24 Clubs You Didn't Know Existed At LSU

24 Clubs You Didn't Know Existed At LSU

If you've got some free time on your hands, consider joining one of these interesting organizations on LSU's campus!

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In addition to LSU's sports teams, Greek organizations and major-oriented meeting groups, there are 500-plus other clubs and groups at our school that you can join. Here are just a few gems that are available to you... some you may know, and some you might've never even knew existed. If you're interested in learning more about the mentioned club, just click the corresponding link.

Animal Care For A Cause

This club was established with the purpose of bringing students together to stop the mistreatment and abandonment of animals. They hold annual fundraisers to raise money that's donated to local human societies and rescue organizations.

Mock Trial

The American Mock Trial Association sponsors this club, which is centered on law, public speaking and the art of theatricality. "If you are a student who is considering a future in the legal field, or if you enjoy acting and public speaking," then this club is perfect for you.

Bad Movie Club

The Bad Movie club may be one of the most ~interesting~ clubs at LSU, and it celebrates "the unintentional humor of poorly made cinematic films, as well as providing students an opportunity to participate in discussions about cinema and what makes a movie good or bad."

Cajun Club at LSU

Definitely the most Louisiana-esque club at Louisiana State University, this club will teach you all about the Cajun lifestyle, traditions, culture, language, food, music, and history.

Elevate at LSU

Elevate's mission statement: "The purpose of Elevate is to inspire young women at LSU to find a lifestyle that enables them to be the happiest and healthiest versions of themselves."

Fashion Association at LSU

This club (formerly known as "Hemline") is perfect for anyone interested in fashion, and they participate in a variety of fashion-related events in the Baton Rouge and New Orleans area.

Feminists in Action

This group works to "promote feminist awareness and activism" in our college community and is open to all students interested in getting involved.

LSU Ambassadors

The LSU Ambassadors serve as the ultimate student leaders on campus; they provide tours, lead orientation sessions, and act as all-around information-givers to students and parents alike.

Improv Club

This self-coached group is perfect for anyone looking to learn more about improv acting and get involved in real performances.

Karate Club

The Karate Club at LSU welcomes anyone who's interested in learning to train in karate, and no previous experience is required.

Quiz Bowl

LSU Quiz Bowl teams compete to answer a variety of trivia questions, getting together for regular meetings as well as at trivia nights at local Baton Rouge restaurants.

Service Breaks

LSU Service Breaks is a team-oriented volunteer group that participates in community service outside the Baton Rouge area.

The Bad Idea Society

According to their info page, the purpose of this organization is "to find possibly productive or interesting aspects of seemingly "bad" ideas." At the meetings, members will respond to prompts anonymously and engage in open discussion.

Tabletop Games Club

This club meets in West Laville Hall and features all kinds of strategic games, from board games to "Mafia" games.

Imprint Communications

Imprint is actually a student-run public relations firm and is perfect for anyone in the mass communication field looking for real-world experience. It's like a PR internship without ever leaving campus!!!

Planned Parenthood Generation Action

Planned Parenthood Generation Action is a student-led advocacy group that hosts educational events about all things sexual health, even collaborating with other organizations on LSU's campus.

Quidditch Club at LSU

Yes, you read correctly. This Harry Potter-inspired game is a mix between "rugby, basketball, dodgeball, and wrestling" and welcomes people of any athletic background. The Quidditch team even travels to compete against schools like Texas A&M, Baylor, and Arkansas.

Tigers Against Trafficking

Tigers Against Trafficking has three main objectives awareness, activation, and fundraising. This club works to raise awareness about the human trafficking issues in our Baton Rouge area and beyond.

Jump Rope Club

This club gets people together to practice jump-roping skills and promote all aspects of physical fitness. Members attend weekly meetings, participate in competitions and do volunteer work.

Running Club

The Running Club at LSU focuses on both the physical and social aspects of running and welcomes people of all fitness levels.

Spoon LSU

If you're a foodie, this organization is for you!!! Spoon LSU "is a food publication created for students, by students that is dedicated to creating unique food experiences on campus."

Kryptonite Flash Mob

"Kryptonite is the PREMIER hip hop flash mob crew here at LSU." The group has performed for events all around the community, like Homecoming Pep Rally, Fall Fest, Dance Marathon, wedding proposals and many more.

