Unconstitutional Or Not: What You Need To Know About Trump's Travel Ban

Unconstitutional Or Not: What You Need To Know About Trump's Travel Ban

Will the Supreme Court agree that the travel (aka immigration) ban is unconstitutional?
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On Jan. 27, President Trump issued the infamous immigration/travel ban — aka, an executive order "protecting the nation from foreign terrorist entry into the United States." But do you know who this order really affects? Or why was it shot down as "unconstitutional" three times in a row? And do you think it'll stand in the Supreme Court now, considering who's in there...?

So who did the immigration/travel ban effect?

Well according to the White House executive order:

"In order to protect Americans, the United States must ensure that those admittedu to this country do not bear hostile attitudes toward it and its founding principles."

Sounds alright, except that wish coincides with this faulty mindset:

“We’ve had dozens and dozens of terrorism cases from these seven countries, case after case after case,” said senior White House adviser Stephen Miller.

Which is simply not true, because the travel ban affects Syria, Iraq, Iran, Libya, Sudan, Yemen and Somalia — seven countries with refugees who CNN states have no record of having "killed anyone in terrorist attacks on American soil." Furthermore, those being banned include visitors, students, workers on temporary visas, new immigrants issued visas (green cards) based on employee or family status and most notably, refugees — indefinitely barring Syrian refugees in particular.

But why is it considered unconstitutional?

It's been speculated that the nations listed are being targeted because they are predominately Muslim. Yet some argued that not all Muslim countries were banned, especially not countries where a vast majority of Muslims live like Saudi Arabia despite it being the center of Islamic religious activity, so there must be a reasonable explanation for all this. And of course, there is.

The countries that made the cut are nations President Trump maintains business ties with, and as any clever businessman knows, it's best to stay on your connections' good side.

This temporary ban also suspended "entry of all refugees — those who want to resettle in the United States — for 120 days and barred refugees from Syria indefinitely." However, the ban was as more temporary than expected, because within a week after it was issued, federal Judge James Robart in Seattle temporarily lifted the ban nationwide.

A three-judge federal appeals panel met soon after on Feb. 9 and came to the unanimous decision to reject reinstatement of the travel ban. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld this decision, supported by technology giants like Apple, Google, Microsoft and 94 other companies by filing the legal brief opposing the ban due to its predicted harmful effect on American businesses. So far, the ban has been ruled unconstitutional.

Trump fired back right away, finally bringing this questionable executive order under the scrutiny of the Supreme Court.

And if you think Trump sounds cocky for a president who just got shot down thrice yet still insists he's right, well, he's got a reason for that, too. On Jan. 31, the president nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch as a Supreme Court justice, a solid conservative who is expected to break the possible 4-4 tie regarding the case if his nomination is accepted. But when asked for his opinion regarding the ban during the second day of the Senate Judiciary Committee's confirmation hearing, Gorsuch said he felt it would be "grossly improper of a judge to do that," so nothing confirms if he'll vote in favor of Trump or not. Still, if there's one positive note to end this on, it's that at least this nominee has enough sense to handle himself with dignity and just enough humor to get by.

Cover Image Credit: Ethics Alarms

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Your Wait time At Theme Parks Is Not Unfair, You're Just Impatient

Your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself.

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Toy Story Land at Disney's Hollywood Studios "unboxed" on June 30, 2018. My friend and I decided to brave the crowds on opening day. We got to the park around 7 AM only to find out that the park opened around 6 AM. Upon some more scrolling through multiple Disney Annual Passholder Facebook groups, we discovered that people were waiting outside the park as early as 1 AM.

We knew we'd be waiting in line for the bulk of the Toy Story Land unboxing day. There were four main lines in the new land: the line to enter the land; the line for Slinky Dog Dash, the new roller coaster; the line for Alien Spinning Saucers, the easier of the new rides in the land; Toy Story Mania, the (now old news) arcade-type ride; and the new quick-service restaurant, Woody's Lunchbox (complete with grilled cheese and "grown-up drinks").

