Sad On New Year's Day

To Everyone Who Cried On New Year's Day

It's hard to accept sadness on a day that's supposed to be filled with happiness.

paris
paris
3
views

There's something about New Year's Day that always brings up emotions I didn't even know I was holding onto. But what is it exactly that makes New Year's Day so emotional and, sometimes, even sad?

Around the holidays, there's such heightened pressure to be happy. It's hard to accept your true feelings while desperately holding onto the idealized way that things are "supposed" to be. Everyone struggles with their emotions sometimes, but there's such a sense of guilt that comes along with feeling sad on the holidays. It almost seems like if you're not having the best day of your life, you're doing something wrong.

In my experience, I always fail to keep those bottled-up, negative emotions inside. These feelings almost always rise to the surface with more intensity than they would've had if I had just dealt with them originally. Before I know it, all of my unacknowledged sadness, confusion, and worries from the past year are spilling out of me, and I have no idea how to even begin to manage it all.

If you cried on New Year's Day as I did, here is what I want to tell you:

You don't ever have to apologize for feeling a certain way. Emotions are strange, and the worst ones always seem to show up at the wrong times. But making yourself feel guilty for feeling them as if you've missed out on or ruined something, will only make you feel worse in the long run. Let yourself feel, and let those feelings run their course. Pushing down your true emotions to power through an arbitrary holiday is not healthy, and it doesn't really make sense either.

You do not have to worry about starting the year off on a "bad" note because being sad isn't a bad thing, it's just something that happens sometimes. Feeling sad is inevitable. This year is not predestined, it is what you decide to make it. This year will become what you want it to be. So don't take no for an answer, and don't take melancholia for a curse. The next 364 days are yours to fill with whatever you choose.

Remember that the best times cannot exist without some sad times along the way. All of this is just part of your journey. And if it just feels like a whole lot of bad times right now, at least you know that the good times are waiting ahead.

Be happy. Be sad. Be whatever you need to be in this moment. Whatever you are, just let yourself be.

Popular Right Now

6 Telling Signs That You’re Meant To Travel The World

I hope you experience new places and feel so alive and confident in them.

3
views

I'm not sure when I fell in love with the notion of traveling and experiencing new places. Maybe it was my mother's efforts to make any long trip into a mini vacation. Maybe it was when I began to learn French in high school, and my first short trip to Europe. Maybe it was solidified after my 6-week study abroad in England.

Or maybe, it's just in your blood.

I think it was a culmination of all these things that has fueled my desire to travel, but even if you haven't experienced these same, or similar things, you may love traveling too. Maybe you just don't know it yet.

Some quirks and realizations I had about my constant underlying desire to travel were seemingly everyday occurrences. They are feelings and shifts in perspective that I was not always prepared for, and that have become a part of myself. If any, or all, of these signs apply to you, you might be a traveler at heart.

1. You get jealous every time you see photos of people's travels and vacations, even on TV

We are a pretty jealous species, and our heavy reliance on technology and social media has not changed that. If anything, it's made it worse. I feel a whole range of emotions when I see someone's quick snap from various places in the world. They make me look around at my current place in life and residence and I immediately get the travel bug.

2. Your idea of saving money and planning for the future is for possible plane tickets, not a house

Growing up, we are all told about the inevitable big purchases in life, most notable being a house. While I enjoy some fantasizing over the kind of house I will have, that time spent in nothing in comparison to the time I've spent planning trips in my mind. When I save, of course, there are necessities to think of, but my goal is not the stability of a house, but of plane tickets and new destinations.

3. You love to learn new things about new places

I was drawn to take French in high school, not that my small school had many language options, and I could never explain why. Everything I learned about the language and the culture fascinated me, especially when I compared it to the familiarity of the US. This also played into the historian in me, which makes every new place visited also a journey to the past.

4. You can't picture yourself living in one place, at least not indefinitely

When I was growing up, I could never picture myself in the future. I didn't see myself going away to college and definitely didn't expect to study abroad during those years. This has changed in me so that now, I don't think about a stable situation in my future but am open to change and movement. I have places and people that I call home, but through them, I feel the freedom and confidence to change up my surroundings. After two years of living in the same apartment, for example, I'm ready to move out and move on.

