A Millennial's Appeal to Tomi Lahren

A Millennial's Appeal to Tomi Lahren

The host of "On Point with Tomi Lahren" on the One America News Network is only 22 years old, and she is already catching the attention of the Millennial generation.
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Ms. Lahren, this is an appeal not from a critic but from a fan. Your "Final Thoughts" on the Chattanooga shooting appeared a dozen times on my news feed last Saturday. It was the first I heard of you or your show. I chose to look into the person beyond the face seen in that video clip. The inquiry involved watching many of your videos online and reading a number of articles to learn more on who you are as a person. I became a fan in the process.

Your speech from March at the Conservative Political Action Conference informed me you would "gladly be the cold bucket of water that wakes [the Millennials] up." A May 17th article written by Emma Roller for the National Journal explained your wish to extend your audience past the hard-right conservatives to reach the independents and Millennials, which cites, "When I bring people on my show, I'm not going to bring hard right-wingers on that just reinforce what I have to say, and I'm not going to bring on liberals so that I can talk over them, or interrupt them because that doesn't educate anyone or inform anyone." Christy Hammond's piece for the Rapid City Journal in September of 2014 illuminated the vision behind your show: "I want all sides to be represented on an even playing field. The viewers can then decide where they align." You said you believe that "young people don't feel they can relate to the conservatives they see on FOX News," and that "[young people] need a new face that can speak to them, not at them."

Principles set people apart, but they are fragile, and sometimes have a shelf life. In a viral media age, anyone's rant can soon become what defines them. It draws momentary attention to delivery, which can compromise content. The consistency of message is paramount. The message in the Chattanooga shooting video is a vehement personal and emotional reaction. Too many Millennials may see your emotional vigor and regard it as entertainment. They may ignore or never choose to examine the principles you stand for, and begin to tune in merely to be there the next time you go off. Then you will have lost control of your content. When you go off, you are no longer educating or informing anyone. Your tirade is viral, not your pledge to be different.

You can still redeem your principles. They are not lost. People need to feel like they can get the truth. We turn to those we trust for the truth. Due to the sheer volume of available media and our reliance upon it, the Millennials may need those sources to turn to more than any prior generation. The Millennials' hope is that there is still good.

The final thought on your impassioned and personal comments on the Chattanooga shooting is a position best represented by the words of a former President:

"Little progress can be made by merely attempting to repress what is evil. Our great hope lies in developing what is good."

-Calvin Coolidge, 30th President of the United States

Cover Image Credit: billoreilly

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5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
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Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

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A Florida House Committee Is Undermining Your Vote On Amendment 4

Before felons can regain their right to vote, they must pay court fines, fees, and take care of any other "financial obligations." Essentially, this is a poll tax.

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Amendment 4, also known as the Voting Rights Restoration for Felons Initiative, was added to the Constitution of Florida after being passed this last midterm election on November 6, 2018.

Amendment 4 restored the voting rights of Floridians with prior felony convictions after all terms of their sentence have been met, including parole and probation. This amendment only applies to felons who have not been convicted of murder or sexual offenses.

On January 8, 2019, an estimated 1.4 million ex-felons regained their right to vote. This is monumental. Prior to this amendment, Florida was one of four states that used felony disenfranchisement. Amendment 4 gives voice, and rightfully so, to felons who have served their time. Amendment 4 is also putting to rest, finally, years and years of disenfranchisement and suppression.

Now, only two months after its passage, the House Criminal Justice Committee is trying to water down this piece of legislation. This is a direct violation of the will of the 64% of Floridians who voted for the legislation as is. This amendment was not to be "clarified," as Governor DeSantis put it, but rather to be self-implementing.

However, the House Criminal Justice Committee proposed a bill that would tack on some extra qualifiers in order for felons to be enfranchised. The bill will require court fines, fees, and other "financial obligations" (in addition to fees administered in a judge's sentence) to be paid in full before a felon's voting rights are restored. This seems awfully similar to a poll tax to me. Obviously, this is going to affect people without a lot of resources rather than white-collar criminals who can afford a $500,000 bond.

This new qualifier will prevent felons from voting based on the money that can be coughed up as if they don't have to worry about their finances long after they leave prison.

Some may argue that these felons shouldn't have committed a crime in the first place. However, I would argue that holding a felon's vote hostage on the basis of money is unconstitutional.

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