Why Can't The Trump Administration Forget About Hillary?

Why Can't The Trump Administration Forget About Hillary?

But those emails, am I right?
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From the very beginning of his ill-fated presidency, Donald Trump has seemed to remind us everyday that he is, in fact, the one sitting in the White House (when he’s not at his golf course) instead of his former rival, Hillary Clinton.

Every chance Trump gets, he continues to criticize Clinton’s past actions and tear her down to make his tiny, microscopic achievements seem worthwhile.

To this very day, Trump is still tweeting about the “crooked Dems and Hillary” who are still apparently plaguing the White House- something that very clearly isn’t true. For the first time in eight years, Republicans are the majority in both Congress and Senate. During the 2016 election, 42 states who had previously voted for Obama flipped to Republican. Despite all of this, the question remains: Why is Trump still so scared of Hillary and the Democratic Party?

While it’s safe to say that almost any Democrat (including myself) will never miss an opportunity to remark that Clinton indeed won the popular vote, for the most part we, as a country, have come to the sad, awful conclusion that Trump will remain in office for a dangerously long time. However, I have noticed in both the media and my everyday life that Republicans continue to be the ones who bring up Hillary whenever Trump seems to do something wrong (a very frequent occurrence).

Yes, the awful events in Benghazi happened and sure, Hillary probably had some pretty confidential emails deleted. But even when Trump is facing similar issues in his own presidency, conservatives still can’t let go of the admitted political failures of a woman. The recent incident in Niger and the probable collusion with Russia are serious, damaging faults brought upon by the Trump administration, so why aren’t they a bigger deal?

Mueller’s indictments of Manafort and Gates have the potential to become a modern Watergate, but of course, Republicans will either defend Trump or remove themselves from the discourse and nothing will ever come of the Trump administration’s crimes. It happened with Charlottesville, it happened with the irrational firing of James Comey, it will be sure to happen again and again. During any given mishap of Trump, there will most definitely be a gaggle of supporters (presumably male and white) behind him who utter those same words over and over: “But, Hillary-“

Way before Trump was even president and the Access Hollywood tapes were released (you know which ones, I don't need to type his disgusting words), people chose to bring up the history of Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky as some kind of twisted defense for the candidate’s words. When it came out that Trump Jr. met with Russians to “get dirt on Clinton,” people were so quick to urge others to “remember the emails!” Interestingly enough, throughout the entire crazy election campaign, people always seemed to bring up the fact that neither candidate was great. I guess to some, choosing between a candidate who actually has decades of political experience and a candidate who is only known for an exploitative reality show and a bankrupt hotel business was just too difficult of a decision.

The actually successful presidency of Obama, with Secretary of State Clinton right by his side, continues to anger Trump supporters. For some reason, it is just preposterous to them to have witnessed an educated black man and a woman intelligently run a sophisticated White House. And now that their beloved Trump is in office, and hasn't done one single thing he promised them, they still blame those who came before Trump for his own failures.

Cover Image Credit: Know Your Meme

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'As A Woman,' I Don't Need To Fit Your Preconceived Political Assumptions About Women

I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

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It is quite possible to say that the United States has never seen such a time of divisiveness, partisanship, and extreme animosity of those on different sides of the political spectrum. Social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are saturated with posts of political opinions and are matched with comments that express not only disagreement but too often, words of hatred. Many who cannot understand others' political beliefs rarely even respect them.

As a female, Republican, college student, I feel I receive the most confusion from others regarding my political opinions. Whenever I post or write something supporting a conservative or expressing my right-leaning beliefs and I see a comment has been left, I almost always know what words their comment will begin with. Or in conversation, if I make my beliefs known and someone begins to respond, I can practically hear the words before they leave their mouth.

"As a woman…"

This initial phrase is often followed by a question, generally surrounding how I could publicly support a Republican candidate or maintain conservative beliefs. "As a woman, how can you support Donald Trump?" or "As a woman, how can you support pro-life policies?" and, my personal favorite, "As a woman, how did you not want Hillary for president?"

