Refugees Are Human Beings, No Exceptions

Refugees Are Human Beings, No Exceptions

Stop acting like their brown lives don't matter.

454
views

Earlier this week photos arose informing the world that Trump had decided to tear gas migrants seeking asylum at the US-Mexican border. Seventy-plus refugee men, women and children were seen caught in a cloud of painful gas as they fled from what had seemed to be their only protection.

They were a part of a caravan of over 5,000 refugees traveling from far and wide seeking protection. They fled widespread gang violence and extreme poverty, which left them no choice but to leave for a better life or die.

Despite our country's raging racism and domestic terrorism issues, it seems like a vacation compared to the conditions the refugees have to deal with. Many believe that the motivation to come to the U.S. stems from a noble cause to make money for your family and start anew, but these refugees are running for their lives. Their home countries, wrecked by U.S. policies that forced convicted criminals back, suffer from an infestation of gang activities and civil wars.

Their youth are enticed into gangs in order to support their families and an endless cycle of gang violence and continued inequalities creates a dangerous atmosphere. Local police and judicial systems try to control the violence but gangs are so rampant there seems to be no solution.

There is danger at every corner and the only light seems to be America, a predominately Christian country founded by immigrants fleeing persecution and danger.

Rather than being met with help and kindness, a tyrant of a president has continuously failed to meet the requirements of normal humanity. Placing them in cages, separating families, tear gassing children; it seems as if these brown lives also do not matter to the president.

Refugees are humans, with families and needs just like our own. They seek help and safety, nothing more, and as human beings, we must extend them kindness. Our country claims to be a world superpower, "effectively" delegating wars from afar and balancing world peace. But what is to say about what's happening to our neighbor's next door? How could we ignore the atrocities they continue to face as if they do not share the same Earth as ours?

The treatment we continue to see forced upon these refugees is disgusting especially since the Christmas season nears. Seventy-five percent of Americans identify as Christian, with 73% of the GOP identifying as Christian, and yet they lack the human decency and Christian duty to care for refugees.

It seems they have forgotten their own Savior was a refugee, seeking shelter and kindness where none was found. It seems their kindness only extends to their close circle, eliminating a chance for these brown lives to matter. It seems like American Christians have strayed far from their faith to appeal to political ideology and a burnt orange tyrant who cares about only himself.

Refugees are human beings. They are important and they are in danger. Stop treating them like their brown lives do not matter.

Popular Right Now

Austin Alexander Burridge, Volunteer Advocate, Shares 3 Great Reasons to Volunteer and Help Others

Austin Alexander Burridge is an avid academic who studies Environmental Science at Winona State University and believes that work in the service of others is a key pillar to personal development.

8155
views

Sometimes it's easy for someone to adopt a "me, me, me" attitude. While focusing on oneself, a person may feel nice in the moment, but serving and helping others will bring lasting benefits. While there are many great reasons to serve and help others, there are three universal truths that resonate with volunteers around the globe.

Austin Alexander Burridge's 3 Reasons to Volunteer:

1. Accomplishment

Often, people fall into a trap of focusing on themselves when they are feeling down. Maybe someone did not get a job they wanted. Or perhaps a person gets dumped by an expected lifelong companion. Maybe someone feels they have underachieved after looking at Facebook and seeing great things a high school classmate has accomplished. When feeling down, helping others is a proven way to improve one's mood and attitude, and it can provide a sense of pride and accomplishment. The act of giving to those in need is an inherently good action and leaves people with a wonderful feeling of joy.

2. Gratitude

One can become more appreciative of life by serving others that have less. Whether volunteering at a soup kitchen, visiting the elderly at an assisted living center, or helping families after a natural disaster, service enables people to be grateful for what they have. Seeing people who have fewer advantages, especially those who are spirited and thankful for small things, allows one to realize just how fortunate he/she is in life.

3. Friendships

Volunteering is a great way to build meaningful friendships, not only with other volunteers but also with those who are served. One of the most profound and fascinating aspects of these relationships is how volunteers will learn from those served and vice versa. As these special bonds are built, they lead to impactful connections that last for years to come.

Of course, these are just a few reasons to volunteer and serve others. One can never go wrong by helping others as opposed to merely focusing on oneself. Volunteering invariably and inevitably contributes to personal growth, development, and satisfaction.

About Austin Alexander Burridge: Helping others has been of paramount importance to Austin, and as a part of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA), Austin gave back to the community around him. He also has participated in annual peanut butter drives, The Minnesota Sandwich Project for the Homeless and collected canned goods for local food shelters. Additionally, Austin has a passion for the environment, which he pursued when visiting the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador, and the Amazon Rain Forest while studying at the School of Environment Studies, which investigates ecological systems and their sustainability

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Introducing Miah Johnson

"It made me learn to love and live in every moment as if it were the last." -Miah Johnson

12
views

It was Daddy Donut day at Teasley Elementary School, but for Miah Johnson, it was just another day in which she had to pretend everything was okay. It had been a month since Miah's dad was deported and left her hopeless.

As Johnson took her last sip of coffee she laughs. She shares how hard it was for her to talk about her father. Many people do not know about the days she spent crying because she needed him, or how she was not sure if they would ever move past the hard times. How she went days without being able to eat a proper meal because they did not have enough money to make ends meet. Ashamed and embarrassed she shares her memories of going to church early in the morning for bread, canned soup, and powdered milk. She explains that there are times when she gets excited to share something with her father but strange darkness takes over and she loses hope that one day a real relationship with him will exist.

Johnson was born in Fort Lauderdale Florida in 1999. She is the only child of her small sheltered loving family. Her childhood was a fairy tale, her best friend was her stepfather, "I wasn't his biological daughter, but he raised me as one and I will always be grateful for the memories." Johnson's eyes flood with tears as she reminiscences on her past. School work was the best way she coped with her loss. She always made herself busy, if she didn't have any homework she would read, pick up a new hobby or dance. Going to bed was the hardest part of her day. All of the thoughts and feelings she fought so hard to keep away came pouring out in a way she does not know how to describe. Not having her father broke her in many ways, but the one she speaks about most often is not having a financially and emotionally stable home.

Johnson attended Elon University on a full ride her freshman year but decided to transfer to a school closer to home. Johnson was not ready to leave she admitted quietly. She describes that there was a shift in her during her first semester there, for the first time she failed classes, gained 20 pounds and lost her scholarship. Her failure comes from a lack of stability and support. The friendships she made there weren't enough to keep her there, she could no longer afford the prestigious college. Now she takes classes online at Kennesaw State University. She has to work two jobs in order to make ends meet for her and her family. Johnson laughs at the situation and explains how her father used to lecture her on how education is the best way out of their situation. Now she feels like she has disappointed him and that she has to make up for the broken promise.

There is never enough money. Johnson has made plans to visit her father multiple times but has never been able to visit him. There is always something that comes up. Her mother's car broken down the first time, they couldn't afford to pay the bills the other time, and the last time she needed a car of her own to help get to and from work. She shows a screenshot of her bank account. Negative eight dollars. She sighs and states that life has a funny way of getting in the way of the important things.

Johnson believes that if her father was still here, it would be different. She would have never known what it was like to go hungry, feel so hopeless, and do not have a stable home.

She explains that it was an experience she doesn't share because it is painful to talk about but, "It made me learn to love and live in every moment as if it were the last."

Related Content

Facebook Comments