4 Reasons You Should Bee Grateful For Bugs

4 Reasons You Should Bee Grateful For Bugs

Think twice before you grab a shoe to "take care of" that pestering honeybee.

123
views

A billion dollar industry, a cure to illnesses, and crucial to our survival - bugs. Insects are probably the most despised and neglected creatures on our planet, but in reality, they do much more good than bad for humans and our planet. Believe it or not, those disgusting creatures that make you cringe at the sight of them are actually just here to help.

1. Insects contribute immensely to the economy.

These seemingly useless creatures perform billions of dollars of labor in agriculture, at no cost. According to a study at Cornell, insects are responsible for pest control, crop pollination, and grazing lands which would typically cost farmers about $57 billion dollars a year. This free labor alone is enough to appreciate the unseen services which insects provide us!

2. They're a surgeon's right-hand-man.

How could insects possibly be used to aid in surgery? In recent clinical trials, it's been discovered that the venom from the deathstalker scorpion, when combined with fluorescents, can help surgeons to easily identify and target the tumor in patients' brains. In this article from the Smithsonian, they describe a success story of using this venom to remove a tumor from a young boy's brain.

3. No pollination, no peaches.

Bees' pollination is responsible for much more than just honey. Their services are crucial to providing us with watermelons, peaches, cherries, and apple... just to name a few. One of their largest contributions though is the California almond pollination. Brittany Goodrich explains further, "California is the world's biggest supplier of almonds, making up 77 percent of all production in 2017." Bees are imported to CA for their one-of-a-kind services that allow the majority of the world to enjoy almonds.

4. Don't knock them until you try them!

In many countries outside of the US, it's considered normal and even a delicacy to enjoy insects with your meal. When diving deeper into the nutrients they can provide our bodies, it is clear why grasshoppers will be welcomed to the dinner table. Ipatenco writes that 3.5 oz serving of grasshoppers can account for a minimum of 25% of our daily protein needs. Caterpillars are also a popular dish in Africa, providing consumers with a great source of zinc, calcium, and potassium. Knowing these health benefits, it's no surprise that bugs are consumed across the globe.

All insects are on our planet for a reason, and many of those reasons are to aid in our survival and well-being. One could even argue that they're more considerate of caring for our planet than we are. So, next time you see a honeybee in your vicinity think twice before you start swatting at one of nature's biggest helpers.

Popular Right Now

10 Things I Wish Animal Rights People Knew About The Livestock Industry

Get educated.
22909
views

So last week, I wrote an open letter to PETA, calling them out on their lack of salvation for the animals burned by the recent wildfires. I received a lot of attention for this article, both good and bad.

In reading the comments posted in response by animal rights activists, I discovered some things that just didn't add up. Amidst the insults and hypocrisy, there were just some downright stupid assumptions that these people see as facts. It's not their fault, they're just uneducated, so I feel we as an industry should try to get some truth out there.

So, here are 10 things I wish animal rights supporters knew about the livestock industry:

1. A 20-25 year life expectancy for cows is not realistic.

Just because some cow somewhere lived to be 25 does not mean that they would live that long without the agriculture industry. Most cows used for beef production live to be about 13-15 years old and die of natural causes. In sandy environments, cows live around 5-9 years because the sand degrades their teeth to the point that they cannot eat.

2. Livestock would mate and reproduce each year without the help of humans.

I kinda thought it was common knowledge that most species cycle monthly when they reach sexual maturity. When females cycle, they do their best to get bred. There's no forcing going on there. If they were left in the wild, they would still mate and reproduce causing inbreeding.

SEE ALSO: Don't Buy That Coverup: Boycott Animal Testing

3. Farmers and ranchers are not just upset at the loss of profit from these fires.

I couldn't believe my eyes the first time I read this, and then the second, and eighth. Farmers and ranchers are not only upset about the loss of profit, which is devastating, but also upset to see their animals suffer. Have you ever had to put something out of its misery? Watch a cow writhe around sluffing its charred flesh off, hear it wheeze, and watch a rancher put a bullet in its head out of pity, and I guarantee the sadness in that rancher's heart isn't about money.

