5 Classes That Should Be Offered In High School

5 classes that should be taught at every high school

We need more than just science, history, math and reading.

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When someone moves out and doesn't know how to do something the biggest excuse is "I should've learned this in high school." People will argue, "no that's the parents' job". While many children do have parents that teach them useful life skills, many do not. Let's face it, not everyone has parents in their home. We have to learn all kinds of other things from Shakespeare to the theory of evolution in high school, why can't we throw in some skills that EVERYONE should know

1. Home Economics

Learning how to sew, cook and clean are skills everyone should learn... not just useful for girls!

Being able to fix your clothes saves a lot of money. Knowing how to cook for yourself and not ordering takeout every day will allow you to have a much healthier (and cheaper) lifestyle. Learning basic hygiene and cleaning tips can also help you have a healthier lifestyle. Basic childcare should also be added to the curriculum.

2. Basic Accounting

Although we are highly computerized now, writing checks is still a good thing to know how to do. Whether you make six figures or six dollars, you need to know how to budget your money. As much as we want to avoid it, adulthood brings bills. You don't have to pay some big shot financial planner to show you how to budget. Often times its simpler than it seems, young adults have just never learned how to crunch numbers that way.

(Also, it is a plus if you can learn how to do your own taxes and not have to pay for that either).

3. Basic Shop

Again on saving money - if you can fix it yourself you'll save a whole lot of money. I'm not saying everyone needs to become a certified mechanic out of high school, but knowing how to use basic power tools is handy. A class could even go as far as teaching basic vehicle maintenance, carpentry, and welding.

4. Career Preparation

A career prep class could allow students to explore various careers and prepare themselves for the future. No matter what field you choose, there are universal skills you will need such as interviewing and knowing the professional etiquette.

5. Basic I.T.

With everything becoming so computerized now, knowing how to use basic computer applications is necessary. It doesn't have to be an in-depth coding class, but teaching Microsoft applications and enhancing typing efficiency would be beneficial for all students.

Cover Image Credit:

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The Coach That Killed My Passion

An open letter to the coach that made me hate a sport I once loved.
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I fell in love with the game in second grade.

I lived for every practice and every game. I lived for the countless hours in the gym or my driveway perfecting every shot, every pass, and every move I could think of. Every night after dinner, I would go shoot and would not allow myself to go inside until I hit a hundred shots. I had a desire to play, to get better and to be the best basketball player I could possibly be.

I had many coaches between church leagues, rec leagues, personal coaches, basketball camps, middle school, and high school. Most of the coaches I had the opportunity to play for had a passion for the game like I did. They inspired me to never stop working. They would tell me I had a natural ability. I took pride in knowing that I worked hard and I took pride in the compliments that I got from my coaches and other parents. I always looked forward to the drills and, believe it or not, I even looked forward to the running. These coaches had a desire to teach, and I had a desire to learn through every good and bad thing that happened during many seasons. Thank you to the coaches that coached and supported me through the years.

SEE ALSO: My Regrets From My Time As A College Softball Player

Along with the good coaches, are a few bad coaches. These are the coaches that focused on favorites instead of the good of the entire team. I had coaches that no matter how hard I worked, it would never be good enough for them. I had coaches that would take insults too far on the court and in the classroom.

I had coaches that killed my passion and love for the game of basketball.

When a passion dies, it is quite possibly the most heartbreaking thing ever. A desire you once had to play every second of the day is gone, it turns into dreading every practice and game. It turns into leaving every game with earphones in so other parents don't talk to you about it. It meant dreading school the next day due to everyone talking about the previous game. My passion was destroyed when a coach looked at me in the eyes and said, "You could go to any other school and start varsity, but you just can't play for me."

SEE ALSO: Should College Athletes Be Limited To One Sport?

Looking back now at the amount of tears shed after practices and games, I just want to say to this coach:

Making me feel bad about myself doesn't make me want to play and work hard for you, whether in the classroom or on the court. Telling me that, "Hard work always pays off," and not keeping that word doesn't make me want to work hard either. I spent every minute of the day focusing on making sure you didn't see the pain that I felt, and all of my energy was put towards that fake smile when I said I was OK with how you treated me. There are not words for the feeling I got when parents of teammates asked why I didn't play more or why I got pulled after one mistake, I simply didn't have an answer. The way you made me feel about myself and my ability to play ball made me hate myself, not only did you make me doubt my ability to play, but you also turned my teammates against me to where they didn't trust my abilities. I would not wish the pain you caused me on my greatest enemy. I pray that one day, eventually, when all of your players quit coming back that you realize that it isn't all about winning records. It's about the players.

You can have winning records without a good coach if you have a good team, but you won't have a team if you can't treat players with the respect they deserve.

SEE ALSO: To The Little Girl Picking Up A Basketball For The First Time


Cover Image Credit: Equality Charter School

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High School Graduates, Here Is How To Prepare For College Like A Boss

Know that you will never feel ready.

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The time has come! You have officially completed your normative education. Now you are onto the next step, college. As a graduating senior, you may be feeling one of two things: ready to get out of the house or ready to crawl into a hole and die because you feel unprepared.

Well for those who are wanting to crawl into a hole, this is for you.

First things first, one of the best pieces of college advice anyone can give you is - you are never going to feel prepared for the next step. It does not matter if you know what your major is going into college, once you get to your college graduation, you will be in the same boat. But know that it is okay to not be ready for the next step. And do not let this freak you out, let it comfort you because you're no different being a senior in high school than what a senior in college is feeling.

Not feeling ready, is the perfect amount of anxiety to drive you to do your research so that you can best prepare yourself for the next step. Hence, why you are reading this article.

So take a deep breath, know that you are human.

Secondly, the best way to prepare for college is to do exactly what you are doing, research. Reading advice columns written by yours truly, or heck check out other articles about preparing for college written by other creators of this site, or asking friends or family who are in or has been in college for advice is the best thing to do to prepare.

Everyone has their own unique college experiences, so by gathering as many perspectives on dorm room decor, roommates, classes, and so on will help you figure out the best ways to go about things like picking a roommate, knowing where to live, what to buy, and what to expect.

Thirdly, learn how to manage your time now. You may think you are the best at time management; however, college is a whole other ballpark when it comes to time. There are so many things, events, classes, assignments, friends that will want to take up your time. You're going to have to learn how to juggle a social life, sleep life, and academic life like you have never believed. The number one thing incoming freshmen struggle with is learning how to do this. Get ahead of the curve and begin to research and train yourself on how to best manage your time.

Lastly, take the time to ask your parents, guardian, friends mom, your neighbor - whoever, to show you how to do simple tasks that you may not know now. Such as: how to do laundry, how to fold laundry, how to grocery shop, how to cook simple meals, how to cook microwave mac n cheese (trust me, some people are clueless).

The hardest part about college is learning how to do things on your own because, guess what, mommy and daddy are not going to be there to do it for you anymore. Best to learn it now than to be that kid acting completely clueless in the laundry room and adding bleach to their dark colors. College is an exciting time to learn independence, but you have to have the skills to be independent.

Teach yourself these skills now, so that you can rock it your freshman year.

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