Summer Break: The Advantages And Disadvantages

Summer Break: The Advantages And Disadvantages

Is it worth it?

Ah, summer break. Just those two words bring back fond memories of my family and I gardening out front, splashing around in our swimming pool, and taking trips to Disney World. I think that almost every student in the world longs for the end of the school year. After all, it’s a time to finally relax and sleep in after finals or exams. Yet the several weeks that make up summer break do come with some drawbacks.

I wonder, are the months without school really needed? Here’s a look at the advantages and disadvantages of having a summer break:


No Homework or Tests

This is probably the most obvious advantage of summer break. We don’t have any essays, short papers, quizzes, and or exams to worry about. There’s no studying, no deadlines, it’s just free time all the time.

Spending Time with Friends and Family

The week can get so busy during school that spending some down time with friends or family may not be possible. But during the fun weeks of summer break, you can finally get that chance to sit down and relax with the ones you care about.

A Perfect Opportunity to Go On Vacation

In addition to having free time to spend with family and friends, summer break also presents a great chance to go on a nice get-away vacation. As mentioned, when I was younger, the end of the school year was often celebrated with a trip to Disney World with my parents. Whether it be a day long or week long trip, it is always nice to experience a change of environment and have some fun.


Becoming Out of Practice

When you have several weeks off of school, you lose the learning rhythm you developed over the course of the school year. That includes waking up early or at a specific time, forgetting whatever you learned, the disruption of your studying practices, and the impeding of any organizational habits you established. When it comes time for summer break to end, it can be quite difficult to get back into your normal school routine and schedule.

For Some, Boredom

I remember when the first couple weeks of summer break were over, I kept on thinking: “OK...what now?” Having a few months off of school seemed like heaven at first, but then I found myself getting bored. I’ve heard the same from other as well. Sometimes you can have so much free, unproductive, time that you may not know what to do with yourself. Your friends may have their own plans for the summer, and you could have already caught up on everything you wanted to now?

It’s always nice to have a break now and again. However, too long a break can result in the disruption of habits when getting back into a regular school routine. I think the best way to fix this, is to take part in a part time summer course that keeps you in a learning state of mind while still having enough time to relax throughout the day, or simply looking through your school notes or work now and again to refresh your memory. This could help the transition back into school a little less tedious. Have a great summer break, everyone!

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Success Is Great, But Failure Is Better

Fail and fail often.

Don’t let success get to your head, but don’t let failure get to your heart. Know that things don’t always work out as planned, and that is OK!

For many millennials, it’s easiest to just give up when something doesn’t go your way. But take heart. Success is great, but failure is better. The reality is, you’re going to fail... a lot.

Failure does not mean your idea was not good or that your dream isn’t valid.

Failure means you have more to learn.

Failure is GOOD.

It shows you that you did something wrong and that you need to take a redirection. It’s an opportunity to come back stronger with a better attack plan. It’s a second chance.

Having failed many times in my life, there’s one thing for sure: failing sucks. It sucks being disappointed. It sucks not succeeding on the first try. However, you can learn to become a good failure.

Failing is inevitable, which is why it is important to learn from our mistakes. You’ll learn more from a single failure than a lifetime of success. Here’s what you can do when you mess up: accept what you can’t change, keep an open mind, maintain a positive attitude, and know that nothing will be perfect.

When I was a sophomore in high school, I was on an engineering team at my school. I was extremely confident in our abilities as a team, so when we didn’t advance to the world finals, I was devastated. The next year, however, my team placed second at the national competition, and we advanced to the world finals. If I had allowed that initial failure to consume me, I wouldn’t have been successful the next year.

It was not easy to advance to the world finals, but because I took my previous failure as a learning opportunity, my team succeeded. I knew I couldn’t change the past, so I didn’t focus on it. I kept an open mind about the competition and did not allow my bitterness to harden me, thus maintaining a positive attitude. My team wasn’t perfect, and I knew that. But I knew if we worked hard, we would succeed. We did.

Every failure is feedback on how to improve. Nothing works unless you do, and nothing works exactly the way you want it to. Failure is life’s greatest teacher; it’s nothing to be scared of. If we are so focused on not failing, we will never succeed.

So fail, and fail often.

Cover Image Credit: Pixabay

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7 Things English Majors Go Through

Yes, I'm an English major. No, I'm not throwing away my education.

I love being an English major.

And no -- I'm not lying.

While I do advocate for womxn in tech and the rise of STEM majors, my heart belongs to the humanities and more importantly: English Literature.

Here are some of the things as an English Major that I have experienced:

1. So... Do you wanna be a teacher?

As an English Major, my sole purpose of getting my degree is not to just become a teacher. I also want to be a writer. Get it right. I also want to be a teacher, though, so...

2. Writer's Block

Writer's block = hell unleashed. My brain is my most valued. My heart, too, but my brain is what helps me actually write my essays and poems. When my brain isn't working, I'm not working, and with those two not working -- I'm not getting anything done.

3. Having Friends Ask You To Edit Their Papers

My mood 24/7 when people ask me to edit their papers. I'm working on my own, leave me alone. Seriously though, I know I'm an English major, but there's a reason why office hours were created -- but if you REALLY need my editing/revising, pay up.

4. Reading "Whatever" Literature

There are some great works that I love reading (Frankenstein, Great Expectations, Dr. J & Mr. H, etc). But if I'm forced to read another book that EVERYONE has "read" and ends with the classic patriarchal ending -- I'd rather not. Give me some more Mary Shelley, please.

5. Reading AMAZING Literature

OK BUT WHEN THE CLASS READS SOMETHING LIKE MRS. DALLOWAY -- I AM SO HAPPY (I love you, V.W). But, honestly, I love most literature (especially classics). It's only with very few works that I'm upset with reading. (50 Shades of Grey? Blegh.)

6. Getting Trash-Talked About Your Major

OkAy, SuSaN, I get that you're happy with being in the business school, but frankly I don't care, so don't worry about me or my major. We, English majors, get trash-talked about our majors. Back in the day, our major was considered noble and great -- and now it's considered as "throwing away our education".

7. Knowing that We Chose the Right Major

In my experience in college so far, I've met very few -- actually no one who has changed their major from English Lit/CRTWRT. (Disclaimer: I'm sure there are some?) But those of us who stayed with this major know that we chose the right path for ourselves. While our friends in STEM, Business, etc. are "having fun" with their path, we get to read our favorite works, write, and appreciate the arts. So... who's the real winner? ;)

Cover Image Credit: Study Breaks

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