The 7 Stages Of Fall Semester, Based On Ross Geller's Hair

The 7 Stages Of Your Fall Semester, Based On Ross Geller's Everchanging Hairstyles

"We were on a break!" — me doing homework over Thanksgiving break.

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I love the show "Friends." I have watched it more times than I can even remember. The humor is hilarious, the character dynamic is amazing. "Friends" is just a quality show.

However, there is one thing in "Friends" that is not always quality and that is Ross Geller's hair.

Stage 1: The beginning when you feel like you actually have your life together.

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At the start of the semester, you feel like you have your entire life together. Everything is so balanced. You wrote everything down in your planner. You are going to the gym every day. You are feeling like you are on top of everything -- maybe you will even make the President's List this semester!

If you were Ross Geller, your hair would be on FLEEK.

Stage 2: Near the start of the semester when you become SUPER involved. 

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When you go to a club rush, you decide not to sign up for one or two clubs, no. You sign up for eleven clubs. ELEVEN. Why not? You need to put yourself out there, right? Mom and Dad always did say to get involved.

If you were Ross Geller, your hair would be neat and tidy. The "professional look," if you will.

Stage 3: When everything adds up and your life begins to spiral out of control. 

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You know that point, around the end of September and beginning of October, when all of your midterms are during the same week and all of those clubs that you joined are having meetings on the same day? It becomes overwhelming. You feel like your life is getting out of control.

If you were Ross Geller, your hair would be due for some re-shaping. The height and the poofiness, it is just starting to get out of control.

Stage 4: That post-midterm paradise feeling. 

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Midterms are all over. The assignments are all submitted. Now, it is party time. And by party time I mean maybe staying out until midnight, but primarily catching up on all of that sleep you missed out on during midterms.

If you were Ross Geller, it would be time to bust out the OG Ross look — afro and mustache, baby.

Stage 5: It is Thanksgiving break and you do not know how to feel. 

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Should you be excited to spend the holiday with family and friends? Or should you lock yourself in your room and study for hours and hours on end? Who knows. It is a confusing time.

If you were Ross Geller, your hair would be in a decent place of spikiness. It would be a relatively good time in your hair life.

Stage 6: When you realize that midterm season was nothing compared to what finals season is. 

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Yeah, you may have thought that midterms were difficult. Well, that was before final exams came around and you realized that getting an A or a B in a class depends on this one last test (this test that is 40% of your entire grade in the class). You are getting no sleep. You are drinking seven cups of coffee a day. Your meals consist of Goldfish and Pop-Tarts. It is total insanity.

If you were Ross Geller, your hair would be unkempt. It would be the worst it has ever been. It would be getting too long, there would be too much gel. TOO MUCH.

Stage 7: It is FINALLY Christmas break.

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Finals are finally over. You get to go home to spend time with your family, see your home friends, eat home-cooked meals, and just genuinely relax. Life is so good. Everything is so good.

If you were Ross Geller, you would hop on that #NewHairNewMe #NewYearNewMe bandwagon. Sometimes you just need a fresh start.

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So, You Want To Be A Nurse?

You're going to find that nursing isn't really about the medicine or the assessments. Being a nurse is so much more than anything that you can learn in school. Textbooks can't teach you compassion and no amount of lecture time will teach you what it truly means to be a nurse.

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To the college freshman who just decided on nursing,

I know why you want to be a nurse.

Nurses are important. Nursing seems fun and exciting, and you don't think you'll ever be bored. The media glorifies navy blue scrubs and stethoscopes draped around your neck, and you can't go anywhere without hearing about the guaranteed job placement. You passed AP biology and can name every single bone in the human body. Blood, urine, feces, salvia -- you can handle all of it with a straight face. So, you think that's what being a nurse is all about, right? Wrong.

You can search but you won't find the true meaning of becoming a nurse until you are in the depths of nursing school and the only thing getting you through is knowing that in a few months, you'll be able to sign the letters "BSN" after your name...

