Once you've taken organic chemistry, you can never go back. Before you know it, you're thinking like an organic chemist and seeing the world as an organic chemist. Literally, everything reminds you of orgo. If you've taken the fateful class, here are some things you may know to be true

1. When you see the Budweiser logo, you automatically think of the chair confirmation of cyclohexane.

https://www.budweiser.com/en/budweiser-recipes/bud-and-burgers/classic-american-burger.html

If you haven't noticed it before, now you can't un-see it. I'm sorry.

2. Every time you see a shape, you see a cyclic molecule.

That square shaped sidewalk? Cyclobutane. That triangle shaped artwork? Cyclopropane. Stop sign? Cyclooctane. Even a line reminds you of a methyl substituent.

3. Stick figures look like molecules, not people.

Memes don't get more relatable than this.

pinterest.com

You know you've taken organic chemistry if you've ever looked at a stick figure and said "hmm... that structure doesn't seem possible," and then realized that it was a stick figure, not a molecule.

4. When people ask if you're bilingual, you instinctively say yes.

IUPAC counts as a second language, right? If you can do correctly utilize their nomenclature, congratulations. You know the "language" of organic chemistry.

5. Looking at Charlie Brown's shirt (or any chevron) makes you think of a long alkyl chain.

Who knew Charlie Brown was so into organic chemistry?

https://www.peanuts.com/characters/

If you look at Charlie Brown and instinctively think CH3(CH2)nCH3, then you know you've been an organic chem student before.

6. Your first definition of "aromatic" isn't "having a pleasant smell."

When you hear "aromatic" you instinctively think of a conjugated, planar, and cyclic molecule that follows Huckle's rule, like benzene. People who haven't experienced the wonders of organic just think of something that smells nice.

7. To you, acid is a reagent that donates a proton, usually used as a catalyst for organic reactions... not a drug.

If you walk up to a chemist and a nonchemist separately and said "I used acid today," to both of them, you'll likely get two very different responses. (Pro tip: always be sure to follow up that sentence with "in my reaction.")

8. If you've ever looked at the ingredients in something and smirked because you know the structure of one if them, you've probably taken organic chemistry.

The structure of glucose in its chair confirmation... not to be confused with the Budweiser logo.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose

Whether its hand lotion, a popsicle, face wash, or candy, check out the ingredients.... you're bound to recognize something.

9. The word "alcohol" to you means a molecule with an OH substituent.

When you hear people talking about drinking alcohol, you think to yourself "it's actually ethanol..." An alcohol can be so many things to an organic chemist, but for non chemists, it's simply something utilized to have a good time.