Ohio State Can Afford A Living Wage

Ohio State Can Afford A Living Wage

I urge all Ohio State undergraduate students to vote yes on issue 1 and pressure the university into providing a very affordable living wage.
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On March 5-7th, the Ohio State Fight for $15 is seeking to accomplish something unprecedented. There will be a ballot initiative--Issue 1--up for vote in the Undergraduate Student Government election. Such an initiative, of any stripe, has never passed before.

We are calling upon the undergraduate student body of the Ohio State University to vote yes on Issue 1 in order to express the collective will of the more than 45,000 undergraduate students on our campus that waged employees deserve and need to make not only a minimum wage but a living one.

Tuition costs are going up; housing costs are going up; food costs are going up. It is becoming more and more difficult and more and more expensive to be an Ohio State student and to live in Columbus, OH. It seems only natural that wages should rise alongside these increased costs.

The primary objection people seem to have to our campaign is that it is simply unaffordable, unfortunately not possible. This concern is patently absurd in lieu of Ohio State's budget.

Leaving aside, for now, the 13 university employees who pocketed over a million dollars in salary last year--and the countless others who netted six figures--or the notorious $1.3 million clock tower that is nothing more than a glorified exercise in vanity, this school still has a lot of money.

According to their official website, the Ohio State University will be operating with a half a billion dollar surplus in their 2018 budget. That is a staggering amount of money that we will just not be using.

To put this into perspective vis-à-vis the Fight for $15, if the university had to pay 8,000 employees for 24 hours of work all 365 days of the year, without overtime pay, an increased wage of $15 (as opposed to the current minimum wage of $8.30, which some employees already make more than), they would still have roughly $30 million to spare.

Now, of course, this situation is absurd; it is quite literally not possible to work 24 hours a day every day. Delving further into the aforementioned financial summary report, we can see that the university employs roughly 18,000 waged employees (nearly 13,000 students and about 5,000 non-students).

Assuming Ohio State broke overtime pay legislation and was currently only paying all 18,000 of these employees the current minimum wage of $8.30 (which, again, is not the case), all 18,000 of them would still need to work 77 hour workweeks every single week of the year for the proposed wage increase to dip into non-surplus funds. During the Gilded age, the average manufacturing employee worked fewer than 65 hours a week, for perspective.

This also fails to take into account rules that disallow students from working no more than 28 hours a week for the university. Even if every student employee worked their maximum workweek every week of the year (including summer and other breaks), non-student employees would need to literally work between 26 and 27 hours a day, every single day of the year for the wage increase to dip into non-surplus funds. Again, this is obviously impossible.

The idea that this university can somehow not afford to pay their employees a living wage is, frankly, laughable. There is beyond more than enough extra money for us to pay workers what they deserve, what they have earned, what they need to survive and thrive as students or members of this community.

Vote 'yes' on Issue 1.

Cover Image Credit: Ohio State YDSA

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11 Thoughts Every UConn Husky Has When It Rains On Tuesdays

It's really quite odd how it happens honestly.

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There's a running theory around the University of Connecticut that it always rains on Tuesdays.

I didn't believe it either until I got here and it in fact, always rains on Tuesdays. Maybe not full blown like recently (thanks mother nature), but it does. And when it does... we all suffer. We're all on the same page with how miserable it is so let me just share with you what goes on in the head of a waterlogged husky.

1. I should use my umbrella

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It'll keep be nice and dry.

2. Nope. Forget the umbrella. 

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I didn't want to use it anyway...

3. I should have taken the bus. 

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At least that would mean I wouldn't have to walk.

4. Wait. Where is the bus? 

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Never where it's supposed to be. Thanks UConn transit services. Did you know we all hate the new bus routes? Well now you do.

5. Is my laptop getting wet?

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My backpack isn't waterproof... what's happening in there??? Should I run???

6. Should I sue the school if my laptop gets water damage? 

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Surely it's their fault right?

7. This rain jacket is doing nothing. 

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I guess it's still good I have one though.

8. Do I bother wearing my hood? 

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Doesn't matter. Your hair is already wet.

9. Do I bother showering later? 

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Might as well have brought my body wash and shampoo with me.

10. WHY ARE YOU WEARING MOCCASINS?????

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Good because it's R A I N I N G.

11. Rain boots are a gift from god. 

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Splash in those puddles like Peppa Pig. It's the only joy you'll get that day.

The only thing that benefits from the rain is the grass. Good for you grass because the rest of us HATE it.

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How I Escaped My Hoarding Tendencies

I was once a hoarder.

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Up until my third year of college, I kept everything. I had notes, homework, and tests from all of my classes starting in kindergarten, all the way until my college years. My walls were filled with photos, art, birthday and thank-you cards, plane and movie tickets, receipts, and even interesting shopping bags I'd collected over the years. Drawers were stuffed with random pieces of toys with which I felt strong emotional connections. I still kept clothes from elementary school that I certainly could not wear anymore, but for some reason felt that I needed to keep.

Despite being a hoarder, I was still quite organized. My room, usually messy, was relatively well-organized. However, during college, something for me changed. I was suddenly annoyed with all of the things I had kept over the years, and wanted a clean slate. I tore everything down from my walls, pulled out all the clothes in my closet, and decided to start over.

This whole adventure of me decluttering my room took three full days, dozens of trash bags full of items to donate, and so much excess emotional garbage. When I was finally finished, I felt so much emotional relief. While I really enjoyed sifting through every piece of paper that I had written, every exam I had taken, every toy and card that had been gifted to me, and all the clothes that no longer fit me, I was happy to finally be finished. My head hurt from the nostalgia, but I slept incredibly well that night.

Since then, I've learned how to live on a minimal amount of stuff. My room is usually tidy and I've found cleaning and organizing to be addicting and cathartic. I now keep only things with which I have strong emotional connections, like the bracelet my now-deceased grandmother gave me and the farewell letters written by my friends before I moved away for graduate school.

With fewer concrete memorabilia stowed away, I can cherish the memories that mean the most to me and focus on identifying the memories happening in the present that I want to remember forever.

Tidying up also helped me achieve a lot of my career goals in life. I don't think this success would have been possible if I had been disorganized and distracted by the past that cluttered my room.

With all of that said, I still have a long ways to go in terms of tidying my life. My work life is definitely not as organized as my home life. My desk and computer files are not organized in the best way, but I hope to implement my personal life philosophy into my work life in the future. My social and familial life are also quite disorganized. After moving to a new city, I found the initial socializing to be overwhelming and struggled to prioritize the people I wanted to spend time with. However, I am slowly working to improve this balance of my social and familial life.

While I am still on this journey, I wanted to share the impact that decluttering has had on my so far and hope that this would inspire you to identify things you can declutter in your own life.

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