20 Things To Do In Las Vegas When You're Under 21

20 Things To Do In Las Vegas When You're Under 21

"Why are you going to Vegas? You aren't even 21!"
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If you have yet to turn the glorious age of 21, but still want to venture to Sin City, you are not alone. Every summer my friends and I take a trip to Las Vegas, and we have the time of our lives, the only catch being that we are all underage. One might question the reasoning behind our seemingly useless trip, but to heck with those people. They simply do not understand that Vegas is not just for those who are above the age of 21, anyone can have a little fun in Sin City!

1. Treasure Island Pool (or any pool with no age restrictions)

Each year we stay at Treasure Island, so we may be a bit biased, but it really is a good time. There is a DJ on weekends with great music, and for the past two years, almost the entire pool has engaged in some sort of choreographed dance to the Dougie or Cha Cha Slide.

2. The High Roller Observation Wheel

At 520-feet in diameter, this is the highest observation wheel in the world. At $24.94 for a day pass or $34.95 for a night pass, the cost is relatively reasonable. Plus walking around the Linq promenade where High Roller is located is really neat. There are a ton of places to eat or grab dessert nearby, and there's a Sprinkles Cupcakes shop!

3. Fremont Street

Live bands and DJs are often here, plus it's just a really cool place to walk around. You can also zip line down this street, which I think would be really fun.

4. Bellagio Fountains

My all-time favorite! There is a show every 15 minutes, and they are breathtaking!

5. Eat

Well duh! I don't know if you're aware, but Vegas has buffets galore. Last time I was in Vegas with my family we bought a 24-hour buffet pass which gave us access to any buffet at any Harrah's Casino for 24 hours. I've never been so full in my life, but it was so worth it. The best, in my opinion, is the Rio Buffet, but the Flamingo one has cotton candy, so who is the real winner here? If you're not into buffets (why?) here are some of my favorite places to eat in Vegas:

  • Toby Keith's I Love This Bar & Grill (Harrah's): Perfect for the country music loving folks.
  • Señor Frogs (Treasure Island): Very interactive, DJ, karaoke, occasional dancing and conga line with free shots
  • Serendipity 3 (Caesar's Palace): Get the frozen hot chocolate, you won't regret it.

6. The Roller Coaster at New York-New York

At $14 per ride, this is a great way to check out the New York-New York Hotel & Casino.

7. The Bellagio

Check out the beautiful conservatory and botanical garden at Bellagio, which is also free (yay!) and themed depending on the time of year.

8. The Venetian

Go window shopping and you might catch a random show with actors on stilts. The real attraction, however, is the gondola rides ($18.50 per person).

9. Volcano show outside the Mirage

The volcano erupts at night, once every hour until 11 p.m. Free!

10. Sirens show outside Treasure Island


This is also free but arrive early to get a spot.

11. Shopping!

The strip itself offers so many places to shop. Almost every casino offers some type of themed shop. Planet Hollywood and Treasure Island have their own malls and The Forum Shops at Caesars offer luxury brands (a girl can dream right?). All along the strip, there are souvenir shops, but I really love M&M;'s World and Sweet Factory.

12. Circus Circus Adventuredome Theme Park

You can go on the rides, play laser tag or hang out at the arcade.

13. The Rides at Stratosphere

If you're not afraid of heights you can take an elevator up 101 stories to the top of the Stratosphere and partake in several death-defying rides at the top or even bungee jump off the side (good luck with that).

14. See a Show

From Cirque du Soleil to the Blue Man Group or even Britney — if you're willing to spend the money there is a show for you.

15. The Eiffel Tower at Paris

Take a ride to the top for only $14 during the day or $19 at night.

16. The Las Vegas Sign

Take a picture in front of the iconic sign, because did you really go to Vegas if you didn't post about it on Instagram?

17. Flamingo Wildlife Habitat

At none other than the Flamingo Hotel & Casino. If you walk to the back and go outside, they have flamingos everywhere. The pool here is also really fun and has great slides.

18. Take a Picture with an Elvis Impersonator

You might have to tip them, but come on! It's Elvis in Vegas!

19. Siegfried & Roy's Secret Garden & Dolphin Habitat


Go visit the beautiful bottlenose dolphins, white tigers, white lions and leopards for $20 admission.

20. Walk the strip

Especially at night, the Strip is all lit up and filled with people. I like to go see all the casinos and take pictures.


Have fun, kiddos! Viva Las Vegas!

Cover Image Credit: pexels

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College As Told By Junie B. Jones

A tribute to the beloved author Barbara Parks.
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The Junie B. Jones series was a big part of my childhood. They were the first chapter books I ever read. On car trips, my mother would entertain my sister and me by purchasing a new Junie B. Jones book and reading it to us. My favorite part about the books then, and still, are how funny they are. Junie B. takes things very literally, and her (mis)adventures are hilarious. A lot of children's authors tend to write for children and parents in their books to keep the attention of both parties. Barbara Park, the author of the Junie B. Jones series, did just that. This is why many things Junie B. said in Kindergarten could be applied to her experiences in college, as shown here.

