5 Times Ryan From "The Office" Described What It's Like To Be An Intern

5 Times Ryan From 'The Office' Perfectly Described What It's Like To Be An Intern

Cause "Ryan started the FIRE!"

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Interning has become the linch-pin of every college education. How important is it? I honestly can't tell you, but if my professors and career advisors are to be believed I better have more internships than class credits if I want to have enough "real world" job experience to be a hire-able college graduate.

Getting an internship (or at least finding ones you can apply to): not as hard as you'd think. Sure, it's a pain in the butt to make a résumé, write a separate cover letter for each organization, and then try to (hopefully) work out interviewing between a business's operating hours and your 15+ hour semester workload. At least once you get the hang of it you realize that you have like *zero* experience so your résumé is basically every job and volunteer position you've had in the past 6 years and that you just can write one cover letter and alter the names of the organizations and key information.

The hard part is your attitude about the internship itself. Most likely, you are unpaid. Strike 1. You have to manage to work out internship hours around a class schedule, usually while still managing to get in a respectable (15+) hours of college credit within that 4 month period. While attitudes about interns vary from organization to organization, you have to realize that you are the new person whose basic implied job title is helping with whatever you're asked. Add all this to you is, in fact, the *new* person (i.e.you are thrown into an environment where everyone inevitably already has their work friends and could be anywhere from a recent college graduate to a person near retirement age). So, yeah, sometimes coming into the internship with a good attitude - and more importantly keeping that good attitude - can be more of a struggle that one might think.

1. That time he finally went out with Kelly...on February 13th. Rookie Temp Mistake Ryan.

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Keep this in mind interns: internship romances aren't Jim and Pam.

2. That time he thought he was moving up in sales but was super awkward at the meeting so Stanley made fun of him for the rest of the work day. 

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Ambition in an internship is a good thing, but make sure you know what you're getting yourself into or risk the consequences of your superior's mocking.

3. That time he seriously started to doubt his career path. 

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Yup. That'll show'em.

4. That time when (even if he was an "employee") people still didn't know his name.

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And just think - when you're an intern you're the "new person" so NO ONE will no know your name.

5. That "Wait. What?" Face of all internships' first days. 

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I'm supposed to copy what for who in which order? Could you repeat that? But I swear I was listening the first time.

That being said, I think internships are great! The two I've had have been informative, fun, and really related to what I want to do with my life. So I'm benefitting from the internship-pushing undergraduate world. But for those of you who aren't (or at least are having a bad day) here are 5 times when Ryan Howard's temp troubles at Dunder Mifflin couldn't possibly be worse than yours.

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36 Rules Of Life From 'NCIS's' Leroy Jethro Gibbs

Sometimes we all need a smack on the back of the head.
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I have been watching "NCIS" since the show began back in 2003, and season 15 will be airing this September. It is one of the longest running series and for a good reason, even though a lot of your favorite characters die off in the show they somehow still keep it alive. Anyone who has watched an episode or more knows about the infamous Gibbs's rules. Here's the list that we can gather from the many episodes:

Rule 1: "Never let suspects stay together." - revealed in the Season 1 premiere episode, Yankee White (episode).

Rule 2: "Never screw over your partner." - revealed in the Season 4 episode, Blowback (episode). McGee also stated this rule to Ned Dorneget in Need to Know (episode). McGee also mentioned to Abigail Borin in Ships in the Night (episode) that rule number one has been taken twice, showing that he knows that there are two number one rules.

Rule 3: "Always wear gloves at a crime scene." - revealed in "Yankee White."

Rule 4: "Don't believe what you're told. Double check." - again revealed in "Yankee White."

Rule 5: "Never be unreachable." - revealed in the Season 3 episode, Deception (episode) although Gibbs has been known to be intentionally unreachable. The rule was shown in Rule Fifty-One (episode) in the background when Gibbs opens the box.

Rule 6: "The best way to keep a secret? Keep it to yourself. Second best? Tell one other person - if you must. There is no third best." - revealed in the Season 4 episode, Blowback (episode)

Rule 7: "You don't waste good." - revealed in the Season 8 episode, Baltimore (episode).

Rule 8: "Never say you're sorry. It's a sign of weakness." - This rule has been mentioned throughout the series, but it wasn't given a specific number until Flesh and Blood (episode). The rule is also a direct reference to John Wayne's catch phrase in "She Wore A Yellow Ribbon" (John Ford, Director). Wayne said: "Never apologize, mister, it's a sign of weakness." to subordinates in a military situation. DiNozzo notes the connection in Hiatus Part 1 (episode). Mark Harmon's career has paralleled John Wayne's. They both were quarterback of their southern California college football team, both went into acting. (Harmon's father, Tom Harmon, was a Heisman Trophy-winner and actor & announcer as well.) Note: This is continuously told to Tony, Ziva and Tim through a smack to the back of their heads.

Rule 9: "Always be specific when you lie." - revealed in the Season 1 finale episode, Reveille (episode).

Rule 10: "Never take anything for granted." - revealed in the Season 3 episode, Probie (episode) although Gibbs also quotes it as being "Never assume" during the Season 9 episode, Rekindled (episode).

Rule 11: "Never go anywhere without a knife." - revealed in the Season 1 episode, One Shot, One Kill (episode)although it's sometimes quoted as "Never leave home without a knife" or "Always carry a knife."

