6 Political Commentators Every Young Conservative Should Know

6 Political Commentators Every Young Conservative Should Know

TV, Radio, Social Media or YouTube, these six conservatives know what it means to be right.
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In the world of leftist-leaning mainstream media and pop culture, it can be hard to find journalists or political commentators that young conservatives can relate to. In that same respect, it can be hard to get past the old, rich, or white guy perception represented by many traditional right-leaning or conservative media organizations. Or is it? For today’s modern young conservative interested in learning more about the American political system, here are six great political commentators to start with:

Mark Levin

If you chose to enter the sphere of talk radio, on weeknights from 6 to 9 p.m., you will find the exceptionally intelligent commentary of top-rated radio personality Mark Levin. The Constitutional lawyer and president of the Landmark Legal Foundation is a best-selling author and a leader of the modern conservative movement. Levin is known for his unique hosting style. This includes loud, passionate outbursts and a commitment to referencing liberal figures and political groups by only to most “Levin-iest” of given nicknames.

Tomi Lahren

If your friends are fellow conservatives, or you have been active on Facebook in the past year, you are probably familiar with Tomi Lahren. Just 23 years old, Lahren’s “Final Thoughts” segments have gained millions of views on Facebook video. She was the target of personal attacks and threats from fans of Beyoncé after Lahren’s SuperBowl halftime commentary went viral. Like many modern conservative figures, Lahren is unapologetic in her commentary. However, what makes her different is her active pursuit to bring opposing viewpoints to her show, weeknights on The Blaze.

Steven Crowder

Originally the youngest contributor to ever earn a contract at Fox News, comedian Steven Crowder represents the modern funny guy in the conservative movement. Crowder’s website and weekly radio show, Lowder with Crowder, covers topics ranging for pop culture, to American politics to world news, in a format and style engaging for the anti-SJW generation. Always open to embracing the “alt-right” community of conservatism, for those looking for a fresh perspective from establish media organizations, Lowder with Crowder is the place to go.

Ben Shapiro

When the late conservative leader Andrew Breitbart includes you in the dedication of his final book, you are handed the utmost respect in the conservative community. Harvard law grad Ben Shapiro is considered one of the premiere young thought leaders on the political right. Supported by his catchphrase, “facts don’t care about your feelings,” there is no controversial topic or mainstream media talking head Shapiro refuses to take on. That includes the company founded by his own mentor, Breitbart.com. Shapiro can be found giving speeches across college campuses and heading up The Daily Wire as editor-in-chief.

Dana Loesch

Host of “Dana” on the Blaze Network, Dana Loesch is a hardcore 2nd amendment advocate and ultra-conservative. Loesch was not always a conservative, but shares her transformation to common sense, constitutional values proudly. She often contributes to stories and analysis on CNN and Fox News and is most well known for her strong-held beliefs and fiery personality. Loesch is the modern conservative’s top momma bear.

Milo Yiannopoulous

Flamboyant and fabulous, Milo Yiannopoulous first gained traction as an outspoken contributor during the GamerGate controversy. Absolutely unapologetic is Milo’s style, so much so that many accuse Twitter of removing his “verified” user badge because of complaints that his tweets were hate speech. Originally from the UK, Yiannopoulous’s commentary on feminism, free speech and other social-libertarian related issues is as enlightening as it is entertaining. Leader of the alt-right movement, you can find him stirring up leftist and social justice warriors on Twitter, or debating your right to free speech on college campuses across the US.

Cover Image Credit: Conservapedia

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'As A Woman,' I Don't Need To Fit Your Preconceived Political Assumptions About Women

I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

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It is quite possible to say that the United States has never seen such a time of divisiveness, partisanship, and extreme animosity of those on different sides of the political spectrum. Social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are saturated with posts of political opinions and are matched with comments that express not only disagreement but too often, words of hatred. Many who cannot understand others' political beliefs rarely even respect them.

As a female, Republican, college student, I feel I receive the most confusion from others regarding my political opinions. Whenever I post or write something supporting a conservative or expressing my right-leaning beliefs and I see a comment has been left, I almost always know what words their comment will begin with. Or in conversation, if I make my beliefs known and someone begins to respond, I can practically hear the words before they leave their mouth.

