15 Struggles Of Being A Theatre Major

15 Struggles Of Being A Theatre Major

It's not all fun and games... even though we do play a lot of games.
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Thanks to popular culture and mass media, we all know college is a weird place, but somehow the theater department provides a level of surrealism rarely attained by any other major on campus. On a day to day basis, your life in the theater department is no more reliable than a coin toss--sometimes it's fantastic, but other times, it's exceptionally painful. Here are 15 moments that will leave you wondering whether tis nobler in the mind to suffer the crazy nonsense of this outrageous department.

1. Being the “new kid” has never been more terrifying.

It’s nearly impossible to start a conversation with someone because everyone’s already deep in the middle of a conversation. And you can’t help but wonder if all the “clique” stereotypes are true.

2. You accept that you’ll be single and alone for a while.



Let’s just say if you’re a straight, cis-gendered individual looking for love, it’s not easy. But if you do manage to date someone and break up, there's a good chance you blew your one shot.

So, if you really want to date, you may just be forced to swallow your pride and re- download Tinder... even though you swore never again.

3. You don’t know what other involvements are.

What even is life outside of EO Bull? When was the last time I left this building?

4. Everyone knows everything about everyone.



Secrets and personal problems spread like wildfire. Trust no one.

5. When you’re not cast, you feel like a lost puppy.

You'll probably wonder what you did last semester before getting cast, why is there no director breathing down your neck to be off book, and why there is no stage manager ordering you to be somewhere from 6 to 10 each night.

And there's a good chance you'll wander around the theater building when there's no reason for you to be these just so you can remember the “good ole days."

6. Your family will say, “Of course you got straight As. You don’t take real classes.”

Excuse me? I’m sorry, but I deserve this grade. I earned this grade. With lines to memorize, scenes to rehearse, history to memorize, shop hours to complete, and songs to brush up on, I have NO. FREE. TIME.

Oh, and let's not forget, we're still required to take all those gen-ed courses.

7. You’re savage AF when you’re at a callback or audition.

You might be best friends with someone, but if they’re going for the same role as you, there's a good chance you've considered shunning them for a week.

Or maybe that’s just me?

I mean, what even is sportsmanship?

8. Getting tickets for the family is a struggle and a half if the show is being held in JP Adler Studio Theatre.

Especially when all the introduction to theater classes are forced to see the show. You'd think the professors would know by now that there are just not enough seats. As actors, we'd rather perform the show for five people who actually want to be there, as opposed to a full house full of people who are on their phone or sleeping.

9. It’s impossible not to compare yourself to other people in the department. Enough said.

10. You still don’t know wtf you’re doing half the time and struggle with abandoning the concept of “getting it right.”

11. You will never watch anything ever again for the sheer enjoyment of it.

What type of acting choice was that?

12. If one person gets sick, the whole department gets sick, and dear god, if anyone ever got mono ever we’d all be toast.

13. You sit there during conversations your friends have not understanding the musical theater references.

Maybe you’ll look it up when you’re done writing all those *pointless* reflection papers you pull out of your butt 15 minutes before they're due.

14. There are so many things that are not in the curriculum that you're dying to learn.

Sorry, Method and Meisner. I'm sort of in a relationship with Stanislavski. He's not that great. Sigh.

15. There’s a good chance you’ll face the dilemma, “Is getting a degree worth it?”


Or should I just go to New York or Los Angeles and see what happens?

But for whatever reason, you stay in school, and despite all the highs and lows, you enjoy it.

Cover Image Credit: Flickr

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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13 Thoughts Broadcast Journalism Majors Have When Piecing Together Their First News Story

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So you've decided that you want to be a Broadcast Journalist?

Many different thoughts go through you're while trying to first off figure out what story you want to pursue. After that, it's just a matter of getting everything that is needed for it and then putting it together.

For all clarity and purposes, I have already turned in my first news story, however as I was completing it, some (if not all) of these thoughts (or a variation of them) came across my mind at some point during the process.

1. Ok, so what are the important parts to my story?

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And how do I convey those things to my viewers?

2. What b-roll should I get?

B-roll is supplemental or alternative footage intercut with the main shot.

3. Do I have all the interviews I need?

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Who are the essential figures in this story?

4. What's my angle? How do I stick to it?

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Who do I need to interview for it?

5. What questions should I ask in my interview?

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And more importantly, What type of questions will get me the answers I want?

6. What are the important facts?

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Should they all be included?

7. Do my voice overs cover everything that my interviews don't?

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What else is needed for this story?

8. Agh, my video is over the 1 minute and 30 seconds allowed time.

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Do I reduce it or do I leave it as is? I guess it depends on how much its over.

9. How should I say my tageline at the end of the video?

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The tagline is when the reporter says their name and their station affiliation at the end of their story.

10. Should I include a standup? Where should it be?

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What do I want to say?

11. Should I include a graphic?

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Is there something that can be said in a list form that the viewers need to see? Is it symptoms of a disease? Event details?

12. How do I make my interviews connect with my voice overs?

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Does what I am saying make sense?

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Should I add a NAT pop here? What SOT (Sound on Tape) do I want to use?

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