Why We Shouldn't Just "Agree To Disagree"

Why We Shouldn't Just "Agree To Disagree"

There actually is a way to discuss politics without resigning your views.
57
views

Oh God, another political article. I’m so burnt out by the last election, I’m just tired of hearing it. Can we just agree to disagree?

No, lay-people, we cannot, and here’s why:

Politics is important. If you don’t care about what happens in your state and federal government, it probably means that you benefit from privilege, which is awesome for you, but I bet you know people that don’t, such as people of color, people in poverty, women, LGBT+ people, immigrants, and on, and on, and on.

If you don’t care to have an opinion, then you are a minority these days. If you don’t have an opinion on social issues (which are the easiest to have), surely you have an opinion on economic policy, tax reform, and education. Chances are if you’re reading this, you spend money, pay taxes, go to school, or sometimes even all three!

We legislate our country through regulations, laws and standards, and because we live in a federal republic, we have an active voice in the decisions that determine what we can and cannot do.

Amazing!

Because we benefit from this type of government, you should take advantage of it, especially if you are part of a group that was not originally given a voice. People died so that the poor, people of color, and women could vote. Don’t let their deaths be in vain.

Okay, so you have opinions, maybe even strong ones, and you run into someone who feels the opposite of you. Thanks to the current political climate, as a society, we have divided our assets by views. I mean, even our Congress separates their chairs according to views. The stalemate way of resigning an argument properly is to simply say “let’s agree to disagree”, which is considered a mature way of ending what could escalate to the well-known argumentative fallacy of getting real personal, real quick.

It's also, by definition, tolerating but not accepting something, which for some, it's hard to tolerate injustice. Now, I’m not saying that we should spend our days on Twitter, arguing with someone with an egg avi and try showing them that they are wrong in 140 characters, but we should understand that you do not have to resign yourself to the fact that people are ignorant.

There’s a pretty simple way to not “agree to disagree” and still politely scream your views from the rooftops, and that is to educate.

In the day of social media politics where no one really knows what’s going on and people use The Onion as a credible source, you need to explain what you believe, why, and back it up with facts and figures that are legitimate. The only rules are that you cannot attack someone personally (an argumentative fallacy in the worst kind of way, and I know we’ve all been there) and you have to believe it for better reasons than “that’s what my parents told/taught me”.

Education is the best way to persuade, and you deserve bonus points if your audience doesn't even realize you're trying to persuade them. The problem with our polarized political climate is not that people are so blind that they refuse to others' points of views (which is a common misconception, but I'm telling you if you look at your senators' and representatives' congressional voting record, that's not necessarily the case), but it's that we cannot agree on a true set of facts.

Defining truth is another article for another week, but until we can agree on real statistics and the truth behind what is going on with "the government," we will get no where in proper debate. Just reference the 2016 election.

Standing up for what you believe in and standing firm in that is patriotic, but it's also patriotic to submit to the social contract and be educated in what you believe in. If we can all let go of our egos and pride long enough to learn something, maybe the next crop of political leaders can manage bi-partisanship, which, let’s be honest, is the only thing that makes the world go around.

Cover Image Credit: Foundation for Economic Education

Popular Right Now

8 Reasons Why My Dad Is the Most Important Man In My Life

Forever my number one guy.
52954
views

Growing up, there's been one consistent man I can always count on, my father. In any aspect of my life, my dad has always been there, showing me unconditional love and respect every day. No matter what, I know that my dad will always be the most important man in my life for many reasons.

1. He has always been there.

Literally. From the day I was born until today, I have never not been able to count on my dad to be there for me, uplift me and be the best dad he can be.

2. He learned to adapt and suffer through girly trends to make me happy.

I'm sure when my dad was younger and pictured his future, he didn't think about the Barbie pretend pageants, dressing up as a princess, perfecting my pigtails and enduring other countless girly events. My dad never turned me down when I wanted to play a game, no matter what and was always willing to help me pick out cute outfits and do my hair before preschool.

