I Thought I Settled When I Decided On A College, But Now I Can't Imagine Myself Anywhere Else

I Thought I Settled When I Decided On A College, But Now I Can't Imagine Myself Anywhere Else

It was never clear to me which college I would go to, until I couldn't go to one of them.
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The most terrifying part of anyone's high school career is undoubtedly deciding what to do after graduation. Whether you're deciding between working or going to trade school or choosing which college to go to, it's no secret that the decision will be a tough one to make.

I spent the majority of my senior year waiting on acceptance letters and deciding between the top two schools of my choice: Clemson University and College of Charleston. I made a billion pro-con lists and spent countless hours lying awake at night trying to decide where I'd be happiest, but the choice was never blatant.

Around Christmas, my friends started getting acceptance letters and announcing their decisions to their friends and families while receiving a slew of congratulatory messages in return. I, on the other hand, was faced with the same question every single day: "Do you know where you're going to school yet?"

The question constantly loomed over me and followed me wherever I went. It wasn't until February 11 when I received a letter from Clemson University admitting me into their bridge program that I began to lean towards College of Charleston, and I was crushed. I was so involved in high school. I helped found two organizations and was president of both at some point. I played a sport and my GPA was very high. I was devastated and offended that I was offered anything less than full admission.

So, I made my decision.

I accepted admission to College of Charleston as a member of a prestigious scholarship program that I was not very excited for at all. I made the obligatory Facebook post announcing my decision and immediately received hundreds of messages from friends and family with their words of encouragement and sweet congratulations. I smiled and said that I was so excited to go to school in such an amazing city and learn at such a wonderful institution, but I had no idea that I would eventually believe those words.

I graduated on May 31 and spent my entire summer preparing myself for change. I moved into my first dorm at College of Charleston on August 16 and within a week I was questioning how I could ever wish to be somewhere else.

The day after I moved in, I went to a retreat on Seabrook Island for incoming freshmen to learn about College of Charleston and on August 21 I watched the total solar eclipse from Charleston's famous Marion Square.

I have spent countless nights at Waterfront Park looking at the lights of the Cooper River Bridge and the USS Yorktown. I have volunteered at the largest young adult literature festival in the country, YALLFest, on Upper King St where I met some of my favorite authors of all time. I have grown to love the scholarship program that I thought I would dread.

I have made friends who stick by my side at all times. I have moved in with people I love. I have joined a sisterhood that I never would've imagined myself in before my life in Charleston. I have started to love a city that I never really imagined myself in before my senior year of high school.

Although College of Charleston was not always my clear first choice, I could not imagine being anywhere else right now. The experiences I've had are irreplaceable and there is no other city in the world like Charleston. My life has truly all fallen into place here, and I'm thankful for every step that led me to The College.

Cover Image Credit: Luke Bagwell

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13 Things All Nursing Majors Know Really Well, Besides The Inside Of Their Eyelids

Ah yes, multiple night shifts, in a row. Splendid.
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College. The true test of how well you're able to balance sleep, school, and a social life all at once. Each student knows this struggle all too well, but nursing students are forced to take this juggling act to the extreme. Between early morning clinicals, studying, homework, PrepUs, and care plans there is barely any time left to have a social life, or let alone sleep. To prove the struggle, here are 13 things that all nursing majors know too well.

1. How all the professors acted during your first week of nursing school

2. When your clinical instructor makes you arrive at 6 a.m. sharp every week and stay until 4 p.m.


3. When your professors schedule two tests in the same week along with 25 PrepU quizzes


4. When your test answer was correct but not the MOST correct


5. When you go home for break and your family members ask you how nursing school is going


6. When you somehow find time to go out but don't know how to dress in something other than scrubs


7. When your patient presses the call light for the 100th time in the last 10 minutes


8. When your clinical instructor lets you pass meds and start an IV all in the same day


9. How you feel when your patient says, "You're going to be a great nurse someday!"


10. When your friends get upset that you can never hang out with them anymore


11. When you argue with your professor on a test question and earn the whole class points back


12. How you felt after you successfully gave your first shot to a patient


13. And when you realize that one day all of this stress and hard work will finally pay off and you will have the job of your dreams!

Cover Image Credit: @greysabc

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English Majors Should Be Assigned All Types Of Literature

It's time for a change.

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As you can probably guess, being an English major requires A LOT of reading. In my college career, I have read everything from Beowulf to Shakespeare. And some of the readings I do are definitely better than others.

In order for college students to be engaged and love what they read about, the book absolutely has to be interesting in some kind of way. Novels that are interesting to read don't necessarily have to be enjoyable. In fact, I really enjoy reading things that offer a new perspective from what I am used to.

If I have to read, comprehend, and get graded on a book, it makes my life so much easier if the content is enjoyable.

Some of my least favorite things I have been assigned to read from my classes are older works that are regarded as standard "literature." The word "literature" is so ambiguous; what is literature? What is not?

My least enjoyable classes with assigned readings are classes like British Literature and American Literature. I understand the importance of these classes, but I can't seem to find that type of literature enjoyable.

I think the main reason why this literature doesn't stick with me is that it's too predictable. These books have a certain kind of structure that is found all throughout the time period in which it was written. All of the written work from that particular time kind of runs together in my head. None of it holds my interest for very long.

On the other hand, some of the most interesting things I have read from my classes seem to come from my nonliterary classes. I took a Women's Studies class a few semesters ago and we read a studied about modern women who wrote about their experiences. Each and every one of these stories was unique, thought-provoking, and offered new perspectives.

One of my favorite books I read in this class was the memoir "Fun Home." Not only did this book discuss important issues, but it was also displayed and formatted in the form of a graphic novel. The pages had panels separating two different instances on the page. This novel kept me engaged from start to finish.

I understand the reason why we as English majors are always assigned so-called "classics." But it is just as important that we read about and discuss writers who are currently creating literature about the times and experiences that relate directly to today's society.

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