you'll know you picked the right school when all the "wrong" feelings start to fade

you'll know you picked the right school when all the "wrong" feelings start to fade

The place you were nervous about making into a home for the next four years becomes so much more than that.

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Deciding on your college plans is possibly one of the scariest times in ones young life, especially when you are looking to go far from home. It seems your whole world is applications and ACT scores. You go on countless visits trying to envision yourself finding a new home for four years. Then you stumble on a campus, and everything just feels right.

You see yourself sprinting to class on your first day, or sitting at the campus Chick Fil A with your new friends. This is it. As soon as you leave, the never ending nag of waiting for your acceptance letter sinks in. During that time an uneasy feeling may make its way into your mind as well. Or maybe that feeling comes after your acceptance letter, or right before you move in. That feeling that brings thoughts like am I making the right decision? Should I stay closer to home? Eventually though you shake off the nerves and it's your first day. And those nerves may be back.

College can be overwhelming, especially in the beginning. But before you know it you're in a routine, you're having the time of you're life. Football games, date functions, classes you actually enjoy, it hits a point where you get a new feeling. The feeling that you have heard countless people talk about. The one you spent years thinking, wow I can't wait to be them and have that feeling. The feeling of not being able to imagine yourself at another school.

When you love screaming your lungs out in the football stadium, find your stomach in knots over the last basket in the game, or realizing you hate the rival school more than anything; that's how you know you chose the right school. When you come home for break and people ask you how you like college and a smile immediate comes across your face, that's how you know you chose the right school. When you miss your friends the literal day you leave them, that's how you know you chose the right school.

The place you were nervous about making a home in for the next four years becomes so much more than that. It becomes a place that will be home long after you graduate. It's somewhere you know you'll come back to with all your friends for the homecoming game, somewhere you'll make memories that will bring you smiles for a lifetime. When you take a minute to think, and it hits you that this is the happiest you have ever been in your life. When you've met people you can see being your best friends your whole life. When you walk around campus wondering if life could be any better, that's how you know.

Cover Image Credit:

Emma Moos

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19 Things About Being a Nursing Major As Told By Michael Scott

Michael just gets it.
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If you're a nursing major, you relate to the following 19 things all too well. Between your clinical encounters and constant studying, you can't help but wonder if anyone else outside of your major understands the daily struggles you face in nursing school. And even though being the regional manager of Dunder Mifflin Paper Company, Inc. isn't the same as being a nursing major, Michael Scott does a pretty accurate job of describing what it's like.

1. When your professor overloads your brain with information on the first day of class.

2. Realizing that all your time will now be spent studying in the library.

3. Being jealous of your friends with non-science majors, but then remembering that your job security/availability after graduation makes the stress a little more bearable.

4. Having to accept the harsh reality that your days of making A's on every assignment are now over.

5. When you're asked to share your answer and why you chose it with the whole class.

6. Forgetting one item in a "select all that apply" question, therefore losing all of its points.

7. When you're giving an IV for the first time and your patient jokingly asks, "This isn't your first time giving one of these, right?"

8. You're almost certain that your school's nursing board chose the ugliest scrubs they could find and said, "Let's make these mandatory."

9. Knowing that you have an important exam that you could (should) be studying for, but deciding to watch Netflix instead.

10. Getting to the first day of clinical after weeks of classroom practice.

11. When you become the ultimate mom-friend after learning about the effects various substances have on the human body.

12. Running off of 4-5 hours of sleep has become the new norm for you.

13. And getting just the recommended 7-8 hours makes you feel like a kid on Christmas morning.

14. You have a love-hate relationship with ATI.

15. When your study group says they're meeting on a Saturday.

16. Choosing an answer that's correct, but not the "most" correct, therefore it is wrong.

17. And even though the late nights and stress can feel overwhelming,

18. You wouldn't want any other major because you can't wait to save lives and take care of others.

19. And let's be honest...

Cover Image Credit: YouTube

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It Took Me 4 Years And $100K To Realize Why Poor Kids Like Me Don’t Go To College

But now that I know, I can't get it out of my mind.

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I grew up poor.

There, I said it. It's out in the open now—I don't come from a family that has a bunch of money. In fact, my family doesn't have much money at all. My single mother works in fast food and does a DAMN good job trying to support herself and the rest of us. A lot of the food my family gets comes from food pantries. We have received government assistance before. I grew up poor, but I haven't let that define me.

Especially when it came to going to college.

I didn't want to let my economic background hold me back from my potential. I wanted to be the first person on both sides of my family to receive my college degree. I wanted to get a better paying job and moving up in socioeconomic status so I don't have to be the "poor" girl with the "poor" family all my life. I'm not really ashamed of coming from a poor family, but I also don't want to be poor my entire life.

For a majority of my college career, I wondered why there weren't many poor students around me at college. I go to a public university, and it's just the same price as any other state school really. Coming from a lower income home, I did receive a lot of assistance, and without it, there's no way in hell I could be here. I know that many other lower-income students can get this same assistance, which really made me wonder why there was such a lack of other poor kids around me.

I mean, everyone posts videos from their nice, upper-middle-class homes on Snapchat over holiday breaks while I go back home to the trailer park.

Everyone can call mom or dad and ask for money when things get rough while I pay for 100% of the things I own because my mother simply cannot afford it.

Everyone walks around in their name-brand clothes while I'm rocking Walmart knockoffs. It's not something I thought about for a couple years in college, but once I noticed it, I couldn't think of anything else.

It took me nearly all four years of college to realize why there's such a lack of poor students at my average, public university. Poor students are set up for failure in college. It's almost designed to be a survival of the fittest when it comes to us lower-income students, and those of us who are deemed the fittest and do make it to graduation day are typically stuck with a lot of debt that we don't have the financial intelligence or support to even think about paying off.

Poor students are in the minority in college, and when you're in a minority anywhere, surviving can be difficult. When it costs $100 just for a 5-digit code to do your homework, it can be hard to stay in school. When the cost of living on campus is $10,000 or rent for an apartment is nearly $500 a month, it can be hard to stay in school. When you don't have a car because you can't save up the money for one and your parents can't help you, it can be hard to stay in school. When you're forced to get a minimum wage, on-campus job that limits your to twenty hours a week, it can be hard to stay in school. When all of your friends don't understand why you can't go out to eat or to the bar every weekend, it can be hard to stay in school. All of these reasons add up to the main reason why poor kids don't go to college—the odds are stacked against us.

I never had shame in my socioeconomic status until I went to college. In my hometown, I wasn't much less than the norm. Now, my home life is drastically different than that of all of my friends. I know that this is something that is never going to change because when I enter the workforce in less than a year, I'll be going in as the first member of my family with a college degree. People will treat me differently when I tell them this, even if I don't want them to. People will treat me differently when they ask where my parents work and I tell them McDonald's. It's an unfortunate reality that I cannot control.

It took me nearly all four years to realize why poor kids don't go to college, but now that I know, I can't get it off my mind.

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