Why Can't The Trump Administration Forget About Hillary?

Why Can't The Trump Administration Forget About Hillary?

But those emails, am I right?
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From the very beginning of his ill-fated presidency, Donald Trump has seemed to remind us everyday that he is, in fact, the one sitting in the White House (when he’s not at his golf course) instead of his former rival, Hillary Clinton.

Every chance Trump gets, he continues to criticize Clinton’s past actions and tear her down to make his tiny, microscopic achievements seem worthwhile.

To this very day, Trump is still tweeting about the “crooked Dems and Hillary” who are still apparently plaguing the White House- something that very clearly isn’t true. For the first time in eight years, Republicans are the majority in both Congress and Senate. During the 2016 election, 42 states who had previously voted for Obama flipped to Republican. Despite all of this, the question remains: Why is Trump still so scared of Hillary and the Democratic Party?

While it’s safe to say that almost any Democrat (including myself) will never miss an opportunity to remark that Clinton indeed won the popular vote, for the most part we, as a country, have come to the sad, awful conclusion that Trump will remain in office for a dangerously long time. However, I have noticed in both the media and my everyday life that Republicans continue to be the ones who bring up Hillary whenever Trump seems to do something wrong (a very frequent occurrence).

Yes, the awful events in Benghazi happened and sure, Hillary probably had some pretty confidential emails deleted. But even when Trump is facing similar issues in his own presidency, conservatives still can’t let go of the admitted political failures of a woman. The recent incident in Niger and the probable collusion with Russia are serious, damaging faults brought upon by the Trump administration, so why aren’t they a bigger deal?

Mueller’s indictments of Manafort and Gates have the potential to become a modern Watergate, but of course, Republicans will either defend Trump or remove themselves from the discourse and nothing will ever come of the Trump administration’s crimes. It happened with Charlottesville, it happened with the irrational firing of James Comey, it will be sure to happen again and again. During any given mishap of Trump, there will most definitely be a gaggle of supporters (presumably male and white) behind him who utter those same words over and over: “But, Hillary-“

Way before Trump was even president and the Access Hollywood tapes were released (you know which ones, I don't need to type his disgusting words), people chose to bring up the history of Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky as some kind of twisted defense for the candidate’s words. When it came out that Trump Jr. met with Russians to “get dirt on Clinton,” people were so quick to urge others to “remember the emails!” Interestingly enough, throughout the entire crazy election campaign, people always seemed to bring up the fact that neither candidate was great. I guess to some, choosing between a candidate who actually has decades of political experience and a candidate who is only known for an exploitative reality show and a bankrupt hotel business was just too difficult of a decision.

The actually successful presidency of Obama, with Secretary of State Clinton right by his side, continues to anger Trump supporters. For some reason, it is just preposterous to them to have witnessed an educated black man and a woman intelligently run a sophisticated White House. And now that their beloved Trump is in office, and hasn't done one single thing he promised them, they still blame those who came before Trump for his own failures.

Cover Image Credit: Know Your Meme

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An Open Letter To Democrats From A Millennial Republican

Why being a Republican doesn't mean I'm inhuman.
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Dear Democrats,

I have a few things to say to you — all of you.

You probably don't know me. But you think you do. Because I am a Republican.

Gasp. Shock. Horror. The usual. I know it all. I hear it every time I come out of the conservative closet here at my liberal arts university.

SEE ALSO: What I Mean When I Say I'm A Young Republican

“You're a Republican?" people ask, saying the word in the same tone that Draco Malfoy says “Mudblood."

I know that not all Democrats feel about Republicans this way. Honestly, I can't even say for certain that most of them do. But in my experience, saying you're a Republican on a liberal college campus has the same effect as telling someone you're a child molester.

You see, in this day and age, with leaders of the Republican Party standing up and spouting unfortunately ridiculous phrases like “build a wall," and standing next to Kim Davis in Kentucky after her release, we Republicans are given an extreme stereotype. If you're a Republican, you're a bigot. You don't believe in marriage equality. You don't believe in racial equality. You don't believe in a woman's right to choose. You're extremely religious and want to impose it on everyone else.

