Kyle Palmieri: Fear The Beard

Kyle Palmieri: Fear The Beard

Palmieri leads the Devils with 20 points as line mate Nico Hischier is expected to return.

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As the hockey season exits the month of November, the New Jersey Devils changed up practice lines during their first road trip where they lost six out of seven games. Following their most recent 2-1 deficit against the Carolina Hurricanes, where they scored two goals within the first 30 seconds against Cory Schneider in the first period, fans may be forgetting which Devil made history at the beginning of the regular season.

Kyle Palmieri was the first player in the NHL to score the opening goal in four back-to-back games, making history and contributing to his team leader status. The 20-point forward has played a total of 19 games alongside top linemates Taylor Hall and Nico Hischier, who is currently out with a left wrist injury as Travis Zajac fulfills the top line.

What Else To Expect From Palmieri

Palmieri may have already entered the prime of his career but looking back to last season, he only played 62 games due to a knee injury after a hit from Avalanche's Erik Johnson. Throughout 62 games, Palms racked up 24 goals and 20 assists totaling 44 points.

He has continued to be a consistent producer and can easily become an elite NHL goal scorer. With that being said, Palmieri should be able to top 30 goals and reach over 60 points this season. His linemates are also a large contribution to his success especially with Hall's playmaking skills and Hischier's speed.

With a healthy Palmieri and an MVP linemate, his numbers should rapidly increase. Discussing high ranked players similar to TJ Oshie and Ryan Johansen, Palmieri is 30th in the NHL with 80 total goals in just his first three seasons with New Jersey. If he can continue putting up points, especially on the power play, 30 goals can be easily topped.

The 27-year old reached 30 goals in his first year with the Devils back in the 2015-2016 season. His power play goals and points have been gradually increasing aside from his absence of last year. With Palmieri's powerful one-timers, the Devils can expect elite performance from one of their top forwards.

Is Palmieri Underrated in the League?

The Devils' top line would not be completed without their current point leader. Yes, Hall is the recent Hart Trophy winner and Hischier was drafted first overall in 2017, but Palmieri's most dangerous advantage may just be that he is underrated.

What sets Palmieri apart from his linemates is not just the beard. He has been a huge organizational addition and during just his first season in New Jersey his goals per game average (.357) landed him a spot in between Artemi Panarin and Max Pacioretty. He is powerful, productive, and a leader. Any team in the league that does not see that should fear the beard.

His production on the ice may be missed by the Anaheim Ducks who traded him away just for two of New Jersey's draft picks. He is a prominent force who has stellar on-ice chemistry with his line. Due to his knee injury last season, the eyes remained on Hall. However, Palmieri can break into the elite level and has what it takes to be a top-15 scorer. The name is not considered underrated in the state of New Jersey, but a healthy Palms and a full beard may be a surprise to others.

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The Coach That Killed My Passion

An open letter to the coach that made me hate a sport I once loved.
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I fell in love with the game in second grade. I lived for every practice and every game. I lived for the countless hours in the gym or my driveway perfecting every shot, every pass and every move I could think of. Every night after dinner, I would go shoot and would not allow myself to go inside until I hit a hundred shots. I had a desire to play, to get better and to be the best basketball player I could possibly be.

I had many coaches between church leagues, rec leagues, personal coaches, basketball camps, middle school and high school. Most of the coaches I had the opportunity to play for had a passion for the game like I did. They inspired me to never stop working. They would tell me I had a natural ability. I took pride in knowing that I worked hard and I took pride in the compliments that I got from my coaches and other parents. I always looked forward to the drills and, believe it or not, I even looked forward to the running. These coaches had a desire to teach, and I had a desire to learn through every good and bad thing that happened during many seasons. Thank you to the coaches that coached and supported me through the years.

SEE ALSO: My Regrets From My Time As A College Softball Player

Along with the good coaches, are a few bad coaches. These are the coaches that focused on favorites instead of the good of the entire team. I had coaches that no matter how hard I worked, it would never be good enough for them. I had coaches that would take insults too far on the court and in the classroom.

