The honeymoon phase.

Before I got my diagnosis, I'd never even heard of it. And I didn't actually hear about it until I was six months in. In layman's terms, a honeymoon phase for type on diabetics is a period of time after diagnosis when your pancreas is still spitting out some insulin. Therefore, your blood sugar is vaguely regulated.

At the risk of sounding bitter, basically, it's like the honeymoon phase in dating, too: You think everything is going to be a lot easier than everyone says.

December 2016, nearly a year after I was diagnosed, my numbers started going up exponentially. I was in the 200s pretty consistently. (Layman's terms again: Normal range for me is 70-150. Good is usually between 80-130.) I was given a slight up-dose in long-lasting insulin, and for about five months, it went well. Then, in April, my blood sugar started going up again. Consistent 200-300 ranges.

I was a bit freaked out, to be certain.

A slight upping of insulin dosage again and a switch of endocrinologist shot my blood sugar down again - for about two months. But I was now riding on about a year of consistently high blood sugar, and nothing was happening.

My endocrinologist drastically changed my insulin regimen. And things have been a lot better - meaning that it's on the low side a bit more often. But I've been yo-yo-ing, and that's less than ideal, too.

Yesterday was not a typical day for me, but here's how it went:

9:00 - I get back from my 7:30 class and take a nap. 204.

11:30 - I wake up, not even feeling off or anything, and take my blood sugar. 48. (This is the lowest I've ever been, by the way.)

12:30 - I take my blood sugar to make sure everything's okay. 235.

2:00 - That insulin I gave myself worked its job. 100.

5:30 - I take my blood sugar again. Things have leveled out fairly well at 90 before dinner.

I'm not bitter, and this isn't a rant. This is a reach out to my diabetic brothers and sisters out there. The fact of the matter is, our disease is hard to deal with. I've always known that, but I've been reminded of that in the past week. This morning I woke up feeling physically weak from laying awake half the night, terrified I was going to go low.

I feel you guys. And I felt so alone this week, knowing there was no one nearby who understood what, exactly, I was going through.

I just want to put it out there, so you guys know: You're not alone. There's plenty of other people out there like you who get it. We may not be close by, but we're here.