Are Phone Calls Becoming Obsolete?

Are Phone Calls Becoming Obsolete?

Will the many alternative forms of long-distance communication phase out phone calls for good?
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Personally, I own at least three devices that I can use to communicate with someone far away, as long as I have an internet connection: a smartphone, a tablet, and a laptop. When I was in elementary school in the mid-nineties, I only had two options to contact someone who was farther away than I could reach by foot: through snail mail or the house phone. I always had an irrational fear of calling people when I was younger, like when my mom asked me to call my friends across the street to ask when it was okay to come over. Eventually, my parents decided to bring AOL into our household, and they set up an email address for me. Now I was able to quickly communicate through writing, instead of with only my voice over the phone. Subsequent years brought AOL Instant Messaging (AIM), chat rooms, cell phones and, eventually, texting into our lives. It made it so much easier to simply message boys I liked and wait for their responses, as opposed to calling them on the phone. One time, some of my friends called a boy they liked and told him, which I thought was so brave of them!

Luckily, with AIM, we could chat as much as we liked with our friends, but text messaging plans usually only allowed about 200 text messages per month, per person. Several of my friends got in trouble with their parents for texting so much; they did not think it was necessary to pick up the phone and call anyone because text messages were so easy! My junior high years brought MySpace, and eventually, we had Facebook and Twitter in high school. The social media revolution had started. Slowly but surely, phone calls became reserved only for your close family members or for important events. I also started using a Blackberry to send emails to people even when a desktop or laptop computer was not available. Blackberry Messenger was a fun service that replaced AIM for me and many others because we could use it anywhere there was a data connection.

Because I went away to college across the country from California to Louisiana, Facebook became an important tool for sharing what was new with me with one simple status update, and the information when to every single one of my friends at once. Skype was one of the only video chat services that were reliable for catching up with friends and family face to face, and it was especially important for seeing my long-distance boyfriend every night before bed. College was also a place where I was able to meet and become close with people from around the world, so apps like WhatsApp and Viber became important to be able to communicate with them across geographical boundaries and foreign phone plans. With the normalization of the iPhone came the advent of FaceTime, which made it possible to have a video chat on the go over a data connection. Several apps followed suit, and now we have a plethora of options for video chat and for sharing information with hundreds, if not thousands, of followers and friends; Google Hangouts, Facebook Messenger, Instagram, Snapchat and many more apps of which I am probably not even aware are available for us to use at our fingertips on our phones, tablets, and computers.

If I receive a phone call from someone, it is usually for an important or grave reason. Sometimes I am concerned when I receive calls from people because I assume that something is so wrong or complicated that they could not have just texted me about it. Several companies do not even want to spend resources on having a person available with whom you can speak about concerns on the phone, so it is very typical to receive information by phone through an automated system, or, worse, they only have a recording telling you to visit their website in order to find the answer to your question. No one seems to want to bother with talking on the phone anymore.

For me, social media and texting are great for many reasons, but nothing can compare to catching up with an old friend on the telephone. Since I grew up in a time when that was the only way to communicate quickly across a long distance, I still feel it impolite to talk to someone about important information by text or by social media. I recently became engaged to my aforementioned long-distance boyfriend- we have been together for more than seven years, so several of our friends and family knew that our engagement was an inevitable exciting event to come. On the night of our engagement, I decided I wanted to let some of my closest friends and family know about it first by calling them before making it Facebook official. I had not talked with some of these friends and family by phone for months, if not years, before the engagement because I typically only contact them via texting or social media. I realized how important it is to keep in touch by phone with my closest friends, so I am working on calling more of my friends within the coming weeks to discuss not only my engagement but the new things in the lives of my friends and family.

Landlines seem to be few and far between these days (fun fact: you should always still have a house phone for emergency calls- just plug in any landline phone into a jack and if you dial 911 it will still go through! Lifeguard and first aid training FTW). Does anyone born in the new millennium even know where this icon comes from?

What do you think? For those of you who grew up without the internet or smartphones, is calling people still important? For those of you who grew up only using smartphones, is it necessary to call anyone anymore? Let me know in the comments below.

Cover Image Credit: Christopher Bowns

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25 Responses To Your Friend Who Doesn't Text Back

Omg thanks for responding so quickly...oh, wait.
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We all have that friend. That friend we love to death, but if we are sure of anything in this world, it’s that they will not respond to your text because they suck at texting. That moment when you see “Read 1:04 p.m.” and you’re like “and???? Helloooooooo!”

These are 25 responses for that dear friend.

1. Lol thanks for tagging me in that FB post, now text me tf back.


2. OMG, wait you met Chris Hemsworth and he’s professing his love to you??!! No? Okay, then you can def text me back.

3. Hey I’m coming to help you since you obviously broke your thumbs and can’t respond.

4. Lolol thanks for responding. I’ll just continue the conversation with myself. That’s cool.

5. Good chat.

6. Yeah I wouldn’t know how to respond either, pizza topping selection is a thought-provoking process. Take your time. Meditate on it.