3. He sends the cutest texts.

Random text messages since I have gotten my own cell phone have always come my way from my dad. Those randoms "I love you so much" and "I am so proud of you" never fail to make me smile, and I can always count on my dad for an adorable text message when I'm feeling down.

4. He taught me how to be brave.

When I needed to learn how to swim, he threw me in the pool. When I needed to learn how to ride a bike, he went alongside me and made sure I didn't fall too badly. When I needed to learn how to drive, he was there next to me, making sure I didn't crash.

5. He encourages me to best the best I can be.

My dad sees the best in me, no matter how much I fail. He's always there to support me and turn my failures into successes. He can sit on the phone with me for hours, talking future career stuff and listening to me lay out my future plans and goals. He wants the absolute best for me, and no is never an option, he is always willing to do whatever it takes to get me where I need to be.

6. He gets sentimental way too often, but it's cute.

Whether you're sitting down at the kitchen table, reminiscing about your childhood, or that one song comes on that your dad insists you will dance to together on your wedding day, your dad's emotions often come out in the cutest possible way, forever reminding you how loved you are.


7. He supports you, emotionally and financially.

Need to vent about a guy in your life that isn't treating you well? My dad is there. Need some extra cash to help fund spring break? He's there for that, too.

8. He shows me how I should be treated.

Yes, my dad treats me like a princess, and I don't expect every guy I meet to wait on me hand and foot, but I do expect respect, and that's exactly what my dad showed I deserve. From the way he loves, admires, and respects me, he shows me that there are guys out there who will one day come along and treat me like that. My dad always advises me to not put up with less than I deserve and assures me that the right guy will come along one day.

For these reasons and more, my dad will forever be my No. 1 man. I love you!

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Why The Idea Of 'No Politics At The Dinner Table' Takes Place And Why We Should Avoid It

When did having a dialogue become so rare?

421
views

Why has the art of civilized debate and conversation become unheard of in daily life? Why is it considered impolite to talk politics with coworkers and friends? Expressing ideas and discussing different opinions should not be looked down upon.

I have a few ideas as to why this is our current societal norm.

1. Politics is personal.

Your politics can reveal a lot about who you are. Expressing these (sometimes controversial) opinions may put you in a vulnerable position. It is possible for people to draw unfair conclusions from one viewpoint you hold. This fosters a fear of judgment when it comes to our political beliefs.

Regardless of where you lie on the spectrum of political belief, there is a world of assumption that goes along with any opinion. People have a growing concern that others won't hear them out based on one belief.

As if a single opinion could tell you all that you should know about someone. Do your political opinions reflect who you are as a person? Does it reflect your hobbies? Your past?

The question becomes "are your politics indicative enough of who you are as a person to warrant a complete judgment?"

Personally, I do not think you would even scratch the surface of who I am just from knowing my political identification.

2. People are impolite.

The politics themselves are not impolite. But many people who wield passionate, political opinion act impolite and rude when it comes to those who disagree.

The avoidance of this topic among friends, family, acquaintances and just in general, is out of a desire to 'keep the peace'. Many people have friends who disagree with them and even family who disagree with them. We justify our silence out of a desire to avoid unpleasant situations.

I will offer this: It might even be better to argue with the ones you love and care about, because they already know who you are aside from your politics, and they love you unconditionally (or at least I would hope).

We should be having these unpleasant conversations. And you know what? They don't even need to be unpleasant! Shouldn't we be capable of debating in a civilized manner? Can't we find common ground?

I attribute the loss of political conversation in daily life to these factors. 'Keeping the peace' isn't an excuse. We should be discussing our opinions constantly and we should be discussing them with those who think differently.

Instead of discouraging political conversation, we should be encouraging kindness and understanding. That's how we will avoid the unpleasantness that these conversations sometimes bring.

By avoiding them altogether, we are doing our youth a disservice because they are not being exposed to government, law, and politics, and they are not learning to deal with people and ideas that they don't agree with.

Next Thanksgiving, talk politics at the table.

Related Content

Facebook Comments