Although I understand their sentiment, I cannot respect it. Yes, being a woman is a part of who I am, but it in no way determines who I am. My sex has not and will not adjudicate my goals, my passions, or my work. It will not influence the way in which I think or the way in which I express those thoughts. Further, your mention of my sex as the primary logic for condemning such expressions will not change my adherence to defending what I share. Nor should it.

To conduct your questioning of my politics by inferring that my sex should influence my ideology is not only offensive, it's sexist.

It disregards my other qualifications and renders them worthless. It disregards my work as a student of political science. It disregards my hours of research dedicated to writing about politics. It disregards my creativity as an author and my knowledge of the subjects I choose to discuss. It disregards the fundamental human right I possess to form my own opinion and my Constitutional right to express that opinion freely with others. And most notably, it disregards that I am an individual. An individual capable of forming my own opinions and being brave enough to share those with the world at the risk of receiving backlash and criticism. All I ask is for respect of that bravery and respect for my qualifications.

Words are powerful. They can be used to inspire, unite, and revolutionize. Yet, they can be abused, and too comfortably are. Opening a dialogue of political debate by confining me to my gender restricts the productivity of that debate from the start. Those simple but potent words overlook my identity and label me as a stereotype destined to fit into a mold. They indicate that in our debate, you cannot look past my sex. That you will not be receptive to what I have to say if it doesn't fit into what I should be saying, "as a woman."

That is the issue with politics today. The media and our politicians, those who are meant to encourage and protect democracy, divide us into these stereotypes. We are too often told that because we are female, because we are young adults, because we are a minority, because we are middle-aged males without college degrees, that we are meant to vote and to feel one way, and any other way is misguided. Before a conversation has begun, we are divided against our will. Too many of us fail to inform ourselves of the issues and construct opinions that are entirely our own, unencumbered by what the mainstream tells us we are meant to believe.

We, as a people, have become limited to these classifications. Are we not more than a demographic?

As a student of political science, seeking to enter a workforce dominated by men, yes, I am a woman, but foremost I am a scholar, I am a leader, and I am autonomous. I refuse to be categorized and I refuse to be defined by others. Yes, I am a woman, but I am so much more.

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How Starting Your Journey Is Half Of The Battle

"You can start your journey any day at anytime."

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Not that long ago, I wrote an article about a little phrase I heard on my friend's snapchat story. It got a tone of views and a lot of great feedback. And just in time for the beginning of the new school semester, he said something else that just kind of stuck with me.

He said that you can start your journey any day, at any time.

Okay so we've all heard this before but have any of us actually taken the time to put that saying into action? Well, quite recently I have. I used to be the type of person who waited until last minute to do everything, whether it was homework, a workout plan or whatever I wanted to accomplish. I used to be the type of person who said that at whatever time I'll start my homework and if it was a minute past that time I would have to wait to the start of the new hour....yes like the meme.

But now, ever since I heard that quote, it's been replaying in my head on a loop. Which is why I now just do things at the moment they're thought of and not a certain time. I decided that this is the semester, I don't wait until the last minute to do all of my work, and so far it's going well. I decided that this is the perfect time to get in shape, and not wait until the New Year, because I'm the skinniest most out of shape person that I know. I decided that instead of waiting until the new year to eat healthier that I'm going to do it now.

For a while I have wanted to get back into dance. I kept saying that I'll sign up for classes again when I finish school. But instead I decided to do it now, registered for a ballet class at school and signed up for ballroom dance, and it hands down has been one of the best decisions I have made.

Honestly it's been weird not having a set start date and time for certain things, but why would I put off doing something that I want to do? What I will say though, is that not procrastinating on homework has made these first couple of weeks of the semester fly by and seem like a breeze.

Just by letting go of the idea that every thing needs to have a set start date and time and a set date and time to end has made the pressure of things go away. By just starting my journey for whatever I'm doing right now, has increased my happiness and my overall productivity of what I'm doing.

So a little word of advice just go for and just do whatever you want to do right now.

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