Why Can't The Trump Administration Forget About Hillary?

Why Can't The Trump Administration Forget About Hillary?

But those emails, am I right?

From the very beginning of his ill-fated presidency, Donald Trump has seemed to remind us everyday that he is, in fact, the one sitting in the White House (when he’s not at his golf course) instead of his former rival, Hillary Clinton.

Every chance Trump gets, he continues to criticize Clinton’s past actions and tear her down to make his tiny, microscopic achievements seem worthwhile.

To this very day, Trump is still tweeting about the “crooked Dems and Hillary” who are still apparently plaguing the White House- something that very clearly isn’t true. For the first time in eight years, Republicans are the majority in both Congress and Senate. During the 2016 election, 42 states who had previously voted for Obama flipped to Republican. Despite all of this, the question remains: Why is Trump still so scared of Hillary and the Democratic Party?

While it’s safe to say that almost any Democrat (including myself) will never miss an opportunity to remark that Clinton indeed won the popular vote, for the most part we, as a country, have come to the sad, awful conclusion that Trump will remain in office for a dangerously long time. However, I have noticed in both the media and my everyday life that Republicans continue to be the ones who bring up Hillary whenever Trump seems to do something wrong (a very frequent occurrence).

Yes, the awful events in Benghazi happened and sure, Hillary probably had some pretty confidential emails deleted. But even when Trump is facing similar issues in his own presidency, conservatives still can’t let go of the admitted political failures of a woman. The recent incident in Niger and the probable collusion with Russia are serious, damaging faults brought upon by the Trump administration, so why aren’t they a bigger deal?

Mueller’s indictments of Manafort and Gates have the potential to become a modern Watergate, but of course, Republicans will either defend Trump or remove themselves from the discourse and nothing will ever come of the Trump administration’s crimes. It happened with Charlottesville, it happened with the irrational firing of James Comey, it will be sure to happen again and again. During any given mishap of Trump, there will most definitely be a gaggle of supporters (presumably male and white) behind him who utter those same words over and over: “But, Hillary-“

Way before Trump was even president and the Access Hollywood tapes were released (you know which ones, I don't need to type his disgusting words), people chose to bring up the history of Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky as some kind of twisted defense for the candidate’s words. When it came out that Trump Jr. met with Russians to “get dirt on Clinton,” people were so quick to urge others to “remember the emails!” Interestingly enough, throughout the entire crazy election campaign, people always seemed to bring up the fact that neither candidate was great. I guess to some, choosing between a candidate who actually has decades of political experience and a candidate who is only known for an exploitative reality show and a bankrupt hotel business was just too difficult of a decision.

The actually successful presidency of Obama, with Secretary of State Clinton right by his side, continues to anger Trump supporters. For some reason, it is just preposterous to them to have witnessed an educated black man and a woman intelligently run a sophisticated White House. And now that their beloved Trump is in office, and hasn't done one single thing he promised them, they still blame those who came before Trump for his own failures.

Cover Image Credit: Know Your Meme

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Millennials Should Not Be Ignored

Our generation is speaking out, and people need to listen.

In today's society, millennials are often being ignored. We are characterized as "too young" or "too naive". But has anyone ever stopped and thought about how we as millennials may actually have more knowledge on today's issues?

Think about it: the majority of us get a quality education, most at least have a high school diploma or GED. Speaking from personal experience, I know that education is getting more and more complex as the years go on: My parents stopped being able to help me with math and science when I turned 10, and they both have college degrees. Our young minds are being exposed to so much more than other people have ever had the opportunity to access before.

We are also the generation who has been completely submerged in technology. Most of us don't remember a life without a computer, cell phone, or the internet. Generations before us haven't had the opportunity to completely live in a world full of technology and all it has to offer, and that gives us a huge advantage.

We understand how technology works and how useful it can be, as we don't know life any other way. For the first time, we are able to find out information about anything at literally any moment. We are able to connect with people all over the world and find out news the second it happens. Ignoring our knowledge of such a useful resource is not only stupid, but also damaging to everyone's futures.

Something I find completely ridiculous about generations before us is how ignorant they are of millennials, and the experience that we have with all of these current issues in our society.

So, let's talk about gun control.

Now everyone is entitled to their own opinions about gun control and what kinds of regulations we should have, but was I find baffling is how inconsiderate the government, the NRA, and older generations are being towards millennials. WE are the one's who have to watch our friends and peers be shot and killed. WE are the one's who have to practice 'shooter drills' in our schools now because of how normal shootings are becoming.

WE are the one's that are face to face with this reality of school shootings way too often. And what I don't understand is how the government and NRA have the audacity to say that we as students are uninformed, or naive, etc. We are the only one's who completely understand this issue. Honestly, I shouldn't even be including myself, because I have been fortunate enough to not have to experience such a tragedy within my lifetime. But I stand with those who have, as I am a millennial who's opinion is being ignored, and it needs to stop.

We need to be heard.

Our voices are stronger than ever before.

And we demand change.