Because we were so early, we did not have to wait in line to get into the land. We decided to ride Alien Spinning Saucers first. The posted wait time was 150 minutes, but my friend timed the line and we only waited for 50 minutes. Next, we tried to find the line for Slinky Dog Dash. After receiving conflicting answers, the runaround, and even an, "I don't know, good luck," from multiple Cast Members, we exited the land to find the beginning of the Slinky line. We were then told that there was only one line to enter the park that eventually broke off into the Slinky line. We were not about to wait to get back into the area we just left, so we got a Fastpass for Toy Story Mania that we didn't plan on using in order to be let into the land sooner. We still had to wait for our time, so we decided to get the exclusive Little Green Man alien popcorn bin—this took an entire hour. We then used our Fastpass to enter the land, found the Slinky line, and proceeded to wait for two and a half hours only for the ride to shut down due to rain. But we've come this far and rain was not about to stop us. We waited an hour, still in line and under a covered area, for the rain to stop. Then, we waited another hour and a half to get on the ride from there once it reopened (mainly because they prioritized people who missed their Fastpass time due to the rain). After that, we used the mobile order feature on the My Disney Experience app to skip part of the line at Woody's Lunchbox.

Did you know that there is actually a psychological science to waiting? In the hospitality industry, this science is the difference between "perceived wait" and "actual wait." A perceived wait is how long you feel like you are waiting, while the actual wait is, of course, the real and factual time you wait. There are eight things that affect the perceived wait time: unoccupied time feels longer than occupied time, pre-process waits feel longer than in-process waits, anxiety makes waits feel longer, uncertain waits are longer than certain waits, unexplained waits are longer than explained waits, unfair waits are longer than equitable waits, people will wait longer for more valuable service and solo waiting feels longer than group waiting.

Our perceived wait time for Alien Spinning Saucers was short because we expected it to be longer. Our wait for the popcorn seemed longer because it was unoccupied and unexplained. Our wait for the rain to stop so the ride could reopen seemed shorter because it was explained. Our wait between the ride reopening and getting on the coaster seemed longer because it felt unfair for Disney to let so many Fastpass holders through while more people waited through the rain. Our entire wait for Slinky Dog Dash seemed longer because we were not told the wait time in the beginning. Our wait for our food after placing a mobile order seemed shorter because it was an in-process wait. We also didn't mind wait long wait times for any of these experiences because they were new and we placed more value on them than other rides or restaurants at Disney. The people who arrived at 1 AM just added five hours to their perceived wait

Some non-theme park examples of this science of waiting in the hospitality industry would be waiting at a restaurant, movie theater, hotel, performance or even grocery store. When I went to see "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom," the power went out in the theater right as we arrived. Not only did we have to wait for it to come back and for them to reset the projectors, I had to wait in a bit of anxiety because the power outage spooked me. It was only a 30-minute wait but felt so much longer. At the quick-service restaurant where I work, we track the time from when the guest places their order to the time they receive their food. Guests in the drive-thru will complain about 10 or more minute waits, when our screens tell us they have only been waiting four or five minutes. Their actual wait was the four or five minutes that we track because this is when they first request our service, but their perceived wait begins the moment they pull into the parking lot and join the line because this is when they begin interacting with our business. While in line, they are experiencing pre-process wait times; after placing the order, they experience in-process wait times.

Establishments in the hospitality industry do what they can to cut down on guests' wait times. For example, theme parks offer services like Disney's Fastpass or Universal's Express pass in order to cut down the time waiting in lines so guests have more time to buy food and merchandise. Stores like Target or Wal-Mart offer self-checkout to give guests that in-process wait time. Movie theaters allow you to check in and get tickets on a mobile app and some quick-service restaurants let you place mobile or online orders. So why do people still get so bent out of shape about being forced to wait?

On Toy Story Land unboxing day, I witnessed a woman make a small scene about being forced to wait to exit the new land. Cast Members were regulating the flow of traffic in and out of the land due to the large crowd and the line that was in place to enter the land. Those exiting the land needed to wait while those entering moved forward from the line. Looking from the outside of the situation as I was, this all makes sense. However, the woman I saw may have felt that her wait was unfair or unexplained. She switched between her hands on her hips and her arms crossed, communicated with her body language that she was not happy. Her face was in a nasty scowl at those entering the land and the Cast Members in the area. She kept shaking her head at those in her group and when allowed to proceed out of the land, I could tell she was making snide comments about the wait.

At work, we sometimes run a double drive-thru in which team members with iPads will take orders outside and a sequencer will direct cars so that they stay in the correct order moving toward the window. In my experience as the sequencer, I will inform the drivers which car to follow, they will acknowledge me and then still proceed to dart in front of other cars just so they make it to the window maybe a whole minute sooner. Not only is this rude, but it puts this car and the cars around them at risk of receiving the wrong food because they are now out of order. We catch these instances more often than not, but it still adds stress and makes the other guests upset. Perhaps these guests feel like their wait is also unfair or unexplained, but if they look at the situation from the outside or from the restaurant's perspective, they would understand why they need to follow the blue Toyota.

