Schools Should Be Prepared to Stop Future Gunmen
Start writing a post
Sports

Schools Should Be Better Prepared If They Hope To Prevent Future Killing Sprees

Arm the teachers with the skills and knowledge, not handguns.

71
Schools Should Be Better Prepared If They Hope To Prevent Future Killing Sprees
xandtor

Often times, after the identity of a mass shooter is revealed, people that know or have met the shooter will come forward and talk about their character and the warning signs they saw. One of the most prevalent people that talk about the warning signs are teachers. They often talk about how the people who have committed these crimes were students that acted out in class or didn't like to listen to authority. This raises the question: should schools be better prepared to deal with the warning signs of future shooters?

There have been a lot of ads that are aimed at exposing the warning signs of a shooter, but it feels like they're aimed more at students noticing the warning signs of other students, not teachers or administrators noticing the warning signs. While I do believe that students should be responsible for noticing the warning signs of a potential school shooter and to tell an administrator, what are they supposed to do after that? Students have no powers when it comes to actually act on the signs they see.

When administrators notice the signs, it is their job to intervene. Schools need to be better preparing their teachers with the skills and knowledge on how to deal with these students. In no way I am sitting here saying that it is teachers and administrators fault that students go on to be mass shooters, I am saying that if teachers and administrators were better prepared in identifying and acting on the signs of a shooter, that might may a difference.

The recent shooting in Thousand Oaks, California, prompted some high school coaches of the gunman, Ian David Long, to come forward and talk about the way the student behaved in high school. The track coach at Long's high school, Evie Cluke, said that Long was "volatile and intimidating" and that "repeated complaints to school administrators about his behavior failed to prompt any discipline." She then goes on to say that, when asked why he wanted to serve in the armed forces: "he said he wanted to be in the Marines because he wanted to go fight in the war for our country and he wanted to kill for our country."

The coach brought this up to administrators, but nothing was done, and this seems to be a pattern. Just attending a high school, you are able to see that administrators have no way of dealing with students that do not want to follow authority, let alone have the abilities to deal with the very real signs of a future mass shooter.

School officials need to be better trained in how to handle students that continue to act out or show warning signs. Also, there need to be outlets on school campuses that students can turn to. Students need people that are professionally trained to listen to their problems and help them through it. By increasing the know-how of school staff to better handle and diffuse possible future situations, there is the small, but likely, chance that we can slowly decrease the number of mass shooters.

Report this Content
This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
Featured

The Heart Wants what the Heart Wants

Just remember sometimes it is gonna hurt, whether we want it to or not!

15
The Heart Wants what the Heart Wants
Where to start...... Let me start with the cliche that life throws us curveballs and what we do with it is what counts.

One day he walked into my life. UNEXPECTED! And one day he walked out!

Keep Reading... Show less
Content Inspiration

Top 3 Response Articles of This Week

See which conversations rose to the top on Odyssey this week!

381
Pixabay

New response writers means exciting new conversations on Odyssey! We're proud to spotlight our talented creators and the topics that matter most to them. Here are the top three response articles of last week:

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

Heart on a Wet Sleeve

No one prepares you for the honeymoon phase wearing off

2720
Heart on a Wet Sleeve

Let's start off with the simple fact that God made everyone differently. That statement could not be more evident. We try to embrace our differences and set ourselves apart from the rest of the world. What that doesn't prepare us for is when we yearn for a characteristic of someone else. For example, have you ever met someone who can experience this great heart ache and hardly shed a tear? This person just had their heart ripped out and they find a way to carry themselves through it with great composure. Well, not all of us have that desirable trait. Some of us wear our hearts on our wet sleeves. When a person has their heart on their sleeve, it can be viewed as a good thing, that the individual isn't shallow. However,

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

Panic! At The Disco Announces Breakup After 19 Years

Band Makes Breakup Announcement Official: 'Will Be No More'

12410
panic at the disco

It's the end of an era. Originally formed in 2004 by friends in Las Vegas, Panic! At The Disco is no more.

Brendon Urie announced on Instagram that the band will be coming to an end after the upcoming Europe tour. He said that he and his wife are expecting a baby, and the life change weighed heavily in his mind to come to this decision. "Sometimes a journey must end for a new one to begin," he said.

Keep Reading... Show less
Content Inspiration

Top 3 Response Articles of This Week

Odyssey's response writer community is growing- read what our new writers have to say!

17555
https://www.pexels.com/photo/person-writing-on-white-book-1043514/
https://www.pexels.com/photo/person-typing-on-type...

Each week, more response writers are joining the Odyssey community. We're excited to spotlight their voices on as they engage in constructive dialogue with our community. Here are the top three response articles of last week:

Keep Reading... Show less

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Facebook Comments