An Open Letter Of Gratitude To My High School

An Open Letter Of Gratitude To My High School

To some, going to an all-girls high school would seem like hell, to me it was the best four years of my life (so far).
1876
views

To my high school,

I feel like our relationship is very much like a parent and child relationship. Except, instead of having two parents, I had at least 36, but most definitely more. Throughout the four years I spent in your company, I loved and appreciated you, but also was a stubborn kid who wasn’t always a fan of the work and the rules and the parent’s guidance.

However, now that I have been away on my own for two years, my gratitude and sense of appreciation for everything you gave me has only grown and will continue to grow as I go throughout life.

The six classes a day that produced piles a homework were certainly not my favorite things in the moment. The stress was high and seemingly never-ending. But now, that I have five classes, most of which only meet twice a week but still produce the same amount of work, I know I can tackle these to-do lists of assignments because I already have four years of experience in my back pocket.

It is not just my time and stress management that grew, it was the academic work and the high expectations from high school classes that now provide me with confidence in the work I turn in to my professors today. Today when I am assigned a 7-10 page paper, I am not scared because I don't know where to start, instead, I receive the assignment knowing that while it may be a challenge and it will require time and energy, I have the skills and background necessary to do a good job on it.

However, strong work ethic and ability is not cultivated just because of the assignments a student hands in. The people who teach you how to do these assignments and do them well is what makes the difference. I am the scholar I am today because of the English teacher who taught me how to create an argument for a paper, and then after having me for two years pulled me aside in front of a group of my peers to tell me how much growth he had seen in me. To this day, whenever I get frustrated or unsure of my abilities, I think of this moment and it reminds me that I am good at what I am doing and I can get the work done.

The teachers I had, and even some who I didn’t, were constant cheerleaders for all of us at our school. The teacher from freshman year who always complimented me after working at open house events. The teacher who spent hours helping me work with another teacher to write a speech at the end of senior year. The teacher who selected me for a leadership position for a retreat.

These things, little things, really add up. Everyone who would smile, wave, and offer a greeting as we passed in the hallways. Knowing that I was in a place where I was supported, and encouraged made me want to go to school every day.

While there is the stereotype that four years of high school are the worst four years of a person’s life and once they graduate, and move on to the next thing in life they are filled with a sense of relief, I am glad this did not hold true for me. Conversely, when I received my diploma and realized at the end of the summer I would not be coming back to my high school, but would instead be moving across the country to begin college, I was filled with an immense sense of melancholy.

I knew that in some respects, the school had given me all that it could and that if I could have somehow found a way to sneak back for a fifth year, the experience would not be the same, however I don’t think I fully understood how much I would continue to learn from the school once I did arrive at college.

I have truly understood how much my school empowered me in so many different respects, but mainly to share my voice and be unafraid to pursue the things you most want and carry yourself with confidence, unafraid of what others may think.

The school also left a visible impression on me in the way I carry myself as well. On two separate occasions, once by the nurse at the doctor’s office, and the other by an admissions director who was familiar with the Seattle area who was on a college campus tour I was giving, I have been asked if I had gone to Holy Names with very little information given about my background. To be able to be recognized as an alumnus gives me so much pride and joy to have had the opportunity to go to this school and puts a spark within me to continue to give back to the school in whatever way possible in the future.

I do not think I will ever be able to properly articulate what my high school and my high school experience means to me. I am forever grateful and indebted to the teachers and friends who shaped me during my high school experience. I have had multiple conversations with my friends from high school in which we have contemplated where we would be today if it had not been for the education we received. I know I most definitely would not be at the college where I am today, pursuing the degree that I am, and having the internship I am.

My time in high school helped me find my passions and encouraged me to pursue them. I cannot wait to see what other impacts this school will have on me in the years to come, and I sincerely hope that one day I will be able to return and become a part of its day-to-day community once more in some other capacity.

From a very grateful alum,

C.M.

Cover Image Credit: Personal Photo

Popular Right Now

To All Incoming Freshmen, When You Get To College, Please Don't Be THAT Freshman

I am pretty sure we all know who I'm talking about.

94817
views

As we are all counting down the days to return to campus, students are looking forward to meeting new people and reuniting with old friends. And then, there is the freshman.