You can know every nursing intervention, but you won't find the true meaning of nursing until you sit beside an elderly patient and know that nothing in this world can save her, and all there's left for you to do is hold her hand and keep her comfortable until she dies.

You'll hear that one of our biggest jobs is being an advocate for our patients, but you won't understand until one day, in the middle of your routine physical assessment, you find the hidden, multi-colored bruises on the 3-year-old that won't even look you in the eyes. Your heart will drop to your feet and you'll swear that you will not sleep until you know that he is safe.

You'll learn that we love people when they're vulnerable, but you won't learn that until you have to give a bed bath to the middle-aged man who just had a stroke and can't bathe himself. You'll try to hide how awkward you feel because you're young enough to be his child, but as you try to make him feel as comfortable as possible, you'll learn more about dignity at that moment than some people learn in an entire lifetime.

Every class will teach you about empathy, but you won't truly feel empathy until you have to care for your first prisoner in the hospital. The guards surrounding his room will scare the life out of you, and you'll spend your day knowing that he could've raped, murdered, or hurt people. But, you'll walk into that room, put your fears aside, and remind yourself that he is a human being still, and it's your job to care, regardless of what he did.

Each nurse you meet will beam with pride when they tell you that we've won "Most Trusted Profession" for seventeen years in a row, but you won't feel that trustworthy. In fact, you're going to feel like you know nothing sometimes. But when you have to hold the sobbing, single mother who just received a positive breast cancer diagnosis, you'll feel it. Amid her sobs of wondering what she will do with her kids and how she's ever going to pay for treatment, she will look at you like you have all of the answers that she needs, and you'll learn why we've won that award so many times.

You'll read on Facebook about the nurses who forget to eat and pee during their 12-hour shifts and swear that you won't forget about those things. But one day you'll leave the hospital after an entire shift of trying to get your dying patient to eat anything and you'll realize that you haven't had food since 6:30 A.M. and you, too, will be one of those nurses who put everything else above themselves.

Too often we think of nursing as the medicine and the procedures and the IV pumps. We think of the shots and the bedpans and the baths. We think all the lab values and the blood levels that we have to memorize. We think it's all about the organs and the diseases. We think of the hospitals and the weekends and the holidays that we have to miss.

But, you're going to find that nursing isn't really about the medicine or the assessments. Being a nurse is so much more than anything that you can learn in school. Textbooks can't teach you compassion, and no amount of lecture time will teach you what it truly means to be a nurse.

So, you think you want to be a nurse?

Go for it. Study. Cry. Learn everything. Stay up late. Miss out on things. Give it absolutely everything that you have.

Because I promise you that the decision to dedicate your life to saving others is worth every sleepless night, failed test, or bad day that you're going to encounter during these next four years. Just keep holding on.

Sincerely,

The nursing student with just one year left.

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What Makes A 'Strong' Female Character? I Asked 10 Women To Name Their Heroines, From Hermione To Uhura

Ten women talk about their favorite female film characters.

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I remember the last action movie I watched. The title isn't important, but the lack of women in the film was. Of course, this is fairly normal for most films, the women in the film, if any, are delegated to love interest or mother roles. Not that those aren't important, they are, but these characters have barely any lines and are given the role of confusion or wonder "what are you doing? What about the kids? Why are you leaving us?" and then never seen or mentioned again. Not only do they lack depth, but if they're used as a plot device to add depth to the male character, it's not working… if you give the character a wife he should probably be talking about her.

Thus begins my journey of finding what makes a strong female character, and what actual women look for when looking for a believable character. I asked 10 women about their favorite women in film.

Tracy Turnblad from "Hairspray."

"Tracy is a character who wants nothing but her dream of becoming a dancer on TV. When she achieves that dream, she uses her platform and her white privilege to promote diversity during the civil rights-era, and she's a plus-sized girl who embraces her weight and there is no plot point involving weight loss. What's not to love?" — Ashtyn G.

The Women of the "Mamma Mia!" series.

