6 Ways To Get Your Job Resume Noticed

6 Ways To Get Your Job Resume Noticed

Your CV is your passport to getting a job. It's your calling card. It's your brochure in a way. It sells your skills. It gives you a chance to show off those attributes you have that make you the perfect choice for your employer. Now that you have arrived in the job market fresh from college or from a previous company and looking for a fresh start - this is your time to take charge of your life.
Daisy
Daisy
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Applying for that job is all about displaying your suitable skills and selling yourself. Here is a short and simple list of 6 ways to get your CV noticed.

1. Tailor your CV / Resume to your Audience - make the effort to tailor your CV to suit the requirements of each particular job that you are applying. It will seriously increase and improve your chances of securing a job interview. A lot of people just spend time writing up and printing the one CV for all prospective employers. Big mistake. Tailor the CV to suit the job. Highlight your skills and experience in order of importance. Your most important skills go on top.

2. Outline your objectives - your personal statement (you do have a personal statement, don't you?) should highlight your professional attributes and goals, and emphasising why it is worth reading the rest of your CV. You should aim to to use no more than 50 words, making each sentence a key selling point. (Also see point 6.)

3. Use relevant job titles - rather than stating you were a "Tier 2 Promotions and Advertising Coordinator", replacing it with "Marketing Executive" so employers can instantly recognise your experience. Don't waffle or beat about the bush.
Don't include old Information on your resume

It's amazing how much useless old stale information is still included on a person's resume. Okay, you can be proud of your qualification from the year 199X, or (gulp - 198X) ...whatever. But if it is old and stale and useless, why continue keeping it there? Your information and qualifications have to be new or recent, not old and from a bygone era. Imagine your CV is a book you are about to write and publish. Who will read it? Who is your audience? Exactly, hardly anyone.


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No one wants to see your IT Diploma for Windows Millennium Edition or Windows 95, that is old hat and so gone! Likewise your degree in Economics from before the last recession (around 2008) is also out-dated, since so many things have changed. So do not include old stale qualifications and do not include too many jobs over many years. The last three jobs should suffice. If you changed jobs too many times, that might be flagged by future employers. So mention your present work and last three at the most. No more.

Make sure your resume shows a clear path of constant academic or work qualification updates or upgrades. And if you are only realizing this now, there is a very useful thing called night-school, and evening classes - that could be just the ticket to helping get those qualifications up to date.

4. Choose a clear layout - the last thing a recruiter wants to have is to hunt for the information that they are looking for. So don't hide that information amongst an array of elaborate graphics. Ask yourself, do you really need essay writing service and elaborate graphics - where simple graphics or a chart will do. Or not at all. Make it easy to read. Your interviewer isn't reading a Company Annual report on you. It has to be easy, brief, and promising enough to make them want to meet you to discuss your accomplishments with them. Companies are becoming more particular now about the kind of workers they want. If every candidate has the same degree in something, then whatever work experience is included could make the difference. If the best most eye-catching CV is picked, it is because that would-be candidate put more attention into making sure it is tailor-made to be noticed. Make that person you.

5. Show everyone what makes you unique - employers don't just buy skills. They are buying the person. What makes you stand out? Pick those qualities, and put them at the top. Show how you can make the company money (if necessary) and show how you can resolve the problems that they have. They are the two core issues at the heart of every job. Re-purpose that olde resume into a new more up-to-date resume that reflects you as the pro-active can-do person who is enabled, enthusiastic, team-focused, and flexible.

Super Tip for job Seekers: Join LinkedIn

The best way to be found is to be seen by as many employers and companies as possible. Every single week, my LinkedIn profile is seen by companies who want to employ me, or people like me. How are they finding me?

There is no magic to this, and no excuse not to join LinkedIn either since it is free. Sign up using your email account, acknowledge the link they send you, log into your new profile and then build it. Include a small but decent photo of yourself, and list your resume details as though it were the same thing. If you have an interesting profile, then companies will notice you.

The company LinkedIn sends you stats every week of how much your profile is being seen. The more active you are on LinkedIn, the more likely you will be noticed. LinkedIn is the worlds most popular business to business social media site.

6. Don't lie on your CV - this is a major reason people don't get jobs. They think that by putting little or bigger white lies in their job history, lists of accomplishments, courses, training and experience - they will get away with it. You won't. And that goes for your referees also. Your Interviewers will check you out. They will check your qualifications, then referees, then work history, they will check everything. They are used to people lying to them, despite the pleasant smiles you may see. It's all part of their job to pick the best candidate. The best candidate might be the most honest candidate.