The truth of the matter is that your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself. We all want instant gratification, I get it. But in reality, we have to wait for some things. It takes time to prepare a meal. It takes time to experience a ride at a theme park that everyone else wants to go on. It takes time to ring up groceries. It takes patience to live in this world.

So next time you find yourself waiting, take a minute to remember the difference between perceived and actual wait times. Think about the eight aspects of waiting that affect your perceived wait. Do what you can to realize why you are waiting or keep yourself occupied in this wait. Don't be impatient. That's no way to live your life.

Cover Image Credit:

Aranxa Esteve

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My Liberal Women's Studies Class Made Me Hate Modern-Day Feminism

I disagreed with it before, but now I can barely support it.

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The first time I got to take women and gender studies was my senior year of high school. My teacher was incredible, and I feel that once everyone (yes including me) could get past our political differences, we all learned so much from each other. We didn't agree with each other the majority of the time, but we all took the time to understand why we felt the way that we do.

In college, I was isolated by my own professor and I was taught her opinion and was expected to take it as a fact. It was anti-Republican and politically charged. Anyone who has taken a women's studies course in college I've spoken to agrees, the course is only so much fact and history, it's most discussion and opinion.

I dropped that class, it was not what I knew it could be. I recently enrolled in the same class online. Relearning the foundation of what the feminist movement is, and what it stood for only renewed my disagreement with modern feminism.

For those of you unfamiliar with feminism, it is categorized into three waves. To keep it short and sweet, first wave feminism consists of the women who worked to gain the right to vote and other legal aspects.

Second wave feminism took place in the 1960's and 70's and to my knowledge, seemed to focus on a lot of workplace rights, education rights and such.

Third wave feminism started in the 1990s and is considered modern-day feminism.

Feminism is the desire to have equality among the sexes.

My grandmother once said that she didn't know what these women were so upset about. They don't know and have never seen real and true oppression. She has a point. Women in America have it good compared to women even 50 years ago and certainly have it better than women in most other countries. We get to drive, have credit cards, our own bank accounts, have a job, own a company, run for office, and live on our own. Women are allowed to be pro-choice or be pro-life, carry a gun or not carry a gun. This is all because of the women who came before us and helped us get here.

So many modern feminists believe that men are the reason they face oppression and that men cannot represent them. That isn't equality. That is shutting down an entire group of people, saying they cannot adequately do their job simply because they are a man. Which is exactly what feminists are supposed to be against when that is applied to women. Also, if they don't like their elected representatives, go out and exercise your right to vote, work on campaigns you do agree with, or even try to speak with your elected officials.

Most people also associate modern feminism with being a liberal. There is an obvious exclusion of conservative women from the feminist movement.

If you are pro-life you can't be a feminist.

If you voted for Donald Trump you can't be a feminist.

If you are a conservative with conservative values you can't be a feminist.

This is not what the feminist movement is supposed to be about.

Let us go straight to a hot topic as an example: abortion. The Supreme Court has the final say, and they set precedent. In other words, any law that would change any outcome of Roe V. Wade is unconstitutional unless the Supreme Court itself takes on a case and makes the changes itself. So no, Donald Trump cannot take away your right to an abortion. That is just a politically charged line to get people fired up.

Also, conservative values include minimal government, therefore many conservatives feel that it's not the government's place to tell you what to do with your body. Being personally pro-life doesn't mean we believe that you shouldn't have a say in if you get an abortion.

A lot of women are NRA members and have a concealed carry permit so they can protect themselves, their children, etc. Maybe they recently got out of a domestic violence situation, or have been harassed by an ex. If you are lucky enough, you can get a piece of paper that gives you some form of legal protection, but a law or a rule won't stop a criminal.

Why do women who claim to be feminists tear down or shame other women because of political differences?

I know I will never hate another woman based on her political party. I didn't want Hilary Clinton to win because I didn't agree with any of her policies, not based on political parties and not because I thought a man is supposed to be in charge. I think it's awesome I got to see two women be candidates in this past presidential election.

We live in a society where we are considered equal to men. Is it perfect? No. But the most important right previous movements gave us, is the right to an opinion and to seek justice. Women have access to birth control just like men, in fact, women have more birth control options than men. Women can speak out and seek justice and protection from violent relationships, and so can men. It is also true men face more stigmas than women when it comes to domestic/dating violence and sexual assault. Men are expected to be the ones who are the aggressors, not the abused or assaulted. Nobody talks about that fact.

I'll leave you with this: if it is so bad here, then why do so many people aspire to start a life here? We are the land of the free. We are not perfect, but we are the closest to perfect here than anywhere else.

Cover Image Credit:

Pexels

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