Unfortunately, stereotypes are rooted in truth. There are some people out there who really do think these things and feel this way. And it makes me mad. The far right is so far right that they make the rest of us look bad. They make sure we aren't heard. Plenty of us are fed up with their theatrics and extremism.

For those of us brave enough to wear the title “Republican" in this day and age, as millennials, it's different. Many of us don't agree with these brash ideas. I'd even go as far as to say that most of us don't feel this way.

For me personally, being a Republican doesn't even mean that I automatically vote red.

When people ask me to describe my political views, I usually put it pretty simply. “Conservative, but with liberal social views."

“Oh," they say, “so you're a libertarian."

“Sure," I say. But that's the thing. I'm not really a libertarian.

Here's what I believe:

I believe in marriage equality. I believe in feminism. I believe in racial equality. I don't want to defund Planned Parenthood. I believe in birth control. I believe in a woman's right to choose. I believe in welfare. I believe more funds should be allocated to the public school system.

Then what's the problem? Obviously, I'm a Democrat then, right?

Wrong. Because I have other beliefs too.

Yes, I believe in the right to choose — but I'd always hope that unless a pregnancy would result in the bodily harm of the woman, that she would choose life. I believe in welfare, but I also believe that our current system is broken — there are people who don't need it receiving it, and others who need it that cannot access it.

I believe in capitalism. I believe in the right to keep and bear arms, because I believe we have a people crisis on our hands, not a gun crisis. Contrary to popular opinion, I do believe in science. I don't believe in charter schools. I believe in privatizing as many things as possible. I don't believe in Obamacare.

Obviously, there are other topics on the table. But, generally speaking, these are the types of things we millennial Republicans get flack for. And while it is OK to disagree on political beliefs, and even healthy, it is NOT OK to make snap judgments about me as a person. Identifying as a Republican does not mean I am the same as Donald Trump.

Just because I am a Republican, does not mean you know everything about me. That does not give you the right to make assumptions about who I am as a person. It is not OK for you to group me with my stereotype or condemn me for what I feel and believe. And for a party that prides itself on being so open-minded, it shocks me that many of you would be so judgmental.

So I ask you to please, please, please reexamine how you view Republicans. Chances are, you're missing some extremely important details. If you only hang out with people who belong to your own party, chances are you're missing out on great people. Because, despite what everyone believes, we are not our stereotype.

Sincerely,

A millennial Republican

Cover Image Credit: NEWSWORK.ORG

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2020 Democrats Need To Stick Together If They Don't Want A Repeat Of 2016

Democrats have to be willing to swallow their pride if they want the executive branch to turn blue.

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With a sufficient amount of democratic hopefuls, one of the largest problems in the party is actually choosing one. In the 2016 election, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton were two household names that circled about. However, even after it became statistically improbably for Sanders to win the Democratic primary, he did not back down. He continued to campaign, which led to divisions in the party and might have been the reason to why the Democrats lost the election. Obviously, we have to learn from the past with the upcoming 2020 election.

Parties do better when they stick together.

When there is a division within the party, the votes get divided ultimately giving the win to the competing party. In the 2016 election, Democrats were strongly divided to a point that they were willing to vote for the Republican candidate rather than the other Democratic candidate (which did happen). Some Sanders supporters were unwilling to vote for Clinton just because it was her. They ended up voting for Trump since he wasn't Hillary. We know how that all worked out.

Democrats have to stick together and not become a hindrance to each other.

Although the candidate you were rooting for didn't win the primaries, they still share more ideals than the opposing party does. Elections are becoming more candidate-centric than party-centric which is quite concerning. Candidates have personal interests in mind and could change them on a whim. Parties have an established party platform that does change but only changes every four years.

Democrats don't want to relive what happened in the 2016 elections again.

With the high number of candidates running for the Democratic ballot, the fear of 2016 occurring again is high. Many of the candidates are extremely qualified and have dedicated voters that might put the candidate before the party. Democrats have to be willing to swallow their pride if they want the executive branch to turn blue.

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