Why I Am Afraid To Admit That I Am A Republican

Why I Am Afraid To Admit That I Am A Republican

Your political affiliation does not dictate what kind of person you are or who you get along with.
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There is a negative stigma associated with being a young Republican these days, or being a Republican of any age, really. I have found myself hesitant to admit that I am a registered Republican, which is a frustrating thing to deal with, especially during an election year. Here are just a few of the many reasons that I have become afraid to admit to my peers that I am a Republican.

1. The "Oh, you're a Republican?" voice.

There is really nothing worse than the look that you receive from people after telling them you are a Republican. The rolling of their eyes, followed by the disgusted tone they use when they ask, "Oh, you're a Republican?" It's almost as if they are asking you if you are an axe murderer, and it seems as though what they really want to say is, "Oh, you must hate poor and gay people." Somehow, being a Republican has become a negative attribute in the eyes of anyone that's not a member of the Party.

2. I'm tired of being told that I'm just copying my parent's beliefs.

Apparently, all young Republicans are only Republicans because their parents are, and they are simply regurgitating anything their parents have ever told them, because young Republicans must be unable to think for themselves and form their own political opinions. Why is this true for only young Republicans, and not young Democrats? Does being a Democrat mean that your parents never influenced your political opinions? I am afraid to tell people that I am a Republican, because the question of if my parents are also Republicans always follows.

3. People assume that every Republican is a member of the Tea Party.

You can't be a moderate Republican. As soon as you tell someone your political affiliation, they automatically assume that you are as far to the right on the political spectrum as it gets. People are always surprised when I tell them that I support liberal views on most social issues, such as gay marriage and abortion. In the eyes of many young Democrats, there are only the Jeff Sessions of the political world, and moderate Republicans just do not exist.

4. Donald Trump is a terrible representation of the Republican Party.

In this election year, it is impossible to not be associated with Donald Trump supporters when you tell someone that you're a Republican. You can almost guarantee that you will be asked if you are a Trump supporter, because come on, every young Democrat is a Bernie Sanders supporter, right? It has gotten to a point where I include the statement, "I hate Donald Trump," whenever I admit to my political affiliation.

5. Being a Republican somehow makes you wrong.

Many people treat Republicans as if their opinons are wrong, as if that's somehow possible. There is also the common assumption that people only support Republican values for religious reasons. While I will admit that there are many Republicans that still have a hard time separating Church from State, there are many logical reasons for being against national health care or gun control.


It shouldn't have to be this way. Anyone should feel comfortable telling anyone what Party he or she identifies with, regardless of if it's the Republican or Democratic Party. And this article is not to say that many Republicans do not treat Democrats in the same manner. The fact of the matter is that your political affiliation should not decide what kind of person you are or who you can get along with.

Cover Image Credit: bsuthevoice.org

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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You Can Call Me 'Divisive,' But Politics Are So Much More Than Just Personal Opinions

Some opinions don't deserve to be respected if those opinions disrespect someone else's literal existence.

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In the past four years or so, I've gotten pretty into politics. Admittedly, much of my exposure to it has been from the echo-chamber of Twitter, which provides me with liberal/leftist tweets on the daily. However, this isn't to say that I haven't considered the other side on many issues; I'm minoring in political science and am planning on becoming a journalist, so objectivity and the ability to see multiple sides of a topic are necessary for me.

However, I think that the line needs to be drawn somewhere. Because though the average citizen may feel removed from politics, the things that our government does affects each and every one of us--some more than others--so it's crucial that the policies that are being put in place are going to help us, not hurt us.

Now, this isn't to say that I hate someone as soon as they say that they're Republican or moderate. I have friends all across the political spectrum because as much as I hate some people's opinions, I'm realistic. I know that if I ostracize everyone with an opinion that differs from mine, I'd probably have no friends. However, out of all of the Republicans I'm friends with, none of them support Trump because Trump supporters, I'm not afraid to say, are where I draw the line. Supporting someone as hateful, bigoted, and downright ignorant as Donald Trump speaks volumes to your character if you ask me.

This article isn't an attack on our president, he's just a shining example of where I draw the line when it comes to politics. What a lot of people don't realize is that the view of political beliefs as a mere "personal opinion" is an extremely privileged outlook to have. This an outlook mostly reserved for white, straight, middle-class people (it doesn't work to be a man, either).

We are the people whom, no matter who's president, will probably be fine. I can personally say that, though I hate that Trump got elected, the only time his policies have negatively affected me or my family is when he shut down the government for three weeks (which, still, of course, was a huge problem). And unless his administration puts restrictions on women's reproductive rights, I'll probably be fine, however, I'm not naive. I know that there are many people who won't be. There are so many groups of people now, such as undocumented immigrants or transgender people, who are suffering under his administration.

At the end of the day, I can't be friends with someone who can support policies that break families apart, take away people's healthcare, restrict women's reproductive rights, or make lives harder for low-income people. "Agree to disagree" has no place in the topic of whether people deserve the right to just treatment and a decent life. I'm sorry, but if you support policies that are just a hair short of a straight-up human rights violation, that's not a difference of opinion; it's a difference of morality. And if that makes me divisive, then I can live with that. As long as I'm staying true to my beliefs, that's what matters to me.

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