But shifting off the topic of gun control, our opinion matters no matter what the issue. We are living in a period of activism, and millennials are the head of it. We want change, not just because activism is "trendy" or "current", but because we want to change the world that we are going to live in and that our children will grow up in.

We don't want to fear about school shootings, climate change, pollution, etc in our lifetimes, much less in our children's lifetimes. The generations before us have destroyed our world, and Millennials all over the world are trying to fix it. We are reshaping our world so that we will enjoy living in it.

So, To Whoever It May Concern,

Please do not ignore us. We are a lot more powerful than you think. I, and millennials around me, want to fix this world so that it doesn't crash and burn, but rather becomes better than it's ever been before. Don't ignore our opinions because we are younger, or don't quite have our degrees. We are more powerful than this world thinks.

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The 'Blue Wave:' Contender or Pretender?

Democrats and the media claim of a rising "blue wave" in response to the Trump Administration; is this a fallacy or something to watch out for?

On January 20, 2017, Donald Trump was named President of the United States, and parts of the country seemed to honestly go up in flames. Ever since, critics in the media have been rampant and insanely fastidious on what he does right and wrong. Overall, this coverage and the overall feeling about the President seem to be pretty negative. In reaction to this, political scientists and politicians have been monitoring and predicting a “blue wave.” So what exactly is blue wave? Is it even important or just a speculation?

In 2017, it became a real shock to many people that a Democratic Senator was elected to Congress—Doug Jones, whose opponent Roy Moore was accused of sexual assault with a minor and upon losing, took forever to officially concede. Now, in the eyes of the Senate, Alabama was no longer that reliably deep red state; it was split half-and-half.

In early 2018, about a week or so ago, it was considered a huge win for Democrat Linda Belcher in defeating opponent Rebecca Johnson in a special election in Bullitt County, Kentucky. Also, back home, there have recently been other elections recently in which Democrats did not win, but became narrowly close to winning. So what? So what: these counties in which Democrats have been making ground were runaways for President Trump in 2016.

In both of these states, Trump won by a large margin, as both states are considered safe red states. But now, there seems to be a little bit of uncertainty in each about political ground and where exactly the state stands. This is where the theory of a blue wave comes in. With lower polling numbers reflecting popularity of President Trump and other members in Congress of the Republican Party, the thought is that more and more moderates or people fed up with the Republican Party and President Trump are going to start voting for people of the Democratic Party. This theory sounds great in all, as do a lot of things on paper. But it is important to do further digging and examination of this, especially if it is going to be a pivoting line for Democrats to use in hopes of being voted in.

First of all, before even looking at specific cases of Alabama and Kentucky, think about the very theory behind such a phrase. Sure, political parties are pretty polarized as it is and seem to be doing nothing except continuing that process. But the very notion of a blue wave comes from people only needing to see the “-D” next to a name on a ballot. It requires no further education of a candidate and alienates the other side just because they are associated with that side. If you’re looking to really seek revenge on that side or you have the thought that every person in one party really is the same as the leading cronies of it, I suppose that makes sense. But a lot of times, members are different from their overall party and the representation at the top. Civic engagement is also incredibly important to keep up with; glancing at a name and their affiliation can lead to some serious problems. If all Republicans all thought and agreed on the same things, Independents would probably no longer be an exception but rather be seriously involved in the fight for office. Not to mention, if all Republicans are the same, then why are there so many inner-party conflicts between different branches of conservatism as well as with the President? Not all Democrats agree on the same things and preach the same things. Politicians are still people with different thoughts and ideas; alienating them to a simple phrase or one theory can prove to be really reckless.

Now, with personal examination towards the cases of Alabama and Kentucky: Let’s start with Alabama. When the news escaped that a potential sexual assailant was running for office, it became national news and caught the attention of millions of people. Even then, Moore still had a shot at winning the seat. When the final numbers came out, the amount of people who refused to vote Democrat but refused to vote for Moore was right around the magic number that would have given Moore the race. It was not the fury of citizens in Alabama from the Trump presidency or how fed up they were with Republicans that gave Dems this win—It was the fact that Doug Jones is not Roy Moore.

In Kentucky, it made news in other states as well that a Democrat won a district that Trump initially ran away with. It seems odd hearing that Democrats are being elected in good old Kentucky where the state has, historically, almost always leaned on the side of conservatism. However, Linda Belcher, winner of that district, previously had the seat and won it back. She was not a newcomer of which people did not already know her and did not have any groundbreaking methods or stances of getting into office.

Trust me: as a registered Democrat, I think it is wonderful that other Democrats are getting elected into office, especially since the majority represent values that I strongly agree with. However, I think that it may make more sense to say that this happens with incidence and time and place rather than with a sweeping movement. I may prove to be wrong in the future, but with these early results, it doesn’t appear like there is this huge anti-Trump movement in the country. Constituents are going to look at their personal representatives and decide based on their stances and what work they have done to help at home rather than if they are a certain party or not. Sure, some people do look for “-R” or other indicators of someone in a party and decide that way. However, for a good amount of people that do vote and care to get out the vote, many of them are at least willing to listen to what a candidate opposing their party has to say.

Cover Image Credit: Lorie Shaull, Wikimedia

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