15 Plants that Are Easy to Take Care of

15 Plants that Are Easy to Take Care of

For those who aren't exactly green thumbs.

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Do you consider yourself a plant killer?

You get so excited to bring home a new plant to only wake up the next day and find it wilting. You try everything you think is right to revive but unfortunately, it's not coming back to life.

Rather than give up and start investing in fake houseplants, you just need to know which ones are easy to care for. That's why we'll go over which plants are low-maintenance so you don't have to worry about becoming a black thumb.

Take a look!

Peperomia

If you live in a humid area and tried to grow succulents, you know how hard it can be. That's why you might be better off getting a peperomia plant.

Their leaves are waxy which means they'll thrive off of humidity. You can even bring this plant to work as they can survive under fluorescent lights.

Aloe

If you love the look of the trendier plants out there, aloe definitely fits the bill. Its spiky leaves give it an edgy look so they'll be a great addition to any part of the house.

Aloe loves indirect sunlight so you don't have to worry if your place doesn't get an influx of natural light. However, you'll need to soak it once every week and at the least, every two weeks.

And obviously, you can break off the leaves to gather the aloe gel that's great for homemade hand creams.

Air Plant

This plant's name gives a hint to how easy it is to take care of. You don't need to worry about getting soil as it can live without it.

The only thing you'll need to do is give it a good soak every ten days.

Bromeliad

This plant is reminiscent of the top of a pineapple but it comes in multiple colors. It comes in red, purple, and orange varieties.

This plant won't die on you as it'll last a long time. Its favorite temperature to be at is around 70 degrees, making it the perfect houseplant.

And don't worry if you start to see the original stem dying. It'll produce a couple of side shoots that replace the original, kind of like reincarnation.

Dieffenbachia

If you take a second or two to look at this plant, its leaves kind of look like sliced pickles. It has a darker edge with a lighter green color in the middle.

As with the aloe plant, dieffenbachia loves indirect sunlight as well. Doing this will also protect new leaves from dying.

Begonia

For those that want flowers, the begonia plant can fulfil your wish. These blooms are plentiful and look like mini roses. Plus, they come in a variety of colors!

They don't need as much watering in the winter time so you can get a break when that season rolls around. For all other seasons, they only require water every now and then.

Ficus

These plants are great for the house or the office. They like to be in indirect sunlight and misted with water every now and then. They can also help keep the air clear of toxins.

For those wondering about the ficus lyrata, you can read more about that plant here.

Peace Lily

Another plant that filters out toxins from the air, they also make a great alternative to orchids. Peace lilies can grow to be extremely tall, as high as six feet to be exact. So, it's best to know the variety you're getting to ensure your plant won't become taller than you!

Calathea

These plants look like a piece of art. Also known as the peacock plant, their leaves are a mixture of purple and green with large spots.

It's best to keep this plant moist and not to put it in direct sunlight.

Ponytail Palm

This tree looks like it could definitely use a ponytail holder. Its droopy leaves are what gives it a unique look.

Like regular palm trees, they thrive in sunny areas so putting it where direct sunlight hits is a good idea. Just be sure you don't over-water it.

Philodendron

This houseplant looks similar to the monstera leaf, just on a smaller scale. It works best in low light and doesn't require much water at all. In fact, it prefers to be on the dry side.

English Ivy

If you want a plant that'll drape from wherever you place it, this one is it. If you've ever seen Wrigley Field, this is the plant that's covering the walls.

It comes in different varieties but the ones that are best when potted are Domino, Cascade, and Irish Lace.

Crown of Thorns

Part of the succulent family, this plant doesn't like a lot of water. Even if you don't water it often, it'll still produce lovely little pinkish-red blooms year round.

Be warned, though. This plant has thorns and a sap that can cause swelling. It's best to keep it away from children and pets.

Spider Plant

It gets its name because that's exactly what it looks like---spider legs! While this plant looks like it's kind of dead already, it's not.

It loves a well-lit place and wants to be watered at least weekly. It's a plant that keeps on giving as well as it'll produce little plants that you can repot.

Umbrella Tree

While this plant won't protect you from the rain, it does make a great addition to your home or office. It prefers indirect sunlight and survives pretty well when you forget to water it. Just be sure not to over-water it.

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Summer In College Is For More Than Just Working

No, you're never to hold to have fun in the summer.

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There should never be an age where you stop having fun in the summer. The weather is nice, there are always things to do, and everyone is just naturally happier. So, regardless of whether you're 7 or 21, I'm talking to you.

During the year it can be hard to find a routine unless you are a very put together person. Sadly, I am not. Even when I tell myself I'm going to eat healthily, work out, and stop procrastinating, I usually don't follow through with that. At school, I find myself in somewhat of a constant catch-up mode. When I feel like I'm ahead on my homework or studying, that usually means I'm behind on being healthy in other aspects of my life. That is why I love summer. It's a chance to reset the clock for a second and catch your breath.

I get that having an internship or working is important for your post-graduation life, but having fun is important for your college years too. When you get a job in the real world, summer is going to look a lot different for you. That is why it's best to take advantage of the time now. This doesn't mean turning down that work experience, it means doing things other than just working.

First things first is finding a hobby you enjoy that you don't do at school. Pick it up for a little over the summer. Why not? For me, this is yoga. For whatever reason, I find myself too nervous to attend yoga classes at school. I have absolutely no reason to be anxious about doing something I like, but I am so I take the time to attend a few classes a week in the summer.

Secondly, try reading. Before you make that look of disgust on your face, think about the last time you read a book of your choosing. If it was recently, then kudos to you for managing your time well enough to do that. If you are not that person, then hello! I am talking to you. I am not a fan of reading because I usually associate it with homework. However, I find that when I have the time to browse the book section of a store for a few seconds, I find multiple books that jump out at me. During the summer I take the opportunity to read a little here and there. The nice part of leisure reading over school reading is that there's no deadline. You can read what you want when you want to.

Finally, learn something new. Again I usually associate learning with things that I am required to learn for my major. Learning something new that interests you is a different kind of rush. When I'm bored in class, I make bucket lists of little things I want to learn about. They can be big or small. One time I wanted to learn how to knit. Don't ask me why my 19-year-old self thought it would be sweet to sit on my porch in the summer knitting, but I did, and I'm kind of sad I didn't pursue that interest. When might I ever have time to learn how to knit again?

These might sound like quirky things to do, but you're young. Make a bucket list and try to cross one thing off each weekend. If you're like me, then you're a little scared of growing up. Scared you won't be able to accomplish all the things you want to. But, the fact of the matter is no one is going to make you accomplish them but you. So, take some initiative and do them. Summer is for more than just working; it's time to live a little and reset the clock.

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Why Your Toilet Won’t Flush

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Nothing's more frustrated than a toilet that won't flush. When this happens, don't panic.

Instead, take a look at these reasons why your toilet won't flush. Let's get into it!


Chain Length

The chain connected to the flapper is either too short or too long. If it's too long, the flapper can't lift up properly.

If it's too short, the flapper may not be able to close properly, causing your toilet to run constantly. This can be fixed on your own, however, as most chains are adjustable.

Clogged

When a toilet is clogged, the first thing you do is try to unclog it. If it's not working by you manually plumbing it, it's time to contact the professionals.

They'll be able to do a full inspection and a cleaning of the sewage pipes to ensure your toilet goes back to normal.

Damaged Flapper

The flapper is what controls the water flow. When you release the handle, the flapper opens, causing the toilet to flush.

When it's damaged or warped, it can't drain the water properly. To see if it's in some way damaged, open the tank. You'll be able to see from there if it is in some way warped.

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