SOHO International Film Festival: Little Miss Perfect's NYC Premiere

SOHO International Film Festival: Little Miss Perfect's NYC Premiere

"I am worth something. We all are."


Little Miss Perfect written and directed by the naturally talented NYU Tisch alumna, Marlee Roberts on June 11, 2016 at 9:15 pm. A coveted prime spot so well deserved by the overall work of the cast and crew whose ultimate goal was to tell the truth about Anorexia nervosa, which is the most common cause of death among young women ages 15 to 24. Little Miss Perfect is a work of art carefully crafted for two years and the results are stunning. The story focuses on the character Belle, portrayed by the lovely Columbia University Film Student, Karlee Roberts, whom is an overachieving high school freshman, that stumbles upon an online pro-eating disorder subculture as cracks begin to appear in her seemingly perfect life.

Actress Karlee Roberts as Belle in Little Miss Perfect

To set up the scene, it was a vivid night in The East Village as many huddled around the red carpet waiting for the stars to make their entrance into the robust Village East Cinema. Photos of the cast and crew were taken, as well as their honorable and esteemed guests all excited for the film's NYC Premiere. Grabbing my popcorn and bottled water, after the red carpet photos of course, this reporter made her way to her seat. As everyone was finally in their seats the night began with a short from our neighbors to the north in Canada called "Papa Pasquale". A perfect introduction to the film as "Papa Pasquale" told the story of Italian immigrants and their journey to a new world. The short was a beautiful portrayal of how many families left their homeland to find a better life and how they brought others to live with them as well. Then after a silent interlude, the film began.

Throughout the film, it was evident that the writer and director, Marlee Roberts, had really tapped into the good, the bad, and the ugly of what young girls go through when they are in their teenage developing years. Armed with a world class education, boundless natural talent, and thorough psychological research, Marlee Roberts, created a remarkable piece of art from paper to the screen all while entertaining and educating at the same time. In the film, one can notice how delicately crafted each scene was prepared in order to capture the exact tone of the performance needed to satisfy the audience of what they kept asking themselves "How far is Belle going to go?" or "How does this happen to a girl like her?". The truth is the disease of Anorexia nervosa can happen to girls like Belle, and the situations she goes through happens to many girls growing up in America. The societal pressures keep increasing with the access of technology that can connect friends and strangers, and even people who want to hurt us. It is becoming easier to be exposed to blogs that make even the most confident person doubt their worth to the point of starving themselves to achieve an impossible and unhealthy body type. So what does this film show? It shows the emotional impact that only a writer and director like Marlee Roberts can accomplish. What makes Marlee Roberts an incredible player in the film industry is the small choices she has made to make the film what it is and of course the awards she has won. Genuine is what the film industry will get when they work with Marlee, and after the film the cast displayed their love for their writer and director as she listened to them as well as guided them through difficult roles only the best in the business could have handled.

Writer and Director Marlee Roberts behind the scenes of Little Miss Perfect

Marlee Roberts, wrote the screenplay as a play on "Beauty and the Beast" with the "Beast" in this scenario being within the main character, Belle. Almost an anti-fairy tale of the modern age, Little Miss Perfect, is a film not just for those who want to learn more about Anorexia nervosa, but also for those who need to face their inner beast because we all have one. With that said, Hollywood needs to face their inner beast with how they portray women directors in the industry. Hollywood needs to stop running away from accepting women directors as key players for the sake of film itself. Gone are the days that women are not graduating as much from film schools than men are so why are there so few women directors? If anything, Marlee Roberts, a graduate from the prestigious NYU Tisch, is a testament to what the future of film needs to be and why Hollywood should face their beast and stand up to their old sexist ways.

When the film was over I was left with an empty bag of popcorn and a smile on my face. Much of the film is left up to interpretation to the viewer, which in my opinion is what makes a film even greater. To me, it reminds me that our lives are up to interpretation, we are the only ones who can face our beasts, and then look into the mirror and realize that we are worth something. You are your own beauty and your own beast who walks along life with a rose in your hand as a reminder that you do not have to be perfect, because you are already perfect the way you are.

As for writer and director, Marlee Roberts, this is only the beginning of many more works of art to come, so sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride.

For more information on Little Miss Perfect see the following:


Film Website


Instagram #FaceYourBeast

Cover Image Credit: Little Miss Perfect Movie

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How SoundCloud Is Changing The Music Industry

Many of the most popular artists in the music industry all got their start on SoundCloud.

It’s no secret that the term “SoundCloud rapper” has changed in recent years. Due to the number of popular artists that originated from SoundCloud, aspiring artists are posting their music there in hopes of becoming famous now more than ever. This phenomenon has helped crank out some of the hottest artists in the music industry right now, and there are more artists blowing up every month.

