become entrepreneur

Why I Want To Start My Own Business

The calling to become an entrepreneur has never been stronger.

127
views

I've had a few jobs in my lifetime. I can't say I enjoyed any of them. My last job had long hours with 10-hour shifts on average. Something that I learned with my last job is that I don't work well with others. I feel as though I am more capable of working on my own without others to slow me down. I've always been this way, ever since I was a little kid in elementary school. I was known as a 'quiet kid' but I was also known for being much smarter than the rest of the class. I focused on getting my work done early so I could relax while the other kids talked to each other and then struggled to finish their work on time.

See, I've always thought of working with others as a hindrance to my productivity. They bring along their opinions, drawbacks, and doubts. I don't need that. I know exactly how I want something to be done and I don't need anyone else disagreeing with it or trying to tweak it to fit their ideas. You might call this narcissistic but I think of it this way: if you want something done right then do it yourself.

A wise man once told me if you're not working for yourself than your just working for other's dreams. Most people have a boss and that boss doesn't care about your goals. That boss only cares about his own goals. Odds are you won't feel the same urgency to complete your work because it's just a paycheck to you. I find this system to be quite dreary and uninspiring. Your time is the most valuable thing in life. You can always make money back but you can't turn back the clock. Why chip away your effort at something that doesn't serve you?

A few years ago I had a business idea. I felt very good about this idea, sharing it with everyone I came across hoping to gain more insight from those with business experience. I was preparing to go into the School of Entrepreneurship and signed up for a ton of business classes and all the entrepreneurship classes I could take before getting into the program itself. The program starts junior year of college so for the first two years I just had to take care of all the prerequisite classes. I was deadset on becoming an entrepreneurship student. I sent in my application and wrote an essay about my business idea and why I would be a good entrepreneur. I waited and waited until one day my inbox lit up with an email from the program coordinator. Anxious to see the good news I opened the email, only to discover I hadn't gotten in.

With that, my entrepreneurship itch faded away. Doubts and adversity had overcome hope and passion. I started to think that starting my own business was a pipedream, that there was no way I could make this great idea a reality and make millions of dollars before I turned 25. I gave up on business school and switched to something easier - creative writing. I had always been a good writer and I figured I'd give it a shot. I knew it would be easier than business calc and accounting. While the English department has allowed me to expand my creative talents it still feels empty. As I write this article I imagine making a living for myself that is independent of others - I want to become an entrepreneur. The path is yet to be discovered but the seed has been planted.

Popular Right Now

8 Things You Need To Know About Selling On Redbubble

Everyone buys their stickers from Redbubble, but have you ever wanted to be the one making them?
8660
views

As someone who loves to fool around in Photoshop and Illustrator, I saw Redbubble as a chance to flex my skills as a graphic designer. The massive popularity of them provided me with an opportunity to make a little money on the side doing something I not only enjoyed but could do when the mood struck me. It seemed like a win-win, but there were a few things I wish I knew before I started making stickers.

1. Don't expect to be rolling in dough.

It took a month and maybe 10 different designs before I sold any of my stickers. I joined in October of 2017, and I have sold about 20 stickers.

2. Redbubble stickers are expensive for a reason.

At this point, I have sold about 20 stickers which may seem like a lot, until you find out how much I make per sticker. The artist sets how much they make after Redbubble’s share, so artists can set it as low as 0% profit (which means the sticker sells for $2.29).

3. Buying 10 and getting 50% off is great when you're the one buying the stickers...

...but it sucks when you’re the one selling them. I make an average of 20% per sticker, so when you buy my $2.75 sticker for $1.38, I only make 23¢.

4. Make things you would buy.

If there’s something you want to buy, but it doesn’t exist, make it. Keep in mind as well that if you wouldn't buy it, odds are that not too many other people would.

5. Try to offer variations.

You might make a design in blue and love it, but consider offering it in different colors. Someone might love the design but hate the color.

6. Make your designs as versatile as possible.

Redbubble is primarily known for its stickers, but your designs can be put on anything from a poster to a wall clock. Take advantage of that because more expensive items mean you make more for the same design when they sell.

7. Keywords are KEY.

You want your designs to be as visible as possible, so take advantage of all the tools they give you. Try to tag your design with anything that might relate to it; you want it to pop up in as many tags as possible.

8. Do your research.

If you are interested in making something, search one of the keywords and see how many results there are for it. Sometimes there is a need, and you can fill it.

I have enjoyed my time on Redbubble nonetheless, and I recommend it to anyone who likes to design or draw. It’s certainly not a good way to get rich quick, but I enjoy it. Every time someone purchases one of my stickers, I feel this rush of pride in knowing someone liked something that I designed. That's a big reason why I continue to put designs on Redbubble.