4. All "momma cows" are not dairy cows.

There are hundreds of breeds of cattle out there. Some breeds have certain traits that are suited for different parts of production agriculture. Not every momma cow is milked by hand daily and her milk sold.

5. All dairy calves are not ripped from their mother and slaughtered moments after birth.

I don't know much about the dairy industry, but since it is up and running obviously there have to be live calves to grow into cows and bulls.

6. Beef cattle are not raised in close quarters.

The operations that raise beef cattle from birth are called cow/calf operations. These cattle roam over large pastures and fields most of their lives.

7. Sheep are sheared for their own good.

I cannot count how many pictures I have seen posted by animal rights organizations of mutilated sheep. That's gross and unless someone is a complete dunce with a razor, that never happens. Sheep will overheat with a full coat, or become matted to the point he/or she cannot move.

8. There is not enough cropland to sustain everybody in the world.

Oh man, okay so as animal rights activists you guys want us to let all the cows, horses, sheep, goats, and pigs roam at their own free will. You think we can all live off veggie-tales reruns and rainbows but that is not so. If all animals are roaming free, they have to eat too. So they need space, and the crops humans eat need space. IT WON'T WORK.

9. It's not all about the money.

Lol, yeah right. Have you worked in agriculture? The bank owns our asses.

10. It's not gonna happen.

You can go on your crusades, you can martyr yourselves. It's not gonna work. Meat will always be a necessity.

But mostly PETA people, get educated!

Cover Image Credit: Straight

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

The Reality Of Cat Shows

Go in with an open mind, because cat shows may seem totally bizarre, but are incredibly fun and special.

17
views

As a self-declared cat lady, when I decided to attend my first cat show I was hyped to pet all the kitties, and watch them do tricks, or show off their beauty. After attending a few, I know they're totally unique and amazing events that everyone should be attending.

Upon arriving, you will probably need to pay an entry fee, and maybe there's an area for donations for local animal shelters (yes, animal breeders support animal shelters!). You might be overwhelmed with the sheer amount of cats, as far as the eye can see. Having a game plan of cats to visit might seem fun, but just roaming and visiting is a lot more fulfilling, and you may discover breeds of cats you never knew you would love. Usually, cat shows will feature visiting areas for guests attending the show to view, and sometimes pet, the cats. As well as areas where cats are judged and given awards, sort of like miniature stages.

Visitor areas are pretty self-explanatory as you can roam around and look at the dozens of different breeds, of kittens and cats alike. The diversity will amaze you and the cats are all special and loved by their owner. Because cats can catch sicknesses while surrounded by so many other cats, it's important to sanitize your hands before petting, as well as asking the owner if you can pet their cat or kitten. Some may even let you hold their cat, but this would be rare and you shouldn't get your hopes up! While viewing cats, you may find some that are up for adoption and could find a new family member. Some cats are actually people's household pets, and are scored differently from a cat who was bred for its looks!

The competition side is where the cat shows get interesting. You can view any and all competitions, although there will be many occurring at a time. That's because cats will initially be ranked against the cats of the same breed as them, and within those breeds, by gender and color style. Winning best in the breed is the first step to becoming the champion of a cat show. Watch as owners get nervous and excited as the tiny plastic awards go up, showing which cat was victorious. Although all judges can be different, it's fun to see beautiful and friendly cats win awards and look pleased with themselves as their owner smiles with pride.

Later in the day or weekend, one cat will be chosen as the grand champion out of the best in breeds. Usually, fans can vote on their favorite as well, and award a special cat a top prize, although unofficial, for its cuteness and spirit. A hairless cat has won fan favorite at every show I attended!

Go in with an open mind, because cat shows may seem totally bizarre, but are incredibly fun and special. The group of people who participate will love to tell you about their amazing cat and let you in on cat show secrets. A place where cat lovers unite, what could be better?

Related Content

Facebook Comments