in the band. One thing that made me very proud to be a USF student is Boger's comments on his transition to USF. Though he did say it was difficult feeling like an outsider in comparison to everyone else, he felt accepted by many at college. However, the same could not be said about the community. For instance, Boger reflects on a time where his band mates and him went to a local restaurant, but the manager refused to serve Boger. As a reflection of true Bull culture, Boger's band mates along with other USF student protested the restaurant for days, until they were attacked as a result. I am so proud to be at a university that supports people of color, and immediately supported the only African American student at the university when he was confronted with outright discrimination.

Despite the discrimination and racism he faced, Boger continued his education at USF, graduating with a bachelor's degree in psychology. And then went on to get a doctorate! Reading about Ernest Boger makes me proud to continue his legacy as a African American student at USF. Especially in the presence of a racially charged society that still presents many limitations for African Americans in the work force, despite the education they worked hard to acquire.

Ernest Boger did not let discrimination halt his success, and neither will we.

Related Content

Facebook Comments