We have all been there. The eagerness and excitement have been slowly building up through months of summer vacation, all waiting for this moment. I understand the anxiousness, enthusiasm, and insecurities. The opportunity to meet new people and explore a new area is very intriguing. But let's be real, you are here to make memories and get an education. So here are a few pieces of advice from a former college freshman.

1. Don't be that freshman who follows their significant other to college

This is the boy or girl who simply can not think for themselves. The 17-year-old puts their own personal goals and interests aside to sacrifice for a six-month high school relationship. This will more than likely end at an end of semester transfer after the relationship has been tested for a month or two in college life. So if you want to really enjoy your freshman year, make your own decisions and do what is best for you.

2. Don't be that freshman who lets their parents pick their major

"You are not going to school just to waste my money."

This is a statement you might have heard from your parents. As true as it might seem, this is definitely not a good way to start your college years. If you are not majoring in something you can see yourself doing, you are wasting your time. You can major in biology, go to medical school, and make the best grades. But if deep down you don't want to be a doctor, you will NOT end up being a good doctor. When it comes to picking your major, you really have to follow your heart.

3. Don't be that freshman who gets overwhelmed with the first taste of freedom

Yes. It is all very exciting. You don't have a curfew, you don't have rules, you don't have anyone constantly nagging you, but let's not get carried away. Don't be the freshman who gets a tattoo on the first night of living on your own. Don't be the freshman who tries to drink every liquor behind the bar. Don't be the freshman who gets caught up being someone that they aren't. My best advice would be to take things slow.

4. Don't be that freshman who starts school isolated in a relationship

I'm not telling you not to date anyone during your freshman year. I am saying to not cut yourself off from the rest of the world while you date someone. Your first year on campus is such an amazing opportunity to meet people, but people are constantly eager to start dating someone and then only spend time with that person.

Be the freshman who can manage time between friends and relationships.

5. Don't be that freshman who can't handle things on their own

It is your first year on your own. Yes, you still need help from your parents. But at this point, they should not be ordering your textbooks or buying your parking pass. If you need something for a club or for class, YOU should handle it. If you're having roommate problems, YOU should handle it, not your parents. This is the real world and college is a great time for you to start building up to be the person you want to be in the future, but you can't successfully do that if your parents still deal with every minor inconvenience for you.

6. Don't be that freshman who only talks to their high school friends

I know your high school was probably amazing, and you probably had the coolest people go there. However, I believe that college is a great time to be on your own and experience new things. Meeting new people and going to new places will allow you to grow into a more mature person. There is a way to balance meeting new friends and maintaining friendships with childhood friends, and I am sure you will find that balance.

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

I Wish My Big Ten School Was Known For Education, Not Football

College football is great, but education is the reason that most students choose their university.

55
views

College football is a big deal to lots of universities. At schools like Ohio State, it is a really big deal. Although I personally don't care about football, I think that it is a great way to build a sense of community and camaraderie among students. It is fun, gives many schools a worldwide presence, and allows us students to have a sense of overwhelming pride in our school.

I just don't want that pride to outweigh the pride in the education itself. Unless you're a football player, you go to college primarily to learn and build your future. Football is fun, but sometimes I wish that society associates my school with an education rather than a single sport.

I cannot count the number of times that I told people that I go to OSU, and they responded by saying something along the lines of "Oh no, I'm a Michigan fan!" If they're referring to how The University of Michigan has some academic programs that are usually ranked higher than those at Ohio State, then I wouldn't blame them. Heck, it is ignorant not to acknowledge the truth in that-- if Michigan hadn't cost a thousand times more than what I'm paying now, I honestly might have chosen to be a student there.

Back to the point, though. I'm proud to go to OSU. At this time in life, I wouldn't want to be going anywhere else. Attending a school known for football was ultimately my decision, but that factor itself wasn't the reason. Admittedly, since I started college, I came to realize that all students aren't as football-crazy as I anticipated. One game day when I was studying in the library, a handful of guys came in yelling "OH" and expecting an "IO" back. They were met with silence until someone studying a few floors above them shouted back "F*** off!"

That story always reminds me that big schools like Ohio State really are for everyone. OSU excels in its education and wide variety of extracurricular opportunities. I don't love my school because of football-- I love my school because of the challenging academics, amazing faculty, and strong community. I think that it is time for the general public to see it that way too.

Related Content

Facebook Comments