Outdoors Club

The Outdoors Club at LSU is all about fostering the interest of all things nature and fun; this group explores activities like hiking, canoeing, and camping, and plans for trips including these throughout the semester.

Score a Friend Club

The Score a Friend Club at LSU is actually a "non-profit organization, developed by Sarah, a 15-year-old girl in pursuit of her Girl Scout Gold Award." This group is all about fostering friendships and opportunities for kids with/without disabilities all around the community, through sports and fun activities.

These are just ~some~ of the amazing on-campus organizations here at Louisiana State University, so reach out and get involved!!!

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So, You Want To Be A Nurse?

You're going to find that nursing isn't really about the medicine or the assessments. Being a nurse is so much more than anything that you can learn in school. Textbooks can't teach you compassion and no amount of lecture time will teach you what it truly means to be a nurse.

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To the college freshman who just decided on nursing,

I know why you want to be a nurse.

Nurses are important. Nursing seems fun and exciting, and you don't think you'll ever be bored. The media glorifies navy blue scrubs and stethoscopes draped around your neck, and you can't go anywhere without hearing about the guaranteed job placement. You passed AP biology and can name every single bone in the human body. Blood, urine, feces, salvia -- you can handle all of it with a straight face. So, you think that's what being a nurse is all about, right? Wrong.

You can search but you won't find the true meaning of becoming a nurse until you are in the depths of nursing school and the only thing getting you through is knowing that in a few months, you'll be able to sign the letters "BSN" after your name...

You can know every nursing intervention, but you won't find the true meaning of nursing until you sit beside an elderly patient and know that nothing in this world can save her, and all there's left for you to do is hold her hand and keep her comfortable until she dies.

You'll hear that one of our biggest jobs is being an advocate for our patients, but you won't understand until one day, in the middle of your routine physical assessment, you find the hidden, multi-colored bruises on the 3-year-old that won't even look you in the eyes. Your heart will drop to your feet and you'll swear that you will not sleep until you know that he is safe.

You'll learn that we love people when they're vulnerable, but you won't learn that until you have to give a bed bath to the middle-aged man who just had a stroke and can't bathe himself. You'll try to hide how awkward you feel because you're young enough to be his child, but as you try to make him feel as comfortable as possible, you'll learn more about dignity at that moment than some people learn in an entire lifetime.

Every class will teach you about empathy, but you won't truly feel empathy until you have to care for your first prisoner in the hospital. The guards surrounding his room will scare the life out of you, and you'll spend your day knowing that he could've raped, murdered, or hurt people. But, you'll walk into that room, put your fears aside, and remind yourself that he is a human being still, and it's your job to care, regardless of what he did.

Each nurse you meet will beam with pride when they tell you that we've won "Most Trusted Profession" for seventeen years in a row, but you won't feel that trustworthy. In fact, you're going to feel like you know nothing sometimes. But when you have to hold the sobbing, single mother who just received a positive breast cancer diagnosis, you'll feel it. Amid her sobs of wondering what she will do with her kids and how she's ever going to pay for treatment, she will look at you like you have all of the answers that she needs, and you'll learn why we've won that award so many times.

You'll read on Facebook about the nurses who forget to eat and pee during their 12-hour shifts and swear that you won't forget about those things. But one day you'll leave the hospital after an entire shift of trying to get your dying patient to eat anything and you'll realize that you haven't had food since 6:30 A.M. and you, too, will be one of those nurses who put everything else above themselves.

Too often we think of nursing as the medicine and the procedures and the IV pumps. We think of the shots and the bedpans and the baths. We think all the lab values and the blood levels that we have to memorize. We think it's all about the organs and the diseases. We think of the hospitals and the weekends and the holidays that we have to miss.

But, you're going to find that nursing isn't really about the medicine or the assessments. Being a nurse is so much more than anything that you can learn in school. Textbooks can't teach you compassion, and no amount of lecture time will teach you what it truly means to be a nurse.

So, you think you want to be a nurse?

Go for it. Study. Cry. Learn everything. Stay up late. Miss out on things. Give it absolutely everything that you have.