I had coaches that killed my passion and love for the game of basketball.

When a passion dies, it is quite possibly the most heartbreaking thing ever. A desire you once had to play every second of the day is gone; it turns into dreading every practice and game. It turns into leaving every game with earphones in so other parents don't talk to you about it. It meant dreading school the next day due to everyone talking about the previous game. My passion was destroyed when a coach looked at me in the eyes and said, "You could go to any other school and start varsity, but you just can't play for me."

SEE ALSO: Should College Athletes Be Limited To One Sport?

Looking back now at the amount of tears shed after practices and games, I just want to say to this coach: Making me feel bad about myself doesn't make me want to play and work hard for you, whether in the classroom or on the court. Telling me that, "Hard work always pays off" and not keeping that word doesn't make me want to work hard either. I spent every minute of the day focusing on making sure you didn't see the pain that I felt, and all of my energy was put towards that fake smile when I said I was OK with how you treated me. There are not words for the feeling I got when parents of teammates asked why I didn't play more or why I got pulled after one mistake; I simply didn't have an answer. The way you made me feel about myself and my ability to play ball made me hate myself; not only did you make me doubt my ability to play, you turned my teammates against me to where they didn't trust my abilities. I would not wish the pain you caused me on my greatest enemy. I pray that one day, eventually, when all of your players quit coming back that you realize that it isn't all about winning records. It’s about the players. You can have winning records without a good coach if you have a good team, but you won’t have a team if you can't treat players with the respect they deserve.

SEE ALSO: To The Little Girl Picking Up A Basketball For The First Time


Cover Image Credit: Equality Charter School

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7 Things You May Not Know About College Dance Teams

Commonly mistaken for cheerleaders at sporting events, we live a life pretty much unknown to most others!

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Although most of the Student Body only sees us as the girls that dance at football and basketball games, there is so much more that we do. From all of the preparations for our game day routines, workouts, working on team uniformity, a lot goes into our few minutes on the court. And for us, that's just a side hobby. Many Dance Teams nationwide compete at a National competition once a year. Most teams' goals are the same: winning a national championship. But what it takes to accomplish that is so much more than anyone sees!

We workout... a lot.

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From timed mile tests to morning workouts, we NEVER stop working out. Running, lifting, core-strengthening are just some of the things we do on the side to make sure we are always at our peak physically. And it helps us look good, too.

We practice a lot, too!

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From learning and perfecting game day routines to learning and perfecting our national's routine, practices never stop. We typically practice 3-5 times a week!

Game-day appearance is no joke!

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From the fake eyelashes to the full face of makeup, our final look must be approved by a coach before ANY performance.

Uniformity is a NECESSITY!

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From matching uniforms, to the same brand and color of lipstick, to the same exact style of eyelashes, probably the most important part of any collegiate dance team is the uniformity!

Nationals is our Super Bowl

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Game days can be fun and exciting, too, but the attention is on the players, as it should be. At nationals, however, we are the ones directly representing our school and competing for the National Title! Nothing compares to the feeling!

Fundraising, fundraising, and MORE fundraising!

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Collegiate Dance Team Nationals isn't cheap! Most Dance Teams have to fund at least the majority of their national's expenses, which is A LOT of money! From working kids' clinics, selling clothing, having GoFundMe pages, having Bingo events, the list can go on for days!! So much work is put in outside of practice just to raise enough money to compete at a national competition.

The audition process is ... brutal.

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From learning a dance off of Youtube a few days prior to the audition and performing it in front of judges, to executing all of the necessary technical skills (no matter if its YOUR cup of tea or not), to personal interviews, to a conditioning evaluation, auditions for collegiate dance teams might be some of the toughest days of the year.

Overall, being on a college Dance Team can be very overwhelming, but being surrounded by girls with similar interests as you 24/7 who are like family to you, make it all worth it!

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