5. You feel a new sense of comfort and confidence in a new place

I have quite a bit of anxiety when it comes to big and/or important situations. But in addition to that, I have a tendency to be socially awkward as well. Maybe part of my personal growth is due to simply maturing, but there was a sense of confidence and security I didn't expect when I traveled. I faced new experiences with little hesitation compared to my normal behavior, and I felt comfortable in new scenarios. I highly recommend.

6. You worry more about your terrible passport photo than your terrible driver's license photo

Any official picture of me is undoubtedly bad. But, for as little as I get to use my passport, I am much more aware of that terrible photo than the one I carry almost every day. My passport symbolizes who I am in the world and the experiences I've had, which hold more weight for me than the plastic card that lets me drive. This may seem weird or excessive, but it's just a part of holding travel close to your heart.

I may fall into the cliché of wanting to spread my wings after living most of my life in a small, rural town, but I don't think that fully explains how I feel. It's not just that I want to leave what I know since I still love it and call it home.

I want to experience so much in so many places, probably because I have this mentality. Wanting to travel is not an insult to your "regular" life, it's a part of you that wants to experience both. I hope you see those pictures on Instagram of a vacation and that motivates you to take your own. I hope you experience new places and feel so alive and confident in them.

I hope we get to travel because it's what we would love to do.

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

An Open Letter From The Daughter Of A Drug Addict

"Someone telling you, 'I love you' doesn't necessarily mean that they do. Look for love not in words, but in actions. If somebody loves you, they are going to show it."

2
views

It's hard to absorb the fact that a father could love himself more than his own child. Unfortunately, though, it is a reality that I must face every day of my life, however directly or indirectly. You never think it's humanly possible for a father to love himself more unconditionally than he loves his child - but there is one scenario in which this disturbing circumstance is found tangible- when he is an addict and is selfish. It is so hard to see somebody that is supposed to love you more than anything, love themselves only. Watching somebody prioritize themselves and their addiction over you- it's both a blessing and a curse. Naturally, we are raised to believe parents are the most perfect human beings, and if something is not okay, they will be the last to breakdown. We are raised to believe our parents love us unconditionally and are inherently supposed to prioritize us, their children, over anything else in the world.

It has taken me seventeen years to break this barrier, and finally accept the fact that some parents are not so perfect. For me, that parent who broke the barrier for me was my father. It hurts to know that the person who is supposed to love you most in this world simply does not. But, it's an important fact to swallow, and I am satisfied to say that I've finally accepted this circumstance, although I've tumultuously tried to combat the feelings and deny the horrors of rejection in the past, all through my adolescence. I have, to my benefit, fortunately, realized one thing that I believe I needed to figure out for myself- the fact that love is not implicitly implied. It is not just 'there.' It is cultivated, nurtured, and created. It is evident in actions, words, and physical motions and gestures. Love is not something you can just write off aimlessly. Someone telling you, "I love you" doesn't necessarily mean that they do. Look for love not in words, but in actions. If somebody loves you, they are going to show it.

They will show up.

They will be there.

They will not make you wait.

They will not make you beg for their attention.

They will give love to you unconditionally and without request.

They will show you they love you in the smallest ways, through the smallest actions which ultimately are the most important.

They will be a present and constant part of your life. If something comes up or they are withheld from you, they will make it up to you.

They will stay true to their promises.

It is such a hard pill to swallow. Realizing that somebody who is supposed to love you does not love you in the way that they are supposed to. But sometimes in life, we have to accept things for what they are, raw and honest. I have had to come to terms with this fact, even though it genuinely hurts me... Some people aren't going to love you. Is this wrong? Maybe. But can I change this? No. Addiction isn't a disease. It's a decision. An indirect one, perhaps, but it is, in fact, a solid decision and it can be avoided at all costs.

You have to choose yourself at some point. We all want to save the addicts in our life- we want to save them from themselves. But at some point- we must choose ourselves.

Having a parent who is an addict is one of the hardest things that I have had to overcome. The way I see it, however, everything that happens to you makes you stronger. That quote reigns true- if it doesn't kill you, it simply makes you stronger.

To everyone out there dealing with the consequences of having an addict as an essential part of their life, keep being strong. As hard of a pill as it is to swallow, everything happens for some reason. Let this be your closure. When you can't find one good reason, let it be that this situation you are dealing with will make you stronger in the end. I guarantee it.

Related Content

Facebook Comments