Honesty gets you everywhere in life, in relationships, and in job interviews. Looking over a CV is always a wake up call, it shows your strengths and might show some weak areas. Deal with them honestly. If you can't substantiate something there, just leave it out.

If your CV is as close to perfect as can be, then you will feel more confident and its strength will reflect back in you. Be that person. And get that job.

Daisy
Daisy

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8 Things To Know About The 911 Dispatcher In Your Life

In honor of National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week

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For the first 18 years of my life, all I knew about 911 dispatchers was that they were the voice that came after the tone, from inside the pager on my dad's hip. The voice telling him where to go and for what. I had no idea after I turned 19 that I would soon become one of those voices. National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week this year is the week of April 14th-20th. I felt it appropriate to write my article this week focused on that, considering it is such a huge part of my life. For the rest of the world, it is just another week. For us, this is the one week out of the whole year that the focus is on the dispatcher, the one week where we don't feel so self-absorbed about saying what we do is nothing short of heroic. Here are some important things to know about the 911 dispatcher in your life.

1. We worry about you constantly

My biggest fear in this job is picking up the phone and hearing my loved one on the other end. No matter what the circumstance. The map zooms to the area of the county where my family and I reside, and my heart always sinks. I get a giant pit in my stomach because the very real reality is it may be someone I know and love. Don't be annoyed when we call you twice in one day or overly remind you to be safe. We are just always worried about our loved ones.

2. Our attention spans can be short

We are trained to get the pertinent information and details all within a matter of seconds. I can't speak for everyone on this, but I struggle a lot with paying attention when someone is talking to me, please forgive me if it feels as though I've stopped listening after a few minutes. I probably have. I've noticed that I listen very intently to the first couple minutes of a conversation and then my mind trails off. Nothing personal, just habit.

3. We have great hearing and listening skills

Most of us anyways. We can hear the person on the phone, the officer on one radio channel and the firefighter on the other, all at once. I have found that this skill comes in handy when trying to eavesdrop, also not as handy when you go out to dinner and can hear all five conversations going on around you. I have yet to master shutting that off when I am not at work.

4. We are hilarious

It could be a combination of using humor to deal with bad situations and spending twelve hours at a time in a little room together. But I think it’s that we are just freaking hilarious, nothing else to it. If you go the whole 12 hours without laughing, you're doing something wrong.

5. We have a very complicated love-hate relationship with our jobs

I love what I do, and I truly believe I was meant to put on that headset. Everything happens for a reason and my education plans out of high school didn't work out because I was supposed to be here doing this instead. I love what I do. I hate it sometimes too though. I remember specifically once taking a phone call about an hour before my shift was done. As soon as I got into my vehicle to go home, I bawled my eyes out and swore to myself that I was never stepping back into a comm center again. I hated my job with a burning passion that day. My next scheduled shift, I went back to work because I love it too. See, it doesn't even make sense it's just complicated.

6. We are tired

Believe it or not, this career can be incredibly exhausting. Someone once told me "You just sit at a desk for twelve hours, that can't be that hard." Physically that's right, we just sit there. Mentally and emotionally the first phone call of the shift can drain you and then you still have a little over 11 hours to go. I won't go into details on that but trust us when we say it was a bad call. We are tired. Some of my days off I just sleep all day not because I'm physically exhausted but because my mind needs that much time to recharge.

7. We are crazy

I really have nothing more to say other than no sane person would be a 911 dispatcher. We are all a little 10-96 in the best way possible.

8. We love harder than most

We love strangers we have never met, we love our officers that piss us off daily over the radio, and we love our co-workers that drive us nuts sometimes. It takes someone incredibly strong to save a life through the phone and someone even stronger to go back after they didn't. With that strength comes a weakness of vulnerability, we know our hearts will break more often than others, and we still continue to put on that headset to help others. The people with the biggest hearts work in a dispatch center. If you are lucky enough to be loved by one don't take them for granted.

The list could go on and on. Dispatchers possess so many skills and qualities that most people will never acquire in their lifetime. People think 911 and picture the police officer, the firefighter, the paramedic often completely forgetting the 911 dispatcher. For us, that's okay because other than this one week out of the year, we don't expect praise or thank you. When it comes down to it, we love what we do and we would do it no matter what.

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