Slam Poetry: A Hidden Wonder

Slam Poetry: A Hidden Wonder

A thank you to those who turn feelings into words
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Slam poetry is one of the hidden wonders in today’s world. I didn’t discover slam poems myself until my senior year of high school when my English teacher had us watch “Somewhere in America." I was hit hard by the power this poem was able to possess. From that point on, I was hooked on slam poetry. I’ve spent numerous hours watching various slam poems on YouTube, ranging in themes from unrequited love to depression. I’ve found the way a slam poem makes me feel is unlike anything else. This is a thank you letter to those who write and perform slam poetry.

I’d like to say thank you for speaking for millions of us. Numerous poets admit they write for themselves, but have the courage to share their deepest feelings with the world. Thank you for that. I can’t even begin to tell you how much your words have influenced me. Slam poetry has been an emotional support system for me when I had nothing else. I thought there was no one out there who had ever gone through the situation that I was currently in, but slam poetry always taught me otherwise. Someone out there was always feeling just the same.

Your ability to turn such raw, powerful emotions into such heart-wrenching analogies is beyond belief. I’m not sure what is running through a slam poet’s mind when they begin writing, but the ability to compare one’s happiness to the most perfect object is a true talent. I’ve tried writing slam poetry for a few months now, and I’ve never been that successful. Turning one’s deepest thoughts into words is difficult as is, but having an ability to wave tears through a crowd is beyond belief. If I could have any talent in the world, it’d honestly be to write slam poetry. It’s something I truly admire.

My favorite slam poems have helped me in my darkest of moments. Right now, I’m completely in love with “To the Boy I Would Have Lost My Virginity To” by Anna Binkovitz. Anna shares with the world the struggles of her eating disorder and how that makes her feel when she wants to have sex with someone, especially the guy who would've been her first. Another classic on my list is, “When Love Arrives” by Sarah Kay and Phil Kaye. It's a laid-back twist on the feeling of finding your soulmate from a young age. Lastly, there’s “How to Succeed in Heartbreak” by Victoria Morgan, who will have anyone who’s ever experienced a bad end to a relationship relating from a deeper level. As you can tell, all of these poems have greatly contrasting themes, but still have an ability to relate to my life and keep me coming back for more.

Slam poets, this is my final thank you. Without your work I’d be left alone at my darkest moments; wondering why I was forced into a difficult situation. Your ability to turn your heartbreak into inspirational work for numerous people is truly wonderful. I’ll never be able to thank you enough.

I fully believe the best way to get through a difficult time is to write about it. Get all your feelings out on paper and let it be known that you’re pissed off, or completely in love. Whatever you write may be shitty at first, as most of my writings are, but I promise you will one day write something worth sharing with the world. Who knows, you could have the world's next hit slam poem in your hands!

Cover Image Credit: Brokebutbougie.com

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9 Ways To Get A Writer To Fall For You, Take Notes

The ultimate guide for that writer in your life.
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Writers are interesting people. When looking for a special person to have in their lives, there are certain qualities that stand out to them. The little things you do could mean a lot to a writer.

1. Text in complete sentences

While finishing each other's sentences would be a huge plus, all you really have to worry about is finishing your own. It doesn't have to be in MLA format or anything!

2. Use proper grammar

Knowing the correct their/there/they're and your/you're is super attractive to writers. And for most, it may actually be a deal-breaker.

3. Bring them coffee

Who knows when inspiration could strike. If it's late and they're awake writing, coffee will make them fall in love with you.

4. Read what they write

Tell them you want to read their content and let them know you like it. There is no better way to get to a writer's heart.

5. Don't judge them for what they're not doing so they can write

They don't want to go out because they have a deadline? Laundry is long overdue because they have an idea for an article? They haven't slept in three days writing something detrimental? It's all fine! Don't judge!

6. Don't tell them they're wasting their time

Whether they are writing for fun, because they want a career writing, or their career is writing, do not tell them they are wasting their time. It is obviously important to them and they are passionate about it, so let them enjoy themselves.

7. Leave them alone right before deadline

I'm sure the writer you're pursuing loves having your attention... maybe just not the day before or of a deadline. They get stressed and you probably don't want to be near any of that anyway.

8. If they have anything published, share it with the entire world

There is no better way to show your support than to share a writer's content. It says, "I care about this person and I care about what they have to say." Their heart is guaranteed to be yours if you help their voice be heard.

9. Don't get overwhelmed by all the words they throw at you

Writers are just wordy people. They have a lot to say all the time. Don't take it as them being extra, embrace the fact that they want to tell you everything they're thinking.

Cover Image Credit: Lovianna Blackwell

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How My Mental Health Affects My Love Life

This is for the boy who told me I didn't have it put together.
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In light of Valentine's Day, I've been thinking about my own (nonexistent) love life. Now, when I say nonexistent, I mean it wholeheartedly. I'm the girl my guy friends turn to and ask "You got any single friends?" Without fail, my answer is "No, I am the single friend."

I come from a very conservative Christian background and many of the people I know got married fairly young. A decent number of my friends from church are either engaged, married, or expecting. It's not that you're expected to get married young, but oftentimes that's how it ends up happening. Men will return from their mission and be engaged or married within a year. So as a nineteen year old who has never been in a serious relationship, I feel like I'm falling behind.

I've been in exactly one (one month long) relationship in my life, which is what inspired me to write this article. When the boy in question was breaking up with me, he made a point of telling me that I "don't have everything put together." Needless to say, that did not go over well with me at all.

First of all, NO ONE has everything put together. We try to act like we do, but in reality we're all struggling in our own ways. It's what makes us human.

Second of all, who was he to tell me that I don't have everything put together? Granted, I don't have everything put together, but it still was not his place to make that judgement. I'm the only one who can decide if I have it "put together." This statement of his particularly set me off because I may still be struggling, but I'm doing significantly better than I was a year ago.

As someone with bipolar disorder, I have major reservations when it comes to dating. I tend to form emotional attachments rather quickly, which can sometimes get me into trouble. Like I said, I've only been in one official "relationship" before, but it's not the only time I've ever come close to dating someone. I've "talked to" (for lack of a better word, I hate that phrase) a few boys, only to be ghosted or led on. It's become something of a pattern in my life and let me tell you, it doesn't feel good.

When I get ghosted, or when a guy leads me on for a while only to tell me he's not interested or whatever his excuse is, I start doubting myself. What makes me so undatable? Am I not attractive/smart/funny enough? No, it's probably the bipolar disorder. That, plus my anxiety and constant need for reassurance.

I begin to worry that it's because I'm too needy, too "moody," too much to handle. I shut myself off to people because I assume that that's how things are going to end--with them finding some flaw, some deal breaker, and deciding that it's not worth the effort of being with me. I get so scared that my mental health will be a deal breaker. But why should that be the case?

Answer: it shouldn't. No one should have those doubts about themself, especially over things that can't necessarily be controlled. I can't control the fact that I have anxiety and bipolar disorder, just like people can't control their height or their eye color. It would be stupid not to date someone because they have blue eyes and you want someone with green eyes, would it not? So why miss out on dating an amazing person just because they struggle with their mental health?

Just because someone is struggling with something that you don't understand doesn't mean that they're not worth your time. Take the time to understand them, love them, and appreciate them, even if it seems like you're taking a risk. Who knows? It could be the best risk you'll ever take.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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