When Junie B. introduces herself hundreds of times during orientation week:

“My name is Junie B. Jones. The B stands for Beatrice. Except I don't like Beatrice. I just like B and that's all." (Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, p. 1)

When she goes to her first college career fair:

"Yeah, only guess what? I never even heard of that dumb word careers before. And so I won't know what the heck we're talking about." (Junie B. Jones and her Big Fat Mouth, p. 2)

When she thinks people in class are gossiping about her:

“They whispered to each other for a real long time. Also, they kept looking at me. And they wouldn't even stop." (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 66)

When someone asks her about the library:

“It's where the books are. And guess what? Books are my very favorite things in the whole world!" (Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, p. 27)

When she doesn't know what she's eating at the caf:

“I peeked inside the bread. I stared and stared for a real long time. 'Cause I didn't actually recognize the meat, that's why. Finally, I ate it anyway. It was tasty...whatever it was." (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 66)

When she gets bored during class:

“I drew a sausage patty on my arm. Only that wasn't even an assignment." (Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren, p. 18)

When she considers dropping out:

“Maybe someday I will just be the Boss of Cookies instead!" (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 76)

When her friends invite her to the lake for Labor Day:

“GOOD NEWS! I CAN COME TO THE LAKE WITH YOU, I BELIEVE!" (Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, p. 17)

When her professor never enters grades on time:

“I rolled my eyes way up to the sky." (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 38)

When her friends won't stop poking her on Facebook:


“Do not poke me one more time, and I mean it." (Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, p. 7)

When she finds out she got a bad test grade:

“Then my eyes got a little bit wet. I wasn't crying, though." (Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, p. 17)

When she isn't allowed to have a pet on campus but really wants one:

“FISH STICK! I NAMED HIM FISH STICK BECAUSE HE'S A FISH STICK, OF COURSE!" (Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, p. 59)

When she has to walk across campus in the dark:

“There's no such thing as monsters. There's no such thing as monsters." (Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed, p. 12)

When her boyfriend breaks her heart:

“I am a bachelorette. A bachelorette is when your boyfriend named Ricardo dumps you at recess. Only I wasn't actually expecting that terrible trouble." (Junie B. Jones Is (almost) a Flower Girl, p. 1)

When she paints her first canvas:


"And painting is the funnest thing I love!" (Junie B. Jones and her Big Fat Mouth, p. 61)

When her sorority takes stacked pictures:

“The biggie kids stand in the back. And the shortie kids stand in the front. I am a shortie kid. Only that is nothing to be ashamed of." (Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed, p. 7)

When she's had enough of the caf's food:

“Want to bake a lemon pie? A lemon pie would be fun, don't you think?" (Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed p. 34)

When she forgets about an exam:

“Speechless is when your mouth can't speech." (Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren, p. 54)

When she finds out she has enough credits to graduate:

“A DIPLOMA! A DIPLOMA! I WILL LOVE A DIPLOMA!" (Junie B. Jones is a Graduation Girl p. 6)

When she gets home from college:

"IT'S ME! IT'S JUNIE B. JONES! I'M HOME FROM MY SCHOOL!" (Junie B. Jones and some Sneaky Peaky Spying p. 20)

Cover Image Credit: OrderOfBooks

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As Millennials, We Are The Loneliest People

From one lonely person to another, let's smash this stigma.

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If you're a millennial and you're feeling extremely lonely, you certainly aren't alone in that feeling. We are often far too afraid to talk about it because society puts such a stigma on this condition. But I am here to tell you that we, as millennials, are the loneliest age group. so let's smash the stigma and acknowledge this feeling once and for all.

As a (nearly) 20-year-old, I never imagined at this age I would think about loneliness. I would always equate that word with elderly people who are away from all of their loved ones, enduring the sullen monotony of a nursing home. Of course, throughout school, I would feel lonely on occasion--the one stretch of the summer when all of my friends were away while I was home, the period of time I was grieving the loss of a loved one, or even particular days when I was just sadder than usual.

But the loneliness faded away after a brief period of healing. I knew my friends would come back and life would return to normal eventually. It was a mood that was sucky but it was only that: a mood.

However, these past two years have been the loneliest years of my life.

Chronic loneliness is different from the loneliness I've ever experienced before. I didn't think living a couple of hours away from home, living in a community of 40,000 people, starting an independent life would leave me so empty, experiencing a far greater level of emotional pain. I kept myself busy in the community, joining various clubs and programs around campus, attending events, and trying to reach out to others, but it seemed like I never belonged anywhere— in my college or in the greater society.

It didn't take me very long to believe that my life and my hurting were not normal.

A counselor on campus, who was a fully grown adult, was "confused" that I felt this way. I "seemed normal" and normal people have tons of friends in college. People would false empathize with me that they "felt that way when they were adjusting" but I'm fully adjusted and feel no less lonely. I call and text people often but everyone is always "busy," and I have no place in the midst of their crazy lives and other friends. In fact, it's been almost six months since I last hung out with a group of people.

But in fact, what I was feeling wasn't so abnormal after all.

The loneliest generation is not the elderly people who live by themselves without family members by their sides. It's us. We can talk to people every day. Since living away, I've talked to the dining hall staff, cashiers at stores downtown, and the one person who knows all the answers in my information science class, but the quality of the bonds was not what they were at home. They did not instantly make me feel like I had tons of friends. The quality bonds we have lost in this stretch of time, a brief stretch of time where we have to quickly develop friendships.

So how can we end our suffering?

We need to open up about how we're feeling. I was convinced I was the only one who felt this way for the longest time, which worsened the extent of this pain. In fact, our chronic loneliness can damage our health in the same way that smoking 15 cigarettes daily can do. But in order to change our health (and our happiness level for God's sake), we need to make it known that us young people are the lonely ones. And maybe then we can help others in our situation who eat lunch alone, who stay in at night, not by choice, who rarely get calls or texts on their phones.

From one lonely millennial to the rest of them, it is time to combat this feeling for good.

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