Soundcloud has changed the game in the hip-hop scene. It was first founded in June of 2007 in Alexander Ljung and Eric Wahlforss and was launched in October of 2008. It was originally intended to allow musicians to collaborate by facilitating the sharing and discussion of recorded audio but quickly became a music distribution tool. It offers a platform for artists to build a profile of their music and gain a following.

With the amount of music and so-called “SoundCloud rappers” on the site, the industry is flooding with more and more talent. Some of your favorite artists who are topping the Billboard Top 100 charts right now originated from Soundcloud, and you might not even know it.

Recent notable artists that got their start on SoundCloud include XXXTentacion, Post Malone, Lil Pump, Travis Scott, Playboi Carti, Lil Yachty, and even Lil Uzi Vert. They first started posting their music on Soundcloud and quickly built significant followings. Not only have they not been known for more than a couple years, but some of them have made timeless classics that you’ll be hearing for many years to come.

Post Malone’s first studio album, “Stoney [Deluxe Version],” released on December 6th, 2016, peaked at #1 on the Billboard Top 100 and was on the Billboard Top 100 for seventeen straight weeks. His album went platinum less than six months after being released. That album then reached double-platinum about six and a half months later.

His most popular song on that album, “Congratulations,” went platinum in about three and a half months after its release and has since gone 7x Platinum (selling seven million units) a little over a year and three months after its release according to the RIAA.

Another prime example of a popular SoundCloud originating artist is Lil Pump, who was one of the fastest growing artists in 2017 and 2018. He released his first album ever, "Lil Pump," on October 6th of 2017. On that album was his song, “Gucci Gang,” which went platinum a little after four months from its original release on September 1st of 2017.

For a SoundCloud artist who first started making music in late 2016 and putting up big numbers on SoundCloud with songs like "Boss," which went RIAA certified gold, and "Drose" in 2017, he's a prime example of an artist that originated from SoundCloud and became one of the biggest names in hip-hop in just under a year.

These hip-hop artists, along with many others, that originated from Soundcloud have made big marks on the music industry by making multiple platinum and triple platinum hits on multiple songs and albums, as well as some making songs that each top the Billboard Top 100 Charts consistently for multiple weeks in a row.

These facts not only describe the artists themselves, but it also paints a picture of how Soundcloud and the internet are shaping the music industry and making music more successful and accessible than ever. Soundcloud is one of the primary drivers of bringing up new artists and making networking easier than it ever has by allowing music to flourish and reach more people.

Cover Image Credit: Wikimedia

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Gen Z Will Never Truly Understand How We Felt Growing Up With Harry Potter

I met Emma Watson in real life, and I'm surprised I didn't cry.

Is it just me or are other people also getting the feels for the new Fantastic Beast film? I’m a huge Harry Potter nerd. I cried so hard in the movie theater when the last Harry Potter movie screened. I’m so in love with the series, so much so that I’m planning to get the Deathly Hallows tattooed on me.

To be honest, I’m surprised I haven’t even gotten it done yet! Kiddos of Generation Z, the ones born after the Millennials, will never truly understand the intensity of what it felt like growing up watching the franchise.

Don’t get me wrong, I love the new Fantastic Beast franchise but only because I was in denial for so long that my childhood had ended when the Harry Potter movies did.

I grew up with the magical trio themselves. I was around six when the first movie came out, and at the time I had two really close best friends, so it was as if I saw us three on the screen.

Recently, I visited the Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios in Los Angeles. I have dreamt of going to the UK to visit the set of Harry Potter for the real deal but I haven’t had the opportunity yet. Universal Studios is the best I can do for now. When I was there, I realized that the majority of people who were having the most fun were people in their early 20s. Sure there were little rascals running around in little robes and wands but us, millennials, grew up with so much curiosity; wondering what the wizarding world was like.

1. Wondering what butterbeer tastes like

2. Waiting to receive your Hogwarts acceptance letter

3. Punching Dudley in the face

4. Looking for Platform 9 and 3/4 at every train station you went to

5. Getting sorted into your house

(By the way, I’m Slytherin.)

6. Playing Quidditch

There's Quidditch in college, guys. I'm shook.

7. Spending most of your childhood going “It’s leviOsa, not leviosA”

I teared up going through “Hogwarts” when I was on the ride. Harry Potter meant so much more to me than just a movie. While he was going through difficult trials in his life, fighting Voldemort and trolls in the girl’s bathroom, I was being bullied and fighting Voldemorts and trolls of my own. Harry gave me hope that I wouldn’t give up. No matter how many times I felt like I’d lost, I remembered him not quitting and as a young teen constantly watching movies and being surrounded by media. I think I chose a pretty good role model.

Growing up side by side with Harry and being around the same age as him, allowed me to fight my battles while he was fighting his. I’m happy that people of Gen Z will be able to experience a different type of wonder and curiosity through the new franchise. It was a magical experience for me and I hope it is for them as well.

Cover Image Credit: Nacha Promsatian

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