Rule 12: "Never get personally involved in a case." - revealed in the Season 7 episode, Obsession (episode) and again referenced by the new SECNAV Clayton Jarvis in the Season 9 premiere episode, Nature of the Beast (episode) as the number one rule in Washington politics.

Rule 13: "When the job is done, walk away." - revealed in the Season 6 episode, Semper Fidelis (episode).

Rule 14: "Never date a co-worker." - revealed in the Season 1 episode, Enigma (episode).

Rule 15: "Never, ever involve lawyers." - revealed in "Collateral Damage." Rule 51 is written on the back of the card containing Rule 13 in "Rule Fifty-One."

Rule 16: "Bend the line, don't break it." - revealed in Anonymous was a Woman (episode).

Rule 17: "Always work as a team." - revealed in Leap of Faith (episode).

Rule 18: "If someone thinks they have the upper hand, break it." - revealed in the Season 8 finale episode, Pyramid (episode).

Rule 19: "Never, ever interrupt Gibbs during an interrogation." - revealed in the Season 14 episode, Privileged Information (episode).

Rule 20: "It's better to seek forgiveness than ask permission." - revealed in Silver War (episode).

Rule 21: "Always look under." - revealed in The Artful Dodger (episode)

Rule 22: "Never ever bother Gibbs in interrogation." - revealed in Smoked (episode).

Rule 23: "Never mess with a Marine's coffee... if you want to live."- revealed during "Forced Entry."

Rule 24: "There are two ways to follow someone. First way, they never notice you. Second way, they only notice you." - Jack Knife (episode) and "Rule Fifty-One."

Rule 25: "When you need help, ask." - revealed during Blood Brothers (episode).

Rule 26: "Always watch the watchers." - revealed in "Baltimore."

Rule 27: "If you feel like you are being played, you probably are." - revealed in Nature of the Beast (episode).

Rule 28: "Your case, your lead." - revealed in Bounce (episode) placing Tony as temporarily in charge of the team, and also in Phoenix (episode) with Ducky as leader.

Rule 29: "There is no such thing as coincidence." - revealed in Obsession (episode) although DiNozzo states that Rule 39A is "There is no such thing as a small world" during Canary (episode).

Rule 30: "If it seems like someone is out to get you, they are." - revealed in Borderland (episode).

Rule 31: "Never accept an apology from someone who just sucker punched you." - revealed in Psych Out (episode).

Rule 32: "First things first, hide the women and children." - This rule number was mentioned in Patriot Down (episode) but was not stated until Rule Fifty-One (episode).

Rule 33: "Clean up the mess that you make." - revealed in "Rule Fifty-One" although it's also stated as "Never leave behind loose ends" in Hiatus Part 2 (episode).

Rule 34: "Sometimes you're wrong." - Created by Gibbs in Rule Fifty-One" by writing it on the back of the card containing Rule 13. It is unknown if his coworkers are aware of this rule.

Rule 35: "Always give people space when they get off an elevator." - revealed in Double Back (episode)

Rule 36: "Never trust a woman who doesn't trust her man." - revealed in Devil's Triangle (episode).



While some seem to deal with Gibbs only there are some very great life lessons present. If you haven's started watching "NCIS" I suggest you start soon, it is all on Netflix.

"A slap to the face is an insult - a slap to the back of the head is a wake-up call." Leroy Jethro Gibbs
Cover Image Credit: CBS TV / Twitter

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Gypsy Rose Is A Victim And Should NOT Be In Prison For Her Mother's Murder

Watch "The Act," and you will know why!

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By now, everyone has heard of the new Hulu show called "The Act" which is centered around the case of Gypsy Rose Blanchard whose mother forced her to be sick in order to get money and sympathy, so she and her boyfriend ended up killing her and are now serving time in prison.

She and her mother were the center of many news stories. They went on a lot of charity trips through the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and they also received a lot of generous donations from strangers. Her mother claimed that she had all of these conditions, and what is scary is that everyone easily believed her.

One of the first times I had ever heard of this case was through this Buzzfeed article. It was very detailed and very scary as well that a parent would do that to her child when most parents hope for their kids to be happy and healthy.

Of course some people are quick to blame Gypsy because yes murder is bad, however, she sadly felt like this was her only way to escape her abusive mother. She had tried to escape, but her mother always found out and she ended up back in her arms.

I recently watched a documentary with her in it called "Mommy Dead and Dearest"—it was on HBO, but you can always find it somewhere on YouTube—where they have interviews with her family, people who knew her, and Gypsy herself.

After reading the whole story, I can't believe that a mother would do that, but it is believed that she had Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy

This mother was taking her daughter to the emergency room for little things such as a cough or a scraped knee trying to convince doctors that she had something wrong with her when in reality she was perfectly fine.

While the mother is to blame for what happened, the doctors weren't any better either. If they didn't find anything wrong with Gypsy then maybe they should have called the police on her mother or refuse to treat Gypsy because there was nothing wrong with her. I always wonder how her mother was able to get away with it for so long. I thought with the doctors' training that they would be able to spot a fake illness and report it to the police right away.

If you have Hulu, I would recommend watching "The Act." While it may not be all accurate, as most true crime shows are dramatized, it does bring awareness to this condition and Gypsy's story. I would also recommend watching the documentary as well, whether you have HBO or you find it on YouTube, it is worth your time to know the full story.

Here is hoping that Gypsy is able to get an early release and can have a normal life that her mom robbed her of.

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