Remember, You Are So Much More Than An Acceptance Letter

Remember, You Are So Much More Than An Acceptance Letter

Don't let your future scare you.
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Two years ago, 2015.

As December 18th crept up on me, I became restless. A senior in high school who would no longer sleep, spending every second thinking about what would happen. Would I get in? What if I get rejected? Where will I end up?

Questions that filled my mind with anxiety and nerves those days leading up to December 18th.

I woke up that day, with a pit in my stomach. How was I supposed to go through my daily schedule knowing that at any time, my life could change drastically. I though my future would be sealed with a simple email with a title either “Congratulations” or “We are sorry to inform you,” how could I not let this control my life.

I walked out of my math class and towards my car, thinking I would get the email about an hour later. As we live in a world today where everything is shared via social media, my heart sank when I saw those words on someone else’s profile, “University of Michigan Class of 2020.”

Fear consumed me as I rushed to my car to get my laptop.

I remember like it was yesterday, shaking while attempting to log in to have my fate sealed. This was the moment I was waiting for. In one simple world, the stress that built up in me exploded with excitement and relief, “Congratulations Halle.”

Now, almost two years later to the date, and I am finishing my first semester of sophomore year. Although only two years, it feels like reading that email was in a different lifetime, that I was a different person. A person who let her dreams overtake her emotions, a person who feared her future, instead of embracing it.

As I write this, I think about the seniors in high school who may be feeling the same way. Up late at night reading about their dream school, calculating their chances of admissions, letting the anxiety of the unknown take over their lives, and happiness.

As easy as it may be for me to say this, now going through it and it ending it my favor, be stronger than a word on the top of a letter. Let the fear of the unknown foster into excitement on what could happen, not what will happen if things don’t happen.

This experience taught me how I don’t want to spend my life; fearing things I can’t control, being anxious for things that won’t make or break me, and letting one thing, decision or person be my end all be all.

As cliché as it sounds, it’s imperative to remember that you are so much more than an acceptance or rejection letter.

As I think back to that senior girl in high school that once was me, I remember how this brutal time in the year made me better, stronger, and happier. I was able to overcome my fears, open that letter that revealed the fate of my future, and go to my dream school where I would meet the best friends I have ever made, and make the greatest memories.

Although things may seem stressful now, remember how fast time flies. Before you know it you will be a second-semester sophomore, home for winter break, remembering the good parts of college acceptance season, and wishing you didn’t let the worry occupy you.

Be thankful for the opportunity that is about to present itself, your future is waiting for you, and it will be worth it.

Cover Image Credit: Instagram | @hblum17

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11 Life Lessons I Learned In My 3rd Semester Of College That I Wish I Had Known In My 1st And 2nd

It's been more of a learning journey than I'd like to admit, but I'm glad I know these things now.

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The first year of college is rough—you're on your own for the first time, school just got stupidly hard, and you have no idea what you're doing. Once sophomore year hits though, you're pretty much an expert—you've probably settled into your major, joined a few clubs you're passionate about, and finally figured out how to handle this whole "life" thing. While reflecting on the past year and a half of our lives, my friends and I compiled a list of the core things we wish we had known before now.

1. Befriend people who intimidate you 

Mean Girls

My first two semesters of college, I spent a lot of time being jealous of my peers who seemed to have it all together and were doing "better" than me. Once I actually became friends with some of these people, I realized that they're also just people and have struggles just like I do. I also found that by surrounding myself with equally (or more) motivated people, I was able to accomplish so much more.

2. Learn to say no every once in a while 

No

The opportunities on a college campus are just about endless, so it's easy to get caught up with so many things to do that you don't have time for what you actually want to do. Learning how to say no (and not feeling guilty about it) has helped me focus my energy and time on what matters most to me.

3. Mental health is so important 

Meditate

'Nuff said.

4. Stop telling yourself you can't be good at things 

Help

About halfway through the semester, I started running for the simple reason that I've always told myself it was something I couldn't do. After training for and finishing a 5K, I've proven myself wrong and gained a confidence that has transferred over into all aspects of my life.

5. You need all different types of people in your life 

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It's important to have a balance of friends and family in your circle. You need some who you can laugh with, some who you can cry with, and some who nudge you out of your comfort zone.

6. Romantic relationships do not, and should not, define you as a person 

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Over the years, I've been very insecure about my (non-existent) dating life. I've felt that I'm "less than" for having an S.O. This semester, I learned that having a strong support system is much more valuable than a strong romantic relationship. The right person will come along eventually.

7. Stepping out of your comfort zone usually works out well 

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I have a lot of fear when it comes to meeting and talking to new people. I don't like to do things alone. This semester, I finally stepped out of my comfort zone in this regard by trying things by myself without a friend with me, and honestly, I had a blast.

8. Enjoy your alone time 

Roommates can become instant best friends. However, their presence automatically means you lose a large chunk of your alone time. When you get a free moment to yourself, take advantage of it. Your mental health will thank you.

9. Take part in events, no matter how cheesy they may seem 

Yes, colleges can be corny with some of their more wholesome activities. These events will only be available to you for a short portion of your life. I've found that sometimes you can make better memories at things like that than you can at a bar.

10.  Try things, even if you don't think you're good enough to keep up 

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So maybe you were the star in high school. Maybe you weren't. Either way, you shouldn't stop yourself from trying out for sports or activities in college because you think you "aren't good enough." No matter how big your college is, there's no way you'll know whether or not you can do something until you actually try to do it. More times than not, something will work out in your favor.

11.  Take advantage of the ridiculous amount of opportunities available to you. 

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Your college years are going to be full of opportunities—both academic and social. You have every chance and every tool to succeed, it just comes down to actually taking the leap and making those opportunities work out for you.

Even though all of these things would have been nice to know in the past, I think that not knowing them made us into stronger human beings overall as we've learned and grown from our mistakes. So don't be afraid to fall into these traps yourself–sometimes, the best way to learn is to fall a few times before you can get up and stay up.

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