Because I promise you that the decision to dedicate your life to saving others is worth every sleepless night, failed test, or bad day that you're going to encounter during these next four years. Just keep holding on.

Sincerely,

The nursing student with just one year left.

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Everything A Future Sun Devil Needs To Know About Arizona BEFORE Coming To ASU

Tempe, Arizona is its own monster, so come prepared.

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Coming to Arizona State was a crazy decision on my part. I'm from Delaware, and besides visiting campus for one day in April of 2018, this was technically my first time living on the West Coast over 2,000 miles away. I don't regret it at all, but what I do regret is not properly informing myself about the area. There are things that happen in Arizona that do not occur back home, and if I had braced myself for monsoon season or the abominable heat at night, maybe August would have gone a bit smoother.

This is what I knew about Tempe: It's hot for most of the year and it's in the valley. Wow. There are so many elements that are missed if you are from out of state and have only seen Tempe on a tour day, like me. This may seem like common sense, but there is so much to learn about each place around the world, and you can get blindsided if you don't do your research.

Did you know that it rains in the hot, dry, desert valley that is Phoenix? I sure did not. It didn't make sense or occur to me than anything, but hot, sunny weather would ever happen, but to be fair, most of the year is hot and sunny. The official dates of monsoon season are June 15 to September 20, but the peak time for this disastrous weather is mid-July to mid-August. Monsoons aren't all just rain and high winds. A few times last semester in August when I walked outside, the sky was dark, the air was visibly dusty and humid, and there was a huge wall of dust in the distance. Rain will pour down from the sky out of nowhere and bring a dust storm, thunder, and more along with it. So be safe, always check the weather, and buy a raincoat and umbrella.

Along with the crazy weather last year, I began to get very sick. In college, everyone is sick all the time, so I figured it was just something I caught from sharing a drink or being in close quarters with thousands of other people each day. I went to the ASU Health Services many times in those first couple months and no doctor could figure out the deep-rooted cause of my continuous enlarged tonsils. Finally, I was prescribed an inhaler, steroids to calm the inflammation, and a recommendation to buy myself some Claritin and a nose spray. I was a new person after a couple of days. I also noticed the importance of changing my air filter every couple of months. It turns out what I thought was mono was allergies. I had never had allergies back home and didn't give it a second thought. I took the medicine each day and felt amazing. One time I skipped the Claritin for two weeks, and like clockwork, my tonsils swelled up again, so now I take it each day to stay alive. Tempe does not have terrific air quality, so be cautious even if you don't typically have allergies, or you'll end up like me — sick, missing out on living life, and not having fun on the weekends.

Since I'm from the beach when it is hot outside people wear bikinis, shorts, and typical summer gear. When I got here, I noticed there was a different summer dress code. Besides college kids wearing shorts and minimal clothing, the adults I observed walking down the road were all wearing pants and long-sleeve shirts. I was baffled. However, I now understand it protects their skin from the harsh UV rays, even if it is 110 degrees outside. The UV rays emitted in Arizona from the sun are very intense. I didn't get rid of my chest sunburn until October when it got slightly cooler outside. I will never wear pants and long-sleeves in such intense heat, but, applying sunscreen every couple of hours isn't a bad idea.

This may make your skin crawl, but if you take any of this information to heart, remember this: The cockroach population is out of control here. Since they can survive in basically any temperature and will outlive humanity, their presence is horrifying. One night I woke up to find a huge roach on my windowsill (which spans my entire bed, mind you). Then, I lost it. To this day, I have never found it and it's probably alive with a whole new clan out there just waiting to get back into my bedroom and attack. I remember those first couple nights at ASU walking around campus for all the free events and seeing them everywhere. That's not an exaggeration. In Delaware, I hadn't seen one for years. Now it's like they were making up for all that lost time.

Basically, during my first month here, I was adapting to the new city, climate, huge lectures, and pure independence. Even though I wasn't aware of monsoon season, my newfound allergies, the intense UV rays, weird ways in which people protect their skin, and the frightening cockroach clans, I finished nine months here mostly unscathed. If I could have read some candid, first-hand information, I would have. Would I have bought an umbrella? No. But if you're reading this, you are getting the information you need to justify that pre-college purchase. Good luck, future Sun Devil, and don't forget the bug spray!

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