"As a woman…"

This initial phrase is often followed by a question, generally surrounding how I could publicly support a Republican candidate or maintain conservative beliefs. "As a woman, how can you support Donald Trump?" or "As a woman, how can you support pro-life policies?" and, my personal favorite, "As a woman, how did you not want Hillary for president?"

Although I understand their sentiment, I cannot respect it. Yes, being a woman is a part of who I am, but it in no way determines who I am. My sex has not and will not adjudicate my goals, my passions, or my work. It will not influence the way in which I think or the way in which I express those thoughts. Further, your mention of my sex as the primary logic for condemning such expressions will not change my adherence to defending what I share. Nor should it.

To conduct your questioning of my politics by inferring that my sex should influence my ideology is not only offensive, it's sexist.

It disregards my other qualifications and renders them worthless. It disregards my work as a student of political science. It disregards my hours of research dedicated to writing about politics. It disregards my creativity as an author and my knowledge of the subjects I choose to discuss. It disregards the fundamental human right I possess to form my own opinion and my Constitutional right to express that opinion freely with others. And most notably, it disregards that I am an individual. An individual capable of forming my own opinions and being brave enough to share those with the world at the risk of receiving backlash and criticism. All I ask is for respect of that bravery and respect for my qualifications.

Words are powerful. They can be used to inspire, unite, and revolutionize. Yet, they can be abused, and too comfortably are. Opening a dialogue of political debate by confining me to my gender restricts the productivity of that debate from the start. Those simple but potent words overlook my identity and label me as a stereotype destined to fit into a mold. They indicate that in our debate, you cannot look past my sex. That you will not be receptive to what I have to say if it doesn't fit into what I should be saying, "as a woman."

That is the issue with politics today. The media and our politicians, those who are meant to encourage and protect democracy, divide us into these stereotypes. We are too often told that because we are female, because we are young adults, because we are a minority, because we are middle-aged males without college degrees, that we are meant to vote and to feel one way, and any other way is misguided. Before a conversation has begun, we are divided against our will. Too many of us fail to inform ourselves of the issues and construct opinions that are entirely our own, unencumbered by what the mainstream tells us we are meant to believe.

We, as a people, have become limited to these classifications. Are we not more than a demographic?

As a student of political science, seeking to enter a workforce dominated by men, yes, I am a woman, but foremost I am a scholar, I am a leader, and I am autonomous. I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

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Dear Celebrities, You Are Not Politicians So Leave Your Political Opinions Out Of Your Media Feed

Don't let your favorite artist change your own opinion or your vote.

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The 2018 American Music Awards hit the lowest amount of viewers in the AMA's history. The three-hour long show received an average of 6.8 million viewers, which is about 3 million less than last year. This isn't the only year that the AMA's views have decreased and not the only award show as well. In fact, in January, the Grammys also hit their lowest viewers since 2008.

So, what could be the cause of these lower rankings? While politics have always been somewhat included in award shows, has it gone so far to drive viewers away?

Historically, award winners have pointed to specific issues affecting our current political climate or some cause the celebrity supports. However, within the last few years, it has become more pointed to specific people.

With viewers slowly decreasing while political slurs to politicians grow, it's safe to say that there's a negative correlation between them both. This could easily be a cause of shows receiving fewer viewers every year, along with the lower rankings.

Imagine, you're watching a three-hour show of celebrities making fun of your beliefs or the person you're planning on voting for. Would you keep watching? Would you come back next year to watch the same show with the same belief shaming?

Recently, Taylor Swift spoke out on her Instagram about not supporting Marsha Blackburn for Senate and how she will instead be voting for Phil Bredesen for Senate and Jim Cooper for House of Representatives. At the end of the post, she encourages fans to go out and vote.

Blackburn quickly answered saying how she does support women and wants to end violence against women. She even states how she is active in abuse centers as well as child advocacy centers.

While there is no issue for telling fans to go out and vote, it's important to let the fans (of any celebrity) to do their own research as well as make their own opinions.

A voter should not be swayed by what their favorite celebrity has to say about a politician.

While this can hurt the celebrity by causing them to lose a fanbase (the Dixie Chicks for example), it can also make fans feel as though their opinions aren't important, invalid, or even wrong.

It's great that Swift caused such an uproar in voter registrations and that more peoples' voices will be heard due to that. Even so, her, and any celebrity really, could easily persuade their fans to simply vote without telling them who to vote for.

As a student, I hope that you do your research and vote for what you think is right for our society. Go to vote.org for more information on how to register.

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