Racism Still Exists

Racism Still Exists

It is on every college campus, it’s in politics, or even in the values your parents instilled in you
Adrian
Adrian
222
views

As a student on one of the most diverse campus in the United States, I see many different cultures every day. However, you may not realize that some of these familiar faces are still experiencing some sort of racism today. Racism is the prejudice, discrimination or oppression of a person or race based on the belief that one’s own race is superior. The United States of America has had a strong racist past, including slavery, but has it really gone away?

We no longer have segregated schools and bathrooms, but we do still have racial inequality. Not only are minorities, paid less, but they are often left to do menial jobs that the “white man”, wouldn’t do. On the other hand, there are instances across the country concerning Police Brutality and the stance for Black Lives Matter. Not only are people being racially profiled, but belittled as well for their views. For example, the Black Lives Matter movement is being belittled by other groups who have not been oppressed in the past as some people feel that the black community is being prejudice towards others and are trying to start the campaign for All Lives Matter. Thing is, that Black Lives Matter is a movement standing for everyone, and fighting for equal rights; it is not just a movement for the black community but a movement for equality.

Even though issues like segregation and slavery ended years ago, it doesn’t mean that is is gone for good. In fact, it is still a prominent issue in our American society. Whether it stems from a joke, or simply just a person believing that white people, are the dominant race. With our current President, Donald Trump we are brought back to a primitive state, in which he believes that people of white decent are the dominant race. Not only is he oppressing people, but promoting racism in our society. Recently at Quinnipiac University, a student took a racist joke too far; the student [white], had a face mask on her [black], and quoted the picture with the famous issue in the black community that “Black lives matter”. Even though the university took disciplinary action against the student, it still doesn’t change the fact that it happened.

Racism is real and an issue that will continue, the thing to keep in mind is that it never really goes away. It is on every college campus, it’s in politics, or even in the values your parents instilled in you. Even though you don’t see active members of the KKK walking down every block in all white, doesn’t mean that they are gone; in fact, the group is still at large, and considered an act of terrorism. No matter what, we do not live in a race free world. Instead of shying away from what makes you uncomfortable, people need to make a change and realize that everyone is equal, and should be considered equal in every way.

As a hope for the American future, all we can do is hope for a place that everyone can call home, and equal. Will this happen? We can only hope so, but till then we need to educate the younger generations, and create change and promote the equality and freedom for all. Every single person should have a safe place to call home, no matter what race where they feel loved and deserved by those around them instead of the hatred and ignorance that our society is based on. It may take some time, but it will change. No person should be fearful or timid because of their race: black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Middle Eastern, or any race we should all be equal.

Popular Right Now

3 Reasons Why Step Dads Are Super Dads

36949
views

I often hear a lot of people complaining about their step-parents and wondering why they think that they have any authority over them. Although I know that everyone has different situations, I will be the first to admit that I am beyond blessed to have a step dad. Yep, I said it. My life wouldn't be the same that it is not without him in it. Let me tell you why I think step dads are the greatest things since sliced bread.

1. They will do anything for you, literally.

My stepdad has done any and every thing for me. From when I was little until now. He was and still is my go-to. If I was hungry, he would get me food. If something was broken, he would fix it. If I wanted something, he would normally always find a way to get it. He didn't spoil me (just sometimes), but he would make sure that I was always taken care of.

SEE ALSO: The Thank You That Step-Parents Deserve

2. Life lessons.

Yup, the tough one. My stepdad has taught me things that I would have never figured out on my own. He has stood beside me through every mistake. He has been there to pick me up when I am down. My stepdad is like the book of knowledge: crazy hormonal teenage edition. Boy problems? He would probably make me feel better. He just always seemed to know what to say. I think that the most important lesson that I have learned from my stepdad is: to never give up. My stepdad has been through three cycles of leukemia. He is now in remission, yay!! But, I never heard him complain. I never heard him worry and I never saw him feeling sorry for himself. Through you, I found strength.

3. He loved me as his own.

The big one, the one that may seem impossible to some step parents. My stepdad is not actually my stepdad, but rather my dad. I will never have enough words to explain how grateful I am for this man, which is why I am attempting to write this right now. It takes a special kind of human to love another as if they are their own. There had never been times where I didn't think that my dad wouldn't be there for me. It was like I always knew he would be. He introduces me as his daughter, and he is my dad. I wouldn't have it any other way. You were able to show me what family is.