Cover Image Credit: Meagan McDowell

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

You'll Find More Than Food At Your Local Farmers Market, You'll Make Some Of Your Best Memories, Too

It's not just for some overpriced tomatoes.

435
views

Back in my hometown, I had a reputation among friends of always going for the smaller brand. They teased (much to my happiness, actually) me about being "all natural," or always "organic." They knew that sometimes waking up at noon after a Friday night sleepover, I would probably have been gone for a couple hours already.

It was because Saturdays are when the farmers markets are held.

Living in Nashville, Tennessee, I have the perfect balance of urban and rural life, not to mention an amazing music scene. Off the top of my head, I could name five or six weekly markets all around where I live, yet my favorite remains to be the smaller Franklin Farmers Market.

Franklin itself might be the most beautiful little town in the south, not to mention the country. It's filled with history, incredible food, adorable boutiques, and surrounded by some of the most gorgeous pieces of farmland you'll ever stumble upon.

But at the heart of this little land of history, underneath the roof of a revived, rustic factory, little booths begin to pop up in the barely-risen sunlight. Farmers, artisans, and people with passions come from counties all over hours before dawn every week, just to share what they have sown: a woman with a beautiful little lavender farm, a smiling man who may have stumbled upon the best cheese recipe ever created, an Amish family with the best chocolate milk in the whole world and dozens of others.

I make a day out of it with whoever I can drag out of bed on a Saturday morning, that person usually being my mother. It only takes 20 minutes or so to walk past every booth, if you're going at a slow pace. But it takes my mom and me around an hour to go all the way around. Each vendor knows me by my face after going for as long as I have and I make a point to talk to each and every one of my favorite booths, and every new one I see popping up on the scene.

There have been a few special booths that have caught my attention recently. One of the biggest booths, a man who builds frames and creates beautiful artwork on display in a trailer, had two little tiny tables set up beside it. The man was going on with his business as usual and I stepped toward the little children tables and peered down at what they had on display.

I saw little tiny blankets and pillows sewn roughly into shapes and buckets of "organic slime" with all sorts of different scents. The little girl behind the table immediately had me sold as soon as she started talking. She had made "dolly blankets and pillows" that your dolls were sure to love. The little boy went off about his awesome cool sticky slime, and some even had little beads in it for texture!

They were so excited, and my mom and I could not stop smiling. The man, who I learned was their father, walked over and started talking to us. They had been so excited by what their dad did that they wanted to sell what they loved to make too so that they could make themselves happy while they made other people happy, "just like Dad!".

When the two were distracted, the man thanked us for listening so kindly to them, and to assure us that we shouldn't feel obligated to buy their products. My mother and I could not stop beaming and bought one set of dolly bedding and one bucket of slime. The children weren't as excited about receiving the money as they were that they saw us walking away with their little works of art and love, the labels on them scribbled in crayon.

There was another elderly couple there who had the most beautiful wooden carvings and stunning plants who I have talked to for a collective amount of hours the past year. They told me they woke up at 4 a.m. every Saturday to drive here from their town three counties over. They had the kindest souls I've ever met and have offered me a couple of internships. They told me that they couldn't afford to pay me in money, but could give me any of the plants I desired. They were both highly educated, and experts in multiple fields and any knowledge they could have taught me would have been priceless, and had I not been headed to college this year, I would have taken them up on their offer.

The honey couple. The Air-Force veteran and his wife, who sell their fantastic honey and bee pollen.

The mother of four who has children at my high school, who makes homemade salves, tea, and tinctures that have spared me from sickness and soreness too many times to count. Who beamed when I knew what Calendula flower was.

The goat cheese lady.

The fresh-pasta people.

The bone-broth man.

The woman who makes jewelry out of old guitar strings.

The man who makes soap.

The custom sign making man.

Every time I see these people and everyone else at the farmers market, there is nothing but joy on all of our faces.

My mother and I probably spend an outrageous amount of money for the gifts we buy there for what we could find at Publix or on Amazon, but we do not regret it one bit. Nine dollars for a huge loaf of bread that I could find for two at Costco? A lot of people would scoff at that. But why it is so much better is that I am not spending nine dollars for just a loaf of bread. That money is going back to the passion that brought that baker, that farmer or that stay-at-home mom to the market in the first place. That money is going to the rainy day fund of the older couple that is saving for the expensive plane tickets back to their hometown for their 50th high school reunion.

That money isn't paying for some CEO's fourth vacation home. It's paying for a daughter to go to dance lessons. It's paying for that little boy's boy scout trip. It's giving back to the community that I love to see every Saturday morning. It's giving more, for happiness above everything.

Go to your local farmers market, open your eyes and your hearts, and feel, not just see, what I mean.

Related Content

Facebook Comments