Why White Guys Generally Don't Go For Black Girls
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Politics and Activism

Why White Guys Generally Don't Go For Black Girls

Thoughts on interracial dating from a Black girl

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Why White Guys Generally Don't Go For Black Girls
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Growing up as a Black girl who had primarily attended private and predominately White institutions, the following question has always been on my mind:

Apart from those who want to satisfy some sort of fetish, why do White guys from upper-middle class suburban areas (generally) not approach Black girls, or girls of color for that matter?

In an earlier article of mine, I discovered why some Black men degrade Black women. That was due to their subconscious belief that Black is not beautiful, intelligent, etc. Now I've moved on to White men and what may be preventing them from approaching Black women.

Research from the dating app OKCupid has even proved that Black women are least desired. That means that, on average, all men go for girls of other races before "settling" for a Black girl. Why is this a thing? Why aren't Black girls desired by anyone -- in this case, by White men?

1. Simply Afraid

David Asenov, a friend of mine and a mechanical engineering student at Florida State University, suggested that perhaps White guys just don't know how to approach Black girls. The difference in cultures might have an influence on this. "Maybe they just don't know what to say," says Asenov, "I don't get it, though, they're just girls." And that's the thing, Black girls are just girls.

2. Lack of Exposure

Young individuals (often White) from suburban, upper-middle-class households are more likely to stay within their communities, more than any other social class. So it's only natural that these individuals only mingle with their own race. Because no one around them and none of their friends date Black girls, these White guys will probably stick with what they're used to and what they understand to be normal.

3. The Effects of Slavery and the Reconstruction Era

I hate to be a broken record, and those of you who attend an HBCU or read my articles have probably heard this a thousand times already, but slavery had and still does have a very strong impact on today's society in America. Perhaps there is a reluctance to date Black girls -- girls who used to be deemed as less than human -- due to the fear of being looked down upon (interracial marriages were illegal, you know).

4. Stereotypes

Similar to the situation in my past article regarding a Black man who ridiculed and hated Black women because of the stereotypes he believed, it is possible that some White men believe the same. In the Reconstruction, Harlem Renaissance, and Civil Rights eras, many stereotypes of Black women arose from the widespread literature that misrepresented them. These stereotypes still exist today.

There are a lot of White guys out there that date Black girls or are married to Black women; that is obvious. Some of you may even be wondering why I decided to touch on this topic and don't believe it to be a real thing, but growing up as a Black girl in an upper-middle-class household -- with tons of beautiful Black girlfriends who are talented and intelligent -- has led me to wonder why Black girls are so undesired.

Look out for future articles of mine regarding this topic, as I will continue find different approaches to the question of why women of color are often least desired by men of all ethnicities.

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This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.

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