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"I feel that it's really nice to see a huge female cast that are all different and powerful in their own way. Sophie is contemplating marriage and the whole time is on this hunt to find out who she is and forging her own path. In the end, she decides not to marry and she seems happier for it, and I think that's a very important normalization for women to see. Her mother, Donna, is being portrayed in having a crazy and fun past but also stepping out and taking care of her daughter and a company all on her own. She knows she can be frisky and fun but she also is able to support herself and others, rather than women having to choose one or the other. Also, Donna's friends Tanya and Rosie are completely and utterly badass. Rosie wrote her own book and is comfortable being alone and also completely herself with no shame. Tanya is super sexual and isn't seen as a slut, she loves to have fun and doesn't want to be tied down, this is unthinkable in today's era but in the movie it doesn't matter! The male characters are hilarious but are forced to live at the whims and woes of the women, it's their life and they aren't gonna let the men dictate them." — Madeline C.

Wonder Woman from "Wonder Woman."

Gal Gadot (Wonder Woman) in "Wonder Woman."

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"Wonder Woman is a great character because, although she is stronger than every man she comes across, she doesn't see herself as being any better than them, and she insists on finding the good in everyone." — Hannah B.
"Wonder Woman has a such a passion for humanity and doesn't see herself as wildly superior to them. She uses her strength and wits to solve problems instead of turning to someone else for help. However, when she asks for help she doesn't have to 'swallow her pride' like a man would." — Isabel M.

Hermione Granger in the "Harry Potter" series.

Emma Watson (Hermione) in "Harry Potter."

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"I think she's a great character and a good example of a woman in film because she was more than just a love interest for another character, which is quite common for female roles. She was smart, brave, and strong which they showed throughout the series. She also wasn't the stereotypical 'super-feminine' girl either, which to me is nice and refreshing to see, since not every girl is like that." — Lexi W.

Meryl Steep in Anything and Everything.

"Meryl Streep has always embodied a strong, free willed and confident character that many people such as myself look up to. She has never faltered in believing in herself and her ability to take on the best diversity of roles, and that's what I appreciate most about her." — Hannah R.

Ellen Ripley from the "Alien" series.

"Ripley is one of the most badass female film characters. She is intelligent, strong, and in charge- everything that many women in film are not allowed to be. I like that she isn't traditionally feminine and that she is respected even though she totally differs from the norm." — Abby D.

Uhura from the "Star Trek" series.

"Uhura is an inspirational character. Not only was she a woman in a cast of mainly male characters, she was on the main crew, not just in the background. She was a strong female character in sci-fi too, which is a genre where you don't see a lot of females in lead roles. Another fun fact about the character is that the original Star Trek series debuted in 1966, so she was one of the first POC to be cast in a 'non-menial' role, which makes it all the more impressive considering she was also a woman of color." — Caroline B.

Raphina from "Sing Street."

Lucy Boynton (Raphina) in "Sing Street."

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"I really love Raphina because she's a very real and honest character - she has a bad home life and while she appears to cover it up by her edgy appearance, when she becomes close to Conor we see how imperfect her life really is. Despite all this, she still dreams of being a professional model in London, which is very inspiring, the way she doesn't let her unfortunate situation make her hopeless." — Jillian J.

Shuri from "Black Panther."

Letitia Wright (Shuri) in "Black Panther."

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"Shuri is the teenage mastermind behind all of the inventions and innovations of Wakanda. She faces criticism for her age, but it doesn't stop her quick wit and quicker mind. She's not only the brains on Wakanda, but also a strong, courageous, supportive, and protective sister and warrior. Shuri is a fantastic example of a woman and a great role model, especially for young women of color." — Annika B.

So, what do these women have in common? They don't seem the same… most don't associate Donna from "Mamma Mia!" with Shuri from "Black Panther." But all of these women have goals, wants, needs, flaws, and are seen as just regular people. They're strong in their own way. Tracy Turnblad may not have beaten anyone up, but she stands up for what she believes in.

"Strong female character" is a great trope, but shouldn't be reserved for the women who simply shoot a few guys in an action film. These women are strong in their own way, and it's what all filmmakers should focus on when writing and creating women for the screen.

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