LeBron James Is The Best NBA Player Of All Time And It Is Time To Accept It

LeBron James Is The Best NBA Player Of All Time And It Is Time To Accept It

It is time to recognize the King as truly the G.O.A.T.
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After becoming the youngest player in NBA history to reach 29,000 career points on November 3rd against the Washington Wizards, numerous sport analysts and NBA fanatics began to question the legitimacy of his legacy. 29,000 points is not too shabby for the 6' 8", 270 pound freight train that is LeBron James, but this statistic is only a fraction of his already historic career.

With three NBA championships and most valuable player in all three of those finals appearances, four regular season MVP awards, a thirteen-time All Star, and countless more accolades, James has solidified himself on the Mount Rushmore of basketball, commonly understood and accepted by any reasonable analyst. But why stop there? In his 15th season in the league, it is time to give credit where credit is due and accept that LeBron James is the best player that the game of basketball has ever witnessed.

I hear the counterarguments already. But Michael Jordan went to six finals and won all six while never having to go to a game seven. Can LeBron say the same?! Yes, these are facts and remain intact for Michael Jordan's legacy. Undefeated in six NBA finals is a statistic that LeBron can never achieve. He has been defeated twice by the Golden State Warriors -- once under the MVP Stephen Curry and another after the league crippling move by Kevin Durant.

He also lost in 2014 to a well coached, polished Spurs team and in 2011 to the Dallas Mavericks (my team of preference so I can only be so upset) which many believed ended all talk of LeBron being considered the GOAT. He also lost in 2007 to the Spurs as well but, c'mon, we can all agree that had LeBron not been the best player of all time, that team wouldn't have even imagined playing a single playoff game.

But do rings help solidify the argument of Greatest of All Time? Wouldn't the title, in this case, have to be handed over to Bill Russell, the man who would have to use one of his toes in order to wear all of his rings?

Do we take into account the level of competition during the different eras? Yes, the Mavericks series would easily be an exception to this argument, but did Michael Jordan ever have to face any team with the firepower that is the Golden State Warriors?

Importantly, did Michael Jordan take numerous teams to the NBA finals while doing it seven (and most likely to be eight) years in a row? No.

This is the point where I would like to bring up numbers and statistics as well. After 15 seasons in the league (Michael only played 15 seasons) these are the number: Jordan averaged 30.1 ppg while James has so far averaged 27.2, James has averaged 7.3 rebounds and 7.1 assists where Michael only averaged 6.2 and 5.3, while Jordan has a slight advantage in steals per game and twenty more 50 point games, LeBron James doubles Michael Jordan in triple doubles with 56 and also has a higher regular season win percentage.

To continue with the statistics, LeBron currently has a higher field goal and three-point percentage as well as a higher box score plus minus (score while in versus out of the game).

And he's not even done.

LeBron James has remained in his prime for thirteen years while never sustaining any severe injuries also making him one of the most durable players of all time. Over the next four or five years to come, it is commonly believed by most that LBJ will have scored the most points in NBA history and dish out enough assists to make him at least in the top five all-time in that category as well.

When discussing legacy, longevity matters and LeBron has managed to remain in the peak of his career longer and stronger than any player in the history of the sport. In his fifteenth season and in the same game that LeBron reached 29,000 career points, LBJ put up 57 points with 11 rebounds and 7 assists. In his fifteenth season.

No player has averaged more than twenty-five points in more than eleven seasons in a row, and LeBron James has done it thirteen times. He can guard all five positions and can even play all five positions (demonstrated by his position at point guard on October 25th).

The question at hand is this: if the existence of the universe relied on one game 1v1 against some extraterrestrial entity with all of humanity on the line, who would be the obvious choice.

LeBron James.

Cover Image Credit: Wikimedia

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To The Coach Who Took Away My Confidence

You had me playing in fear.
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"The road to athletic greatness is not marked by perfection, but the ability to constantly overcome adversity and failure."

As a coach, you have a wide variety of players. You have your slow players, your fast players. You have the ones that are good at defense. You have the ones that are good at offense. You have the ones who would choose to drive and dish and you have the ones that would rather shoot the three. You have the people who set up the plays and you have the people who finish them. You are in charge of getting these types of players to work together and get the job done.

Sure, a coach can put together a pretty set of plays. A coach can scream their head off in a game and try and get their players motivated. A coach can make you run for punishment, or they can make you run to get more in shape. The most important role of a coach, however, is to make the players on their team better. To hopefully help them to reach their fullest potential. Players do make mistakes, but it is from those mistakes that you learn and grow.