So, dad... thanks. Thanks for being you. Thanks for being awesome. Thanks for being strong. Thanks for loving me. Thanks for loving my mom. Thanks for giving me a wonderful little sister. Thanks for being someone that I can count on. Thanks for being my dad.

I love you!

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Maybe It's Time For Even Black People To Stop Saying The 'N-Word'

There's no time nor place to use the word, whether it connotes to something negative or positive.

13
views

I've been thinking about this topic for a while now. I recently went to a party with a couple of my friends, and usually, at a PWI like Rutgers, I'll always aware when I'm one of the few black people in the room. And since I'm one of the few black people in the room, I'm always hyper-sensitive of any racial tensions that may arise within the party scene. I think it was Meek Mill's "Dreams and Nightmares" that came on and I was dancing with these two white girls, and I couldn't tell if they were singing along or not because it was too dark, but I swore I heard them say the n-word. It just made me so angry, and I hate that as one of the few black people in the room, I felt obliged to tell them that the word isn't something for them to say.

And that had been my entire mindset about the word for a while now, that only black people can say the word because we're the only ones who can truly understand the context of the word. But my boyfriend and I got into a discussion a few nights ago about Halsey, who is a popular biracial — with one black parent and one white parent — singer, though she is white passing.

iamhalsey / Instagram

We got into a discussion of whether or not she should be able to say the 'n-word,' and my boyfriend said that she shouldn't be able to because if her fanbase is mostly non-black, they would think they are justified in saying the word if their favorite white-passing celebrity can. Because yes, although she is half black, to an average onlooker who doesn't know her, they would think that she's white. The black social justice warrior wanted to say that she could say it because despite her other half, at the end of the day she is a black woman, and to strip her of her right to say a word that we've reclaimed is almost like stripping her of half of her identity.

But then I really thought about it. The usage of the "n-word' has so many nuances. Like, what if someone is a quarter black, like Cardi B, are they allowed to use the word? Because we can use the same justification for them as we can use for Halsey. Furthermore, can Africans use the word, even if the word was only used against African Americans? Is there a particular percentage of black that you can be to really use the word? And what if you're fully black, yet still white passing... are you still allowed to use the word even if other people wouldn't see you as black?

That's when I told him, "Maybe no one should say the 'n-word.'" And I know that kind of struck him by surprise, but the more I started to think about it, the more it made sense to me. If it's a word that no one but black people can use, and if it's so offensive, why are us black people even using it?

Honestly, it's just my opinion, but I think you can't reclaim a word with so much history. I feel like it's different with women, who reinvented the meaning of and became empowered by "bitch" or members of the LGBTQ+ community reclaiming the word "queer." Because although yes, those words have been used to oppress and discriminate against certain groups, I feel like the 'n-word' has terrible connotations that span across centuries. The 'n-word' has been used to systematically, institutionally, and personally degrade, enslave, and inhibit black people from reaching their full potential in society. The word itself has been used to dehumanize blacks and make them believe that they are "less than" any other race.

It's a word with so much history, hurt, and torment behind it, and I feel like it's not something we can reclaim and make into something positive. And I thought what the arguments that can be used against my opinion... like maybe, this is the one thing people have, so why try and take it away from us? or black people have been using it to talk to other black people for a while now, saying it is no different than slaves calling each other that.

And I think those arguments are completely valid. But back then, black people used it to refer to other black people because they legitimately saw each other as less than because that's what the slave masters wanted them to think. And while yes, black people have had a lot of things taken away from us, I think that we as a people can't thrive while still calling each other something that was used to dehumanize us (and still used in some places) for so long.

Again, it's just my opinion, but it's something that I've given a lot of thought to. There's no time nor place to use the word, whether it connotes to something negative or positive. Maybe we should all just agree that this is a particular word that can't be reclaimed and can't be rebranded. As long as racism and prejudice exist, we won't really ever get away from the true context or meaning of the word. You can't take out an "-er" and slap an "-a" at the end and believe the word is OK to use now.

Maybe it's time to leave the word in the past, where it rightfully belongs.

Related Content

Facebook Comments