"The Red Pill" Movie Shines A New Light On The Men's Rights Movement

"The Red Pill" Movie Shines A New Light On The Men's Rights Movement

One feminist's journey into the men's rights movement.
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When you hear "the red pill," what do you think of? For most movie buffs, it's the popular sci-fi film "The Matrix." If you Google it right now, however, you'll find articles to links, trailers and interviews for a new documentary, featuring one feminist's journey into the Men's Rights Movement. Cassie Jaye, the woman behind the film, has experience investigating social movements before, directing award-winning documentaries like “Daddy I Do”, investigating the abstinence-only movement versus comprehensive sex education) and “The Right to Love: An American Family”, following one family’s activism fighting for same-sex marriage rights in California.

At first, she said on Dave Rubin's "Rubin Report", she set out to investigate what she was told was an underground, misogynist hate group, thriving in the darkest corners of the internet. Throughout her journey, however, she encountered something very different. This is the subject of her newly released documentary "The Red Pill."

The title of the film is a reference to the popular subreddit, The Red Pill , one of the most popular outlets of the men's rights movement and its supporters, often referred to as MRAs. The subreddit has over 180,000 subscribers.

The concept of "men's rights" seems strange and unnecessary in a number of modern, social movements. Most feminists would have you think,

Men already have rights. What right's could they possibly need to fight for? Any man fighting for men's rights is clearly a misogynist, pushing back against equality earned by feminists over the last century. It's nothing but a hate group.

As seen in the movie, Jaye interviews feminists along with the MRAs. Most of the feminists she interviews reject the notion that men's rights is a valid social movement. Jaye said on Steven Crowder's weekly show that she thought feminism was just about equality. She said she didn't subscribe to any specific schools of thought, she just believed equality was the central tenant of modern feminism.

While making the film, she said her perception of feminism changed. She said she began to recognize the toxic elements of modern feminism and the growing regressive left.

So, small spoiler alert, Jaye no longer considers herself a feminist. She said on Crowder's show that she thought it was important to remove the label because she no longer agreed with many of the platform positions that make up the modern feminism landscape, such as patriarchy theory.

The film has been met with positive reaction from not only men's rights activists, but also in right-leaning, libertarian and anti-SJW circles. On YouTube, you'll find a growing number of channels dedicated to anti-feminist viewpoints and schools of thought. A large number of men, and more women than progressive media outlets and website would like to acknowledge, are sick and tired of the constant victim and identity politics made mainstream by the media and pop culture.

Jaye's film not only highlights the many issues facing men today, such as domestic abuse and custody rights, but also the absolute backlash it receives from feminists and other leftist social movements.

Criticism of the film has mostly highlighted the documentaries lack of criticism for some of the extreme language coming out of men's rights circles, including the Red Pill subreddit and other MRA websites.

Is the men's rights movement perfect? No. But is feminism? Of course not. See the difference in those supporting the movie and those calling filmmaker Cassie Jaye a misogynist is the role of the victim in both movements. The Red Pill does not attempt to prove men are bigger victims in today's society than women.

Life is not the victim Olympics. People, individuals, can be victims. A woman, or a man, can be the victim of an abusive partner. A woman, or a man, can be the victim of a terrible judge who lets their personal beliefs get in the way of an honest and just ruling. Today, many young boys are faced with unfair standards when applying to colleges and universities, and in some fields, there are far more men working than women.

The Red Pill documentary is just trying to highlight those inequities men face in today's society. Inequities that have just as much right to be acknowledged as any problem woman face at home or in the workplace.

A growing number of tossed the blue pill in favor of the red. As the The Red Pill movie grows in popularity, so will it's following, as well as a new understanding of the modern Men's Rights Movement.

Cover Image Credit: "The Red Pill" Movie

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I'm The Girl Who'd Rather Raise A Family Than A Feminist Protest Sign

You raise your protest picket signs and I’ll raise my white picket fence.
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Social Media feeds are constantly filled with quotes on women's rights, protests with mobs of women, and an array of cleverly worded picket signs.

Good for them, standing up for their beliefs and opinions. Will I be joining my tight-knit family of the same gender?

Nope, no thank you.

Don't get me wrong, I am not going to be oblivious to my history and the advancements that women have fought to achieve. I am aware that the strides made by many women before me have provided us with voting rights, a voice, equality, and equal pay in the workforce.

SEE ALSO: To The Girl Who Would Rather Raise A Family Than A Feminist Protest Sign

For that, I am deeply thankful. But at this day in age, I know more female managers in the workforce than male. I know more women in business than men. I know more female students in STEM programs than male students. So what’s with all the hype? We are girl bosses, we can run the world, we don’t need to fight the system anymore.

Please stop.

Because it is insulting to the rest of us girls who are okay with being homemakers, wives, or stay-at-home moms. It's dividing our sisterhood, and it needs to stop.

All these protests and strong statements make us feel like now we HAVE to obtain a power position in our career. It's our rightful duty to our sisters. And if we do not, we are a disappointment to the gender and it makes us look weak.

Weak to the point where I feel ashamed to say to a friend “I want to be a stay at home mom someday.” Then have them look at me like I must have been brain-washed by a man because that can be the only explanation. I'm tired of feeling belittled for being a traditionalist.

Why?

Because why should I feel bad for wanting to create a comfortable home for my future family, cooking for my husband, being a soccer mom, keeping my house tidy? Because honestly, I cannot wait.

I will have no problem taking my future husband’s last name, and following his lead.

The Bible appoints men to be the head of a family, and for wives to submit to their husbands. (This can be interpreted in so many ways, so don't get your panties in a bunch at the word “submit”). God specifically made women to be gentle and caring, and we should not be afraid to embrace that. God created men to be leaders with the strength to carry the weight of a family.

However, in no way does this mean that the roles cannot be flipped. If you want to take on the responsibility, by all means, you go girl. But for me personally? I'm sensitive, I cry during horror movies, I'm afraid of basements and dark rooms. I, in no way, am strong enough to take on the tasks that men have been appointed to. And I'm okay with that.

So please, let me look forward to baking cookies for bake sales and driving a mom car.

And I'll support you in your endeavors and climb to the top of the corporate ladder. It doesn't matter what side you are on as long as we support each other, because we all need some girl power.

Cover Image Credit: Unsplash

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To Donald Trump: Thank U, Next

Look what you taught us.

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What Donald Trump taught me is that it is not essential for the president to care about his country. Con-artistry goes a long way when communicating with people who are tired of the same political jargon.

His simple-minded but outlandish promises convinced people significant change was coming. Donald Trump taught me that never again do I want a president to be thought of as "one of us."

Instead, I want someone smart, ethical and who has taken a basic civics course — someone who will take care of minorities and make those in dire situations a priority instead of stock market prices.

I want a president that doesn't brag about sexually assaulting women. I want a president that doesn't go on social media and blame homicide victims for not being armed. I want a president that doesn't complain about money when people are dying and losing their homes in a massive fire.

However, with that being said, I also want to give thanks to Trump. Because of him, the next generation sees how crucial it is to get out and vote. Most of your elders probably never spoke to an LGBTQ person, but you and your siblings grew up with LGBTQ friends, and you would never want them to be treated any lesser than you. You grew up with women dominating television. You grew up under the leadership of an African American president. You grew up in a world that was changing.

Some people don't like change, but you are the future, and it is your decision what you want that future to be. So thank you Donald Trump, for being the last big push Americans needed to completely change a world that was once dominated by violence and hate crimes. However, I think most of us can agree we are ready for what's coming next.

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