7. The classic: ^^^^^^^^^


8. I hope you’re writing me the 8th Harry Potter novel.

9. That was a yes or no question. This isn’t difficult. You wouldn’t do well with ‘Sophie’s Choice.’

10. Omg, did you pass out from the excitement of getting a text from me? Totally understandable. Text me when you regain consciousness, love.

11. Omg what a witty and clever response. Nothing. So philosophical.

12. The only excuse I’ll accept is if you’re eating guac and don’t want to get it on your phone. Because avocados are life.

13. I love it when you do that adorable thing when you don’t text me back for hours. So cute.


14. Okay I’ll answer for you. Yes, you’re going out tonight. Glad we had this convo.

15. In the time it has taken you to respond, dinosaurs could have retaken the earth.

16. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHA

17. The dramatic but also very valid response: That’s what happens when you don’t respond for 30 minutes. People die.


18. I apologize for asking if you were coming to watch Bachelor, clearly the decision has caused you serious reflection on your priorities. I’m sorry to have caused you this existential crisis.

19. Sorry I annoyed you with my friendship. But like plz respond…

20. Your response time is longer than Ross and Rachel’s entire relationship. 10 seasons. You couldn’t text me back for 10 seasons?!!

21. Wait. You’re responding too fast. I can’t keep up. Hang on. Don’t respond so quickly. Jeez.

22. A subtle but perfectly placed gif. What will you go with? The classic eye roll perhaps or maybe a “you suck.”


23. Did you fall off a cliff? Wait, you don’t exercise. Pause your Netflix and respond b*tch.

24. Omg I WON THE LOTTERY. *responds* Lol now you respond…

25. And my personal favorite and go to, Did you text me and then decide to THROW YOUR PHONE ACROSS THE OCEAN?! Lol swim fast, I need an answer.

Cover Image Credit: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8289/7759302068_fac2dfd31d_b.jpg

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Modern Technology Is Fostering A Lazy Generation

I'm not a scientist or a researcher by any means, but I believe Millennials are becoming lazier and lazier by each and every new technological innovation made.

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In the world of technology, it seems as if there's a new app, product, or device being made or updated every single day. The motive behind all of these new innovations seems to be making life easier and more efficient. Millions of people live with a device, Amazon's Alexa, which allows us to call out to it and order it around, and it will gladly comply (even if you have to repeat your orders a few times

The purpose of products like Alexa is to reduce the time and effort we spend performing simple tasks, such as setting an alarm or playing a song on Spotify. This concept isn't a new one; Siri, which essentially revolves around the same purpose, has been around for years. Alexa, however, has been considered groundbreaking because it sits around your house or dorm room, blending in with the rest of your furniture, just waiting to be ordered around.

I guess it's safe to say that the inventors behind all of these developments have had good intentions; they have made life easier and more efficient after all. Something that used to take days to do, such as delivering a letter, can now be done simply in a matter of seconds; not only can information spread faster, but anyone can create an email account and use it to write to anyone across the world from the comfort of their home from practically any device. Technology really does seem like a lifesaver sometimes.


But what's the cost of this efficiency? It's without a doubt that a vast amount of effort and hours have been saved because of how simple the modern world has become. Yet, our dependence on recent innovations has made us less self-reliant, while being more reliant on inhuman machines and codes created by scientists and engineers.

Whenever I need to find an answer to something, my very first instinct is to pull out Safari on my iPhone and search for it on the internet. I've become so accustomed to searching for things on the web that I can type the word "Google" with my eyes closed in a matter of seconds (or maybe even milliseconds). Sometimes I will even ask questions to the people around me for them only to reply with, "I don't know, maybe Google it?"

My generation doesn't know what it's like to skim through a book or to seek out information from an expert because we're practically attached to devices that hold all the information we want to know in the click of a button. The only hard-copy dictionary in my house belongs to my parents; I have no need for such a dictionary because I have Google bookmarked on my computer and cell phone. I didn't even bring a dictionary to my dorm room for school this past year.

My fellow millennials and I lack the skills it takes to ponder deep within our minds to try and find the answer to any questions we encounter. We don't know what it's like to be responsible for our own knowledge and learning; why spend even a second trying to independently find the answer to something when you just can ask Siri? If the products are so expensive, we might as well use them.


We're also losing the ability to remember and remind ourselves of important things. Our parents are probably better at keeping appointments and remembering ingredients they need to buy than we are. When we can set reminders on our phone by simply saying aloud, "Alexa, set an appointment for Friday at 9 AM with Doctor Smith", there's no need to exert the mental energy and spare the brain cells it takes to remember such things; your phone will let you know that you have an appointment as the time approaches.

The most ironic thing about our devices reducing the time and effort it takes to complete simple tasks, in my opinion, is how we spend the time and energy we are saving. Sometimes when I'm done with my homework or watching a movie, I zone out by scrolling through my Instagram and Facebook feed for nearly twenty minutes. So, essentially, the time and energy I save using my devices are being used by the same devices, only in a different, more passive form.

Therefore, not only are we becoming less self-reliant and proactive, but recent technology is also making our generation more passive and apathetic. Does anyone know if Apple has created a device that can remove the invisible glue that's sticking our hands to our phones yet?

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