Hiring great employees is a difficult task, but hiring them for a small business or startup is far more difficult. Not only is your budget more limited, but you're also looking for a more specific kind of person. Working in a small business is inherently more difficult due to the flatter structure and greater responsibilities, so not only do you need someone skilled, you need people who can thrive under pressure. By focusing on these seven techniques detailed by Robb Misso, the CEO of DMS and a John C Maxwell Executive Council member, you can find the right people to hire for your company.

1. Focus on Brand Development from the Start

Attracting top talent for your small business is difficult because you have no branding at the start. Some people grow up thinking about working for global corporations because they have an expectation of how it would be to work for them, either due to a positive company culture, the impact they have on the world, or both. To get people to want to work for you, your business must have that same appeal. Develop a strong brand from the start and you'll make things easier for yourself.

2. Challenge Them

To get the best people, you have to offer the best projects. Top talent generally doesn't want to waste their time on something that bores them. Give them interesting projects, stimulate their minds and imagination, and they'll come in through the door.

3. Create a Small Business with Intent

Just making a small business to make money isn't enough, though it's a good start. You must have a greater goal in mind. You must have a vision. It's that vision that will drive people with passion to work for you. You must also learn how to present that vision and mission to people in the best possible way.

4. Go Out and Meet People Constantly

When you're looking to hire more people, the best thing to do is keep meeting new people. Go out to events and meet-ups and networking conferences and talk to people. Not only will you meet more potential employees, you'll also get to develop your brand and talk to potential partners and investors.

5. Look to Your Community

There's nothing like a consumer when it comes to criticism. No one is more critical than someone who bought your offering. Chances are, parts of your community are skilled workers. Why not hire them? They're already invested in your product, making them great potential hires. In some instances, such as positions for your sales force, their eagerness can make up for their lack of initial skill.

6. Look to Other Parts of the Globe

Your small business may have limited capital and reach, but the Internet has made it easier to find remote workers than ever before. While you won't have the comfort and intimacy of face-to-face interaction, they can give your small business skills you can't find locally. It can also end up being cheaper, especially if you just need them for specific tasks.

7. Create a Positive Workplace

A great workplace environment doesn't just help you keep employees, it'll help you get them. "When they first walk into your office for their interview, they should be met with smiling faces and people who are genuinely enjoying their work," stated Robb Misso. Nothing pushes away top talent like anger, frustration, and a general feeling of negativity. Developing a positive workplace is about having the right company culture, as well as having a comfortable physical space that people won't mind spending long hours in.

Hiring top talent for your small business is no easy task, but it's not impossible either. You just have to do it mindfully. You can't just send out fliers and expect great people to walk in. Develop your brand and your company culture from the start. Meet as many people as possible to expand your fishing waters. It's time-consuming, but consider it an investment in your small business's future.

About Robb Misso:

Robb Misso founded Dynamic Manufacturing Solutions in order to go about manufacturing differently. For 25 years, he has worked tirelessly to create a positive work culture and empower skilled workers both inside and outside the office. Robb Misso is also the recipient of Austin's "Recognize Good Award," which honors community-minded individuals for local charity work.