To the coach the destroyed my confidence,

You wanted to win, and there was nothing wrong with that. I saw it in your eyes if I made a mistake, you were not too happy, which is normal for a coach. Turnovers happen. Players miss shots. Sometimes the girl you are defending gets past you. Sometimes your serve is not in bounds. Sometimes someone beats you in a race. Sometimes things happen. Players make mistakes. It is when you have players scared to move that more mistakes happen.

I came on to your team very confident in the way that I played the game. Confident, but not cocky. I knew my role on the team and I knew that there were things that I could improve on, but overall, I was an asset that could've been made into an extremely great player.

You paid attention to the weaknesses that I had as a player, and you let me know about them every time I stepped onto the court. You wanted to turn me into a player I was not. I am fast, so let me fly. You didn't want that. You wanted me to be slow. I knew my role wasn't to drain threes. My role on the team was to get steals. My role was to draw the defense and pass. You got mad when I drove instead of shot. You wanted me to walk instead of run. You wanted me to become a player that I simply wasn't. You took away my strengths and got mad at me when I wasn't always successful with my weaknesses.

You did a lot more than just take away my strengths and force me to focus on my weaknesses. You took away my love for the game. You took away the freedom of just playing and being confident. I went from being a player that would take risks. I went from being a player that was not afraid to fail. Suddenly, I turned into a player that questioned every single move that I made. I questioned everything that I did. Every practice and game was a battle between my heart and my head. My heart would tell me to go to for it. My heart before every game would tell me to just not listen and be the player that I used to be. Something in my head stopped me every time. I started wondering, "What if I mess up?" and that's when my confidence completely disappeared.

Because of you, I was afraid to fail.

You took away my freedom of playing a game that I once loved. You took away the relaxation of going out and playing hard. Instead, I played in fear. You took away me looking forward to go to my games. I was now scared of messing up. I was sad because I knew that I was not playing to my fullest potential. I felt as if I was going backward and instead of trying to help me, you seemed to just drag me down. I'd walk up to shoot, thinking in my head, "What happens if I miss?" I would have an open lane and know that you'd yell at me if I took it, so I just wouldn't do it.

SEE ALSO: The Coach That Killed My Passion

The fight to get my confidence back was a tough one. It was something I wish I never would've had to do. Instead of becoming the best player that I could've been, I now had to fight to become the player that I used to be. You took away my freedom of playing a game that I loved. You took away my good memories in a basketball uniform, which is something I can never get back. You can be the greatest athlete in the world, but without confidence, you won't go very far.

Cover Image Credit: Christina Silies

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The NBA Lottery Is A Broken System And Should Be Removed

The NBA's method of determining the top picks in the draft is wildly unfair.

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As a Hawks fan, I feel that we got robbed again in the lottery. Despite having the 5th best shot at the 1st pick and odds of 10.5%, we still ended up with the 8th overall pick for this draft.

Somehow, the Pelicans of all teams got the 1st pick, with just a 6% chance of doing so. The Pelicans did not even play all that bad this year and for them to get the 1st pick could quickly change their outlook. And after Anthony Davis was rumored to have asked for a trade, this may have all of a sudden changed his mind.

But what about the rest of the teams that had much worse struggles? How do they dig themselves out of their rabbit hole? Are they just left to rot away and lengthen their rebuild?

In the NFL and MLB, the order of draft picks is based on a reverse record order. This simply means that the team with the worst record picks first, the next-worst team picks second, and so on, with the best team picking last. The main purpose of the lottery in the NBA was to prevent teams from tanking. But now, the lottery has almost gotten out of hand. Teams that should be getting better picks (like the Hawks) are getting worse picks than they should.

Sure, I may be a little salty, but I think I am justified in my anger.

There were a lot of other teams that in my opinion suffered. Even the Cavs and Suns got robbed. The Cavs and Suns were tied for the best odds in the lottery, and still ended up with the 5th and 6th pick, respectively. So when I mean that Hawks fans are not the only teams upset with the lottery, you better believe it. I'm sure a lot of desperate fans of teams that failed to make the playoffs strongly dislike the draft.

Sure, it may be a lot easier to tank in the NBA compared to other leagues simply because an NBA team is usually much smaller than and MLB or NFL team. But if a team wants to purposely lose games, a team should have the right to do so. It's their loss in revenue from the fans that do not want to go see a losing team. And losing may be against the spirit of a game, but it is only in consideration of the future.

And considering there have not been any wild issues with MLB or NFL drafts, I really think the NBA should just stick to using a team's record to determine a draft pick. There aren't many other ways to fairly distribute picks to teams that are suffering and need good talent to get back to their